diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Heart Disease In Women

Diabetes and Heart Disease in Women

Diabetes and Heart Disease in Women

Dr. Rodriguez-Oquendo’s area of expertise is endocrinology.
Cardiovascular risk can occur earlier in women with diabetes
Among both men and women, diabetes is one of the strongest cardiovascular risk factors. Epidemiological studies have shown that people with diabetes have more than two times the chance of getting cardiovascular disease than people without diabetes. This includes premenopausal women, a group normally at lower risk for cardiovascular disease.
“Men generally have heart disease in their 40’s and 50’s, about a decade before women. But this is generally not true for diabetic women,” says Dr. Annabelle Rodriguez-Oquendo, Associate Professor of Medicine and Diabetes Management Service Director at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. “For diabetic women, the cardiovascular risk occurs earlier. Diabetes takes away much of the protection premenopausal women would normally get from estrogen.”
How diabetes raises risk for heart disease
The concentration of blood glucose or blood sugar, and how much it sticks to red blood cells and impedes the flow of oxygen in the blood, plays a large role in cardiovascular risk. An important measurement of sugar in the blood over a three-month period is the hemoglobin A1C test.
Hemoglobin is just one of the proteins that transport oxygen in the blood. Diabetes is a disease that impacts large blood vessels (such as the coronary arteries) and small vessels (such as arteries that carry blood to nerve endings and kidneys). Diabetes can affect the cardiovascular system by:
Attaching glucose to (glycosylating) blood proteins Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Lower Blood Sugar Naturally to Prevent High Blood Sugar from Leading to Diabetes

Lower Blood Sugar Naturally to Prevent High Blood Sugar from Leading to Diabetes

If you have high blood sugar, it doesn't mean you will get diabetes, but it is a big red flag warning you that it's probable if you don't make some lifestyle changes. We all know someone, or have had someone in the family, who is diabetic, and have heard about the insulin shots, poor circulation and feet problems that come along with it, so it's well understood that prediabetes is a condition to take seriously. Fortunately, the Beyond Diet program has proven to be an effective way to lower blood sugar naturally.
In case you aren't familiar with the term "prediabetes," also known as impaired glucose tolerance, it means that your blood sugar is higher than normal. It's not a disease in itself, but a condition that indicates that the onset of diabetes is likely, and the internal damage to your heart and other organs associated with diabetes could already be starting. Sorry for the heavy note, but it's important to understand, and the good news is that we are right here with the solution.
A Blood Sugar Diet Is Not What You Think
You know that natural ways to lower blood sugar are going to include the basics of self care, but if you are resistant to managing your diet and exercising, we understand! It can be hard to get motivated to exercise after a day of work, and you've probably suffered through unpleasant diets in vain attempts at losing weight in the past. After all, who hasn't? And to make matters worse, after the dreaded diet finally comes to an end, the pounds creep right back on, often without even having the courtesy to wait a month or two before showing themselves aga Continue reading

Diabetes Mellitus Treatment

Diabetes Mellitus Treatment

In patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM), the therapeutic focus is on preventing complications caused by hyperglycemia. In the United States, 57.9% of patients with diabetes have one or more diabetes-related complications and 14.3% have three or more.[1] Strict control of glycemia within the established recommended values is the primary method for reducing the development and progression of many complications associated with microvascular effects of diabetes (eg, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), while aggressive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension further decreases the cardiovascular complications associated macrovascular effects.[2-4] See the chapter on diabetes: Macro- and microvascular effects.
Glycemic Control
Two primary techniques are available to assess a patient's glycemic control: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and interval measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).
Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose
Use of SMBG is an effective method to evaluate short-term glycemic control. It helps patients and physicians assess the effects of food, medications, stress, and activity on blood glucose levels. For patients with type 1 DM or insulin-dependent type 2 DM, clinical trials have demonstrated that SMBG plays a role in effective glycemic control because it helps to refine and adjust insulin doses by monitoring for and preventing asymptomatic hypoglycemia as well as preprandial and postprandial hyperglycemia.[2,5-7]
The frequency of SMBG depends on the type of medical therapy, risk for hypoglycemia, and need for short-term adjustment of therapy. Continue reading

How to Avoid Diabetes Naturally

How to Avoid Diabetes Naturally

Q: I feel moody a lot, and it’s not just PMS. I also crave sweets. I think these are related! What can I do? —Jane P., Seattle
A: We’ve all heard the saying, “everything in moderation.” It may seem banal, but it’s actually sage advice. Humans work best with routines. Go to bed and arise at the same time; brush your teeth morning and night; set aside 30 minutes for exercise each day; and so on. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be spontaneous from time to time, but a regular, stable routine can make all the difference in the world to your outlook, and your health.
This is especially true of blood sugar—one of the most important aspects of our physiology that needs stability. The key is keeping track of blood sugar levels and how different foods affect them. Glucometers are widely available and inexpensive, though the test strips can be costly.
A morning reading, after fasting overnight for 8 hours, should be under 100 ng/mL, but 75–90 is better. Below 60 suggests hypoglycemia, a different problem that requires professional support. More often, however, Americans carry a high blood sugar load, and we currently have an epidemic of diabetes in this country. Unfortunately, this is mostly due to the awful “food” we eat, especially processed grains (cereal, chips, pasta, crackers, donuts, bagels, white bread, cake, cupcakes), and poor-quality fats (found in everything from salad dressings to fried foods).
After eating, it’s normal for blood sugar to rise, up to over 140. But 2 hours later (or 3 hours, later in pregnant women), blood sugar should return Continue reading

How Not to Die from Diabetes

How Not to Die from Diabetes

Kendra: fair questions and I am glad that you are preoccupied by these issues, as you should be.
Let’s think about what are we trying to achieve here: lower blood sugar levels after meals, shorter spikes, better A1C, and I do not know if that is your case, but possibly some weight loss. In addition, the goal also is to protect your organism from damage from the high sugar spikes, such as damage to the blood vessels or kidneys.
This is why, whenever in doubt about a certain food, think: will it help my goal or not? With that in mind, let’s go over your questions.
Processed food are truly foods that have been altered from their natural state: for instance ground flour, even 100% whole grain, is processed because it was ground. Is that fact important to your goal? Yes, because, once the grain is broken in thousands of pieces by grinding, your digestive enzymes get to reach it thousands of times faster, therefore the flour carbohydrate is broken down into sugars and released in the blood much faster, so you can experience the sugar spike.
Is it better than the white flour? Yes it is, because it still contains the bran i.e. the fiber, that was found to delay enzymatic action and the sugar spike would be blunter. Is it better than eating cracked wheat or whole wheat kernel, which would be the true “whole food”? No, it is not. The whole food will always prevail.
About the 100% whole grain breads and even the Zeroodle products (they don’t seem to contain additives, I saw just black bean and water as ingredients in pasta, not bad), got to ask yourself what does that do to Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles