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CRISPR Skin Grafts Could Replace Insulin Shots For Diabetes

CRISPR Skin Grafts Could Replace Insulin Shots For Diabetes

CRISPR Skin Grafts Could Replace Insulin Shots For Diabetes

The potential of the gene editing tool CRISPR just seems to keep growing and growing, and the latest experimental use of the technology is creating skin grafts that trigger the release of insulin and help manage diabetes.
Researchers have successfully tested the idea with mice that gained less weight and showed a reversed resistance to insulin because of the grafts (high insulin resistance is a common precursor to type 2 diabetes).
In fact, the team from the University of Chicago says the same approach could eventually be used to treat a variety of metabolic and genetic conditions, not just diabetes – it's a question of using skin cells to trigger different chemical reactions in the body.
"We didn't cure diabetes, but it does provide a potential long-term and safe approach of using skin epidermal stem cells to help people with diabetes and obesity better maintain their glucose levels," says one of the researchers, Xiaoyang Wu.
If you're new to the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) phenomenon, it's a new and innovative way of editing specific genes in the body, using a biological copy and paste technique: it can do everything from cut out HIV virus DNA to slow the growth of cancer cells.
For this study, researchers used CRISPR to alter the gene responsible for encoding a hormone called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which triggers the release of insulin and then helps remove excess glucose from the blood.
Type 2 diabetes comes about due to a lack of insulin, also known as insulin resistance.
Using CRISPR, the GLP-1 gene could be tweaked t Continue reading

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Turmeric Extract 100% Effective At Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, ADA Journal Study Finds

Turmeric Extract 100% Effective At Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, ADA Journal Study Finds

A remarkable human clinical study published in the journal Diabetes Care, the journal of the American Diabetes Association, revealed that turmeric extract was 100% successful at preventing prediabetic patients from becoming diabetic over the course of a 9-month intervention.[1]
Performed by Thailand researchers, the study's primary object was to assess the efficacy of curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric which gives the spice its golden hue, in delaying the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a prediabetic population.
The study design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial including 240 subjects who met the American Diabetic Association's criteria for prediabetes. All subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 250 mg of curcuminoid or placebo capsules for 9 months.
Type 2 diabetes progression was assessed by measuring a wide range of parameters, including changes in the insulin-producing cells within the pancreas known as β-cells, insulin resistance, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine known as adiponectin, at four different times: baseline, 3-, 6-, and 9-month visits during the course of intervention.
The results were reported as follows:
"After 9 months of treatment, 16.4% of subjects in the placebo group were diagnosed with T2DM, whereas none were diagnosed with T2DM in the curcumin-treated group. In addition, the curcumin-treated group showed a better overall function of β-cells, with higher HOMA-β (61.58 vs. 48.72; P < 0.01) and lower C-peptide (1.7 vs. 2.17; P < 0.05). The curcumin-treated group showed a lower level o Continue reading

I'm slim so why am I at risk of diabetes?

I'm slim so why am I at risk of diabetes?

Diabetes is on the rise around the world, and nowhere more rapidly than in developing countries that are adopting the sugary, starchy diet that has plagued the richer world for years. And it turns out that Asians, and especially South Asians, are particularly vulnerable.
The nutritionist runs a white measuring tape around my waist. I defy the urge to suck in my stomach.
I'm 42 years old, a mother of two and a journalist based in India's capital, Delhi, currently one of the world's most polluted cities. I eat organic food, rarely snack, and consider myself pretty slim and active, especially compared to my American friends, whom I can see on Facebook are generally twice my girth.
"It's 87cm (34.25in)," says Chaya Ranasinghe, nutritionist at Sri Lanka's National Diabetes Centre. I'm here to find out why slim-looking Indians and Sri Lankans are increasingly falling victim to type 2 diabetes - a disease we tend to associate with people who anyone could see were obese.
"Yes, but it should be 80cm (31.5in) maximum," she replies. "You are 7cm (2.75in) over."
"Should have sucked in my waist," I fume belatedly.
Chaya is helping me assess my risk for diabetes and the waist measurement is key for people of Asian origin. That's because Asian genes dictate that fat is laid down in the abdominal area.
It's this "visceral" or belly fat, as well as fat inside the liver, that puts us at risk.
"Imaging technology that measures fat in humans has shown that Asians of a healthy BMI have more fat around organs and in the belly area than Europeans with the same BMI, thereby increasing risk," accor Continue reading

This Simple Leaf Prevents Stroke, Hypertension, Diabetes, Alzheimer’s And More

This Simple Leaf Prevents Stroke, Hypertension, Diabetes, Alzheimer’s And More

Scientists have long tested olive leaf extract for its beneficial properties and found that it is efficient against diseases. The benefits provided by olive leaves range from protecting both cardiovascular and immune system to boosting energy, promoting healthy blood pressure, preventing diabetes and Alzheimer’s.
Olives are cultivated in Mediterranean countries, and they are also grown in South Australia, Peru, and Chile, but they are native to Syria and Asia. Olive leaves were used to mummify pharaohs, and their medicinal properties were first used in ancient Egypt. Olive leaves were also a symbol of divine power.
Back in the 1800s, olive pulverised leaves were added to drinks that were supposed to lower fever, and just a few decades later, green olive leaves were used as tea in the treatment of malaria.
Taking into consideration all studies and testings, we can freely say that supplemental olive leaves are useful in the treatment of conditions triggered by protozoan, retrovirus, virus or bacteria, meaning olive leaves are efficient in treating candida, meningitis, encephalitis, influenza, human herpes virus 6 and 7, hepatitis B, pneumonia, common cold, Epstein – Barr virus (EBV), herpes I and II, shingles (Herpes zoster), malaria, dengue, chronic fatigue, tuberculosis, gonorrhea, severe diarrhea, urinary and ear infections, dental surgical infections and HIV/ARC/AIDS.
Oleuropein (pronounced O-lee-u-ro-peen) is a bitter substance found in olive leaves. It was first isolated in the early 1900s. In 1962, an Italian researcher found that oleuropein can lower blood pressur Continue reading

New fitness tracker could take the sting out of monitoring diabetes

New fitness tracker could take the sting out of monitoring diabetes

New fitness tracker technology could help diabetics better monitor their blood glucose levels.
Final testing is underway for a wristband device which will be able to measure blood sugar without the need for finger pricking.
Wayne Maddren was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes four years ago. He's supposed to test his blood sugar levels three times a day, but doesn't like pricking his fingers.
"I am probably not that good at doing that," says Mr Maddren. "I get quite slack, I might miss out on two or three days. The other thing too is that your fingers get very sore."
He admits his 'she'll be right' attitude isn't good for his health.
"It was only about two weeks ago I wasn't monitoring himself at all very well and I started back again and I was quite shocked at the level my blood sugars were at."
Wearable technology is big business - the industry is predicted to be worth $45 billion by 2020, and the technology is about to get even smarter.
As well as measuring steps and heart beats, the Helo wristband will soon add new features, including a blood sugar sensor which uses infra-red light.
"That's going to be good for anybody with a blood glucose condition but also people that are leading up to that as well," says Helo spokesperson Clare Williamson.
The Helo device, which pairs with a smart phone app, will set users back around $270.
The idea is that people with diabetes or pre-diabetes can monitor the effects their lifestyle choices have on their blood sugar.
"Self-care is the new healthcare, and this really is about becoming self-reliant," Ms Williamson says.
The makers warn it' Continue reading

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