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Diabetes: An Opportunity To Have A Lasting Impact On Health Through Lifestyle Modification

Diabetes: An Opportunity to Have a Lasting Impact on Health Through Lifestyle Modification

Diabetes: An Opportunity to Have a Lasting Impact on Health Through Lifestyle Modification


Diabetes: An Opportunity to Have a Lasting Impact on Health Through Lifestyle Modification
Hena N. Patel, MD; Andrew M. Freeman, MD, FACC; and Kim A. Williams MD, FACC
Can Yoga, Mindfulness Fit With Managed Care?
Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > March 2017 Published on: March 03, 2017
Diabetes: An Opportunity to Have a Lasting Impact on Health Through Lifestyle Modification
Hena N. Patel, MD; Andrew M. Freeman, MD, FACC; and Kim A. Williams MD, FACC
Three cardiologists, including the 2015-2016 president of the American College of Cardiology, review the evidence in support of lifestyle modification for diabetes management or remission.
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a costly chronic illness that is increasing in prevalence and associated with significant health problems, including cardiovascular disease (CVD).1 In fact, CVD is listed as the cause of death in nearly 65% of individuals with diabetes.2
Historically, T2D was labeled a coronary artery disease equivalentin light of the 7-year risk of myocardial infarction (MI) equaling that of a person without diabetes who is post-MI3 in the restatin-treatment era and the marked improvement in adverse cardiac events with statin therapy.4 Given this grave prognosis, and with longstanding work showing diabetes remission from lifestyle interventions as far back as the 1940s,5there is no better and more economical way to treat this epidemic.
Diabetes and CVD share multiple modifiable lifestyle risk factors, such as obesity and physical inactivity, that tend to comingle for many adults, adding to the threat of severe advers Continue reading

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Hard Rock Pins, just because

Hard Rock Pins, just because


Posted by Rick Phillips on May 19, 2017 in General | 10 comments
Today is the fifth day of Diabetes Blog week. Each day we have a prompt and are called to post a response. You can read all responses at my friend Karens site Bitter~Sweet . Also, please remember RABlog week will occur in September. I hope you join the fun then as well.
Lets wrap up the week by sharing a little more about ourselves, beyond the chronic illness we or our loved ones live with. Share an interest, hobby, passion, something that is YOU. If you want to explore how it relates to or helps with diabetes you can. Or let it be a part of you that is completely separate from diabetes because there is more to life than just diabetes! (This topic is a suggestion from the 2016 #DBlogWeek survey.)
I come from a family of collectors of silly things. The collection bug was best exemplified by my father who at some point decided to collect matchbook covers. Dad could not explain his collection, why he did it or what the end game would be. He understood they had no real value, but his collection was not about value. It was about things. He collected these for several years and then cold turkey, it was over. He no longer had interest. The collection at the end numbered a few thousand, all sorted and categorized in perfect, pristine form. There it sat for years. An object of great passion for a time but my dad ultimately grew tired of it. At the end of his life, he called his grandsons together and said this is now yours and he divided them up. No thought was given if they wanted them or not, I was wily enough Continue reading

The Big Interview – Dr Trudi Deakin

The Big Interview – Dr Trudi Deakin

Dr Trudi Deakin is well known for writing the X-PERT Programmes, which are based upon the theories of empowerment, discovery learning and patient-centred care for type 2 diabetes.
People with diabetes see a healthcare professional for around three hours each year and have to spend the remaining 8,757 hours self-managing their condition.
Also a research dietitian Dr Deakin has written books on low-carb eating which she recommends is an important part of diabetes control.
What’s been your biggest achievement?
Developing, implementing and evaluating the X-PERT Programme and demonstrating that it is making a difference to the health and wellbeing of people with pre diabetes and diabetes (newly diagnosed and established) throughout the UK and Ireland.
The start of the journey was recognition (whilst working as a NHS registered dietitian) that people did not understand diabetes or have the knowledge, skills and confidence to successfully self-manage it.
This led to instigating focus groups with groups of patients to ascertain what information they wanted and how they would like this information to be delivered. I developed the X-PERT Diabetes Programme as part of my doctorate to meet identified needs and evaluated it with a clinical trial.
The results demonstrated highly statistically significant improvements in clinical, lifestyle and psychosocial outcomes. It was an honour to be awarded the Secretary of States Award titled Excellence in Healthcare Management for driving forward diabetes services and making a difference to the lives of people with diabetes.
Thus provided the c Continue reading

Wasting Money on Diabetes Education That Fails to Teach the Right Things

Wasting Money on Diabetes Education That Fails to Teach the Right Things


What is a bit shocking, however, is that this expansion of diabetes is happening right in the midst of some of the best academic and research health institutions in the country. Texas is home to MD Anderson Cancer Center , Baylor College of Medicine , UT Health Science Center , Memorial Hermann Hospital , The Methodist Hospital , Texas Childrens Hospital , and University of Houston College of Pharmacy .
On the other hand, the fact is that Texas is not very different than other states in America. We have become a nation of diabetics! One in 4 adults over 65 in the US is already diabetic and 1 in 3 over age 20 is prediabetic. By 2050, one-third of all Americans could be diabetic!!!
So why is this $2 million research grant not such good news?
The Third Ward, one of the six historic wards of Houston, is a predominantly African American community of over 13,000 people as of 2011. The program envisioned in this grant is to take education and treatment out into the Third Ward by 1) establishing a community advisory group, 2) conducting health fairs at different locations, 3) offering lessons on how to live and eat healthier, and 4) screening to detect susceptible individuals early. The objectives are to treat those who already have and to prevent others from getting it, according to Ezemenari Obasi, director of the HEALTH institute. (The name of this institute is an acronym for Helping Everyone Achieve a Lifetime of Health.)
My answer is: it depends on what it is educating people about, and if it has any effect. And if you look at the rising epidemic of diabetes, it appears Continue reading

Sanofi falls short in Q3 as diabetes and MS sales disappoint

Sanofi falls short in Q3 as diabetes and MS sales disappoint


Sanofi falls short in Q3 as diabetes and MS sales disappoint
Sanofi is counting on innovations in MS and other fast-growing markets to fuel its growth.
To make up for a slow and painful decline of its aging diabetes unit, Sanofi has been counting on newer market entrieslike Aubagio and Lemtrada to treat multiple sclerosis. And during the third quarter, both drugs did see their sales grow19% and 5% respectively, in fact. But that wasnt enough to ease investors fears that the French drug giants innovation engine may not be able to outpace the diabetes decline.
Aubagio brought in 382 million ($445 million) during the quarter, while Lemtrada sales were 113 million ($132million). Both numbers came in below analysts expectations. The companys overall sales of 9.05 billion ($10.55 billion) also fell short of the average forecast of 9.26 billion. Sanofis net income was 1.6 billion ($1.9 billion), or 1.71 ($1.99) per share, up 1% year over year, and the company reiterated its guidance that earnings for the full year would be flat over last year.
Sanofis diabetes franchise has been hammered by a combination of patent expirations and pricing pressure on newer productsin the U.S. Last year, both CVS and United Health removed Sanofis insulin mainstay, Lantus from their formularies, replacing it with Eli Lillys Basaglar, a cheaper biosimilar. Sanofis diabetes sales have dropped 20% in the U.S. year-to-date, and the company warned of an accelerated decline in the fourth quarter as the full impact of the CVS and United exclusions hits.
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