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Diabetes And Weight Loss For Type 2

Diabetes And Weight Loss for Type 2

Diabetes And Weight Loss for Type 2

Obesity and diabetes are intimately linked. In particular, abdominal obesity can be a major culprit in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Research shows that if you are overweight and have been diagnosed with Diabetes Type 2, losing weight will significantly lower your blood sugar levels and also improve your overall health. So, yes. Diabetes and weight loss makes immense sense. But, could there be a “right” and a “wrong” way to achieve your weight loss goals?
Diabetes And Weight Loss Dilemma
The most important thing to understand is this – any weight loss is good. According to Cathy Nonas, MS, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association and a professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, “No matter how heavy you are, you will significantly lower your blood sugar if you lose some weight.” The Finnish Prevention Study and a study by Diabetes Prevention Program (see References at the end of the article for details) both prove that lifestyle changes that instigate a weight reduction of 5% (or more) decrease the overall risk of diabetes by as much as 58% in high-risk patients.
For those living with diabetes, studies have shown that a loss of 5–10% of body weight can improve fitness levels, reduce HbA1c levels, improve cardiovascular health, and decrease use of diabetes, hypertension, and lipid-lowering medications. That’s not all; diabetics who successfully lose weight also lower their risk of depression and sleep apnea.
People diagnosed with diabetes get a bundle of advice when it comes to weight loss. From magazine Continue reading

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7 ways to follow a low-carb diet the right way

7 ways to follow a low-carb diet the right way

Feeling "hangry," the combination of hungry and angry, is what I hear a lot from patients who believe all carbs are evil, and that if you want to control your blood sugar or lose weight, they all have to go.
Strong studies point to carbohydrate restriction as a main treatment for type 2 diabetes, but it doesn't have to be all or nothing. Many of my patients on very low-carb diets can’t sustain them long term. Eventually, they re-gain their weight and their blood-sugar problems come back. Those angry months of deprivation weren’t worth it.
There’s a better way, which involves keeping some of the foods you love, and as a result, maintaining your sanity.
Any time you eat a carbohydrate, your body has to redirect the glucose from your bloodstream to your cells. It calls on your pancreas, where insulin lives, to get the job done.
Insulin’s role is to take the glucose and distribute it to your muscle and fat cells, where it’s either used for energy or stored for fat. When everything goes right, insulin is your friend. Eat too much or consume the wrong things and insulin becomes your enemy. Excess insulin circulating in your body may cause you to gain weight. Here’s how to do low-carb right.
1. Plan your meals around lean proteins and healthy fats.
The reason many people fail at low-carb diets is because they are buying foods like low-carb chips, bars and drinks. These options are not always nutrient dense. They can leave you with a lack of satisfaction, increased hunger and the dreaded rebound binge.
Instead, opt for real food. Find options that make you less hungry a Continue reading

For the Last Time, I Have Type 1 Diabetes, Not Type 2 Diabetes! There’s a Big Difference

For the Last Time, I Have Type 1 Diabetes, Not Type 2 Diabetes! There’s a Big Difference

Here I go. But first, to all my brothers and sisters struggling with and managing Type 2 diabetes, my hat is off to all of you. As you endure the daily grind of judgment, fluctuating blood glucose levels, pain, diet, exercise, and scrutiny from society and loved ones, we, as Type 1s, empathize with you, but as you know, we are not you. Since you are strong in numbers, and we are not, (about 5 percent of the diabetes population), we ask that you stand with us and help us spread the word about the difference between your plight and ours. Remember that we are not trying to differentiate from you because we don’t understand what you go through on a daily basis, we just need a different set of diabetes social awareness and education.
That being said...
It was 1994 — I was a newly-hired diabetes sales representative, and I had an interesting conversation with a clinic doctor who was a month away from retirement at that time. Our conversation went something like this:
Well-Meaning Doctor: “You know, Peg. If you loose 10 pounds, you could go off insulin.”
Peg: “No. I have Type 1 diabetes.”
Well-Meaning-But-Now-Defensive Doctor: “That doesn’t matter. All you need to do is lose some weight and then you wouldn’t be on insulin.”
Peg: “No, Doc. I have Type 1 diabetes, not Type 2. It doesn’t matter how much I weigh, or what I eat, my kind of diabetes is always insulin-dependent, and I need it to stay alive.”
Appallingly-Uninformed-Doctor-Who-In-My-Personal-Opinion-Needed-To-Go-Back-To-Medical-School interrupts here: “You’re wrong! Just lose some weight and y Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes may be reversible with weight loss, study finds

Type 2 diabetes may be reversible with weight loss, study finds

A British study has found that type 2 diabetes could potentially be reversed through weight loss and with the long-term support of a medical professional.
The initial findings come from an ongoing trial study called DiRECT (Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial), which aims to find an effective accessible way to put type 2 diabetes into remission long-term.
Led by Prof. Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, and Prof. Mike Lean, from Glasgow University, the study recruited 298 people and gave half standard diabetes care from their GP, while the other half were placed on a structured weight management program which included a low calorie, nutrient-complete diet for three to five months, food reintroduction, and long-term support to maintain weight loss.
The team found that diabetes remission was closely linked with weight loss, with almost nine out of 10 people (86 per cent) who lost 15kg or more putting their type 2 diabetes into remission.
Over half (57 per cent) of those who lost 10 to 15kg also achieved remission, along with a third (34 per cent) of those who lost five to 10kg.
In comparison, only 4 per cent of the control group, who received standard care, achieved remission.
Prof. Taylor commented on the first year results saying, "These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated."
"The study builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. W Continue reading

What is Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test for Diabetes?

What is Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test for Diabetes?

In order to effectively manage diabetes, it is said that you need to keep the blood sugar level and the HbA1c levels under check. So, what is this HbA1c level? Is there a test for the same? The answers to all such questions shall be answered in the article that will follow. Join in for the article “What is Hemoglobin or HbA1c Test for Diabetes?”
What is the Test About?
Let us understand first why such a test is needed for diabetes patients in the first place. Well, as we know, it is very important for diabetes patients to continuously monitor their blood glucose levels. This test helps to monitor the blood glucose levels over the last two to three months. This test is not only useful in analyzing whether you have diabetes but also helps in understanding if any extra medication is required by the diabetes patient.
The test is known by different names such as HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, as well as glycohemoglobin.
What Does the HbA1c Test Tell You?
As per the results of the test, one can find out whether one is diabetic or not.
For healthy people, the hemoglobin A1c levels should be between 4% and 5.6%.
If your A1c levels are somewhere around 5.7% to 6.4%, it signifies that you have a higher risk of contracting diabetes.
Anything above 6.4% of the A1c level will mean that you already have diabetes.
Let’s understand the good and bad level of hb(A1C) by below chart:
For conducting the test, a sample of the blood is usually taken from the patient’s arms. Also, in a few known cases, a sample of a single drop of blood may also be taken in order to check the level of h Continue reading

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