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Diabetes Alert: Biotin And Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels

Diabetes Alert: Biotin and Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels

Diabetes Alert: Biotin and Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels


Diabetes Alert: Biotin and Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels
Diabetes affects people worldwide and can be incredibly difficult to manage. The significant impact that this condition has on the body can lead to severe fatigue, pain in the extremities, and fluctuations in weight. Because these symptoms can be debilitating, combatting them and the condition that causes them can be frustrating. One of the greatest challenges that comes with a diabetic condition is regulating blood sugar levels. This is further exaggerated for those who are obese. Thankfully, as more information becomes available regarding diabetes, better means of treatment are becoming known.
A great deal of research has been put into understanding and treating diabetes but many who suffer from this condition still have trouble managing proper blood sugar levels. Eating right, properly medicating, and being mindful of ones insulin and glucose levels are important in combatting diabetes. Even if someone is successfully doing these, they may feel as though they need more assistance. Fortunately, there are elements available that further aid in keeping blood glucose balanced. Studies have found that biotin and chromium provide notable benefits for those looking to combat diabetes.
Vitamin B7, also known as biotin, belongs in the powerful family of B complex vitamins . This group is known for aiding various bodily functions that promote better health. Biotin is of particular interest for diabetics because of the role it plays in regulating blood sugar levels, the metabolization of fatty acids, and glucose p Continue reading

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Sensing the Big Picture With Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Sensing the Big Picture With Continuous Glucose Monitoring


Sensing the Big Picture With Continuous Glucose Monitoring
by By Laura Hieronymus, DNP, MSEd, RN, MLDE, BC-ADM, CDE, FAADE, and Angela Hepner, MEd, RD, LD, MLDE, CDE, CDTC
When you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose is a crucial part of your treatment plan. Knowing your blood glucose values can help you avoid short-term problems such as hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). Ongoing optimal blood glucose control can help you prevent or delay long-term diabetes complications such as diabetes-related eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage.
Blood glucose monitors (often called meters) are such mainstays of diabetes care that most insurers, including Medicare, cover their cost. Certain conditions typically limit how often you can get a new meter and the amount of supplies that are covered on a daily basis. In some cases, this may restrict the frequency of your monitoring. To help make the most out of the supplies you have, work with your diabetes care team to determine the optimal times of day to check your blood glucose.
In less than two decades, the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes has gained popularity worldwide. This is largely due to improvement in the technology, the reliability of the information, and ease of use. A CGM system uses a tiny sensor less than one inch long inserted just below the skin. An electrode measures your blood glucose levels within the tissue fluid rather than directly from your blood. A transmitter attached to the sensor sends blood glucose information to a w Continue reading

Termination of pregnancy and sterilisation in women with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes

Termination of pregnancy and sterilisation in women with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes


, Volume 60, Issue12 , pp 23772383 | Cite as
Termination of pregnancy and sterilisation in women with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes
The aim of this study was to explore the association between type 1 diabetes and reproductive health indicators in women, focusing on termination of pregnancy and sterilisation.
We conducted a registry-based cohort study involving 2281 women with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes, matched for age and birthplace with women without diabetes: two control participants for each woman with diabetes. We compared the frequencies of termination of pregnancy and sterilisation over a 25year period between women with type 1 diabetes and women without, and estimated standardised incidence ratios (SIRs). Smoothed age and period effects in the incidence of termination of pregnancy or sterilisation were tested statistically.
There were more terminations of pregnancy (SIR 1.67; 95% CI 1.51, 1.86) and sterilisations (SIR 1.69; 95% CI 1.56, 1.83) in women with diabetes than in control women. During recent years, sterilisations in women with diabetes have decreased and the difference compared with control women has vanished. The indications for both procedures showed a statistically highly significant difference: maternal medical indications were almost absent (<1%) in procedures among control women, but comprised 23.6% of terminations of pregnancy and 22.9% of sterilisations in women with diabetes.
The indications for termination of pregnancy and sterilisation are different in women with diabetes compared with other women. Pregnancies in women with type 1 Continue reading

Travel Like a Pro with Nature Made Daily Diabetes Health Pack!

Travel Like a Pro with Nature Made Daily Diabetes Health Pack!


Travel Like a Pro with Nature Made Daily Diabetes Health Pack!
(This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias, Inc. and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone. #NatureMadeHealthPack #CollectiveBias
Please note, this blog does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult with your healthcare practitioner.)
This week marks the beginning of easily my favorite time of year: Summer! While it takes me a bit to adjust to these temperatures heating up (94 today, and going up as the week goes on), Summer always means fun events, lighter evenings, and a road trip or two (of course).
As my date book fills up with more day trips, weekend adventures and some further travels in the works, one thing is always for sure: I need to plan accordingly when we go away. I am the Queen of forgetting something, and have learned (the hard way) to make check lists and notes when I go shopping pre-road trip adventures.
Since last weekend found us in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, and I knew I needed to stay organized, I made a check list to ensure nothing was forgotten on our little road trip up the California Coast, and, have to admit, I forget how into check lists I am If youre a fellow forgetter, read on as I list some common essentials that we should remember when packing for a little fun in the sun!
SNACKS. BECAUSE YOU DONT WANT A HANGRY MARY TO COME ALONG.
Whether it be a protein bar, fruit, almonds, I need to have a healthy munchies at the ready. And, who doesnt want to munch on a road trip? Which, brings me to my 2nd must-have
Ive been a Type 1 since I Continue reading

How to Get Diabetes Drugs for Free

How to Get Diabetes Drugs for Free


By Jeemin Kwon, Ann Carracher, and Kelly Close
If you meet certain income and insurance requirements, you may be eligible for assistance programs that offer free prescriptions check to see if you qualify!
Many people know that some drug manufacturers have Patient Assistance Programs (PAPs) to make prescription diabetes drugs free for those who meet certain eligibility requirements. Weve done a six-month-long project looking into these programs to better understand how they are similar, how they are different, and who they can and cant help. These programs are usually reserved for individuals without private insurance or full Medicare benefits, but some programs review applications on a case-by-case basis.
Finding information about these programs can be difficult, and even when you find the information, PAPs often have complicated income, insurance, and prescription requirements. In this article, we break down current PAPs in the US by manufacturer and give the details to help you find the right program. Click to jump down to a section:
Each PAP program has a similar free application, regardless of the drug that you want help with DPP-4 inhibitors , GLP-1 agonists , SGLT-2 inhibitors , or basal or fast acting insulin , all of which are particularly expensive diabetes drugs that PAPs can help with. There is one portion to be filled out by the person who has been prescribed the drugs, and another to be completed by a doctor or nurse or one of their team. All programs require a prescription, but the applications vary in whether proof of income or particular insurance do Continue reading

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