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Crash Course Diet Reverses Type 2 Diabetes In A Week

Crash course diet reverses Type 2 diabetes in a week

Crash course diet reverses Type 2 diabetes in a week

Adhering to the strict 600 calorie-a-day diet causes fat levels in the pancreas to plummet, restoring normal function, found Prof Roy Taylor of Newcastle University.
The discovery, a "radical change" in understanding of the condition, holds out the possibility that sufferers could cure themselves - if they have the willpower.
Until recently received medical wisdom was that Type 2 diabetes was largely irreversible.
But this small-scale study indicates that defeating it could be easier than commonly thought.
Prof Taylor asked 11 volunteers, all recently diagnosed, to go on what he admitted was an "extreme diet" of specially formulated drinks and non-starchy vegetables, for eight weeks.
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After just a week, pre-breakfast ('fasting') blood sugar levels had returned to normal, suggesting a resumption of correct pancreas function.
After eight weeks, all had managed to reverse their diabetes. Three months on, seven remained free of it.
Prof Taylor explained that too much fat "clogged up" the operation of the pancreas at a cellular level, preventing normal secretion of insulin which regulates blood sugar.
When this fat was removed - by way of the diet - normal function resumed.
He said: "This is a radical change in understanding Type 2 diabetes. It will change how we can explain it to people newly diagnosed with the condition.
"While it has lo Continue reading

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Turns Out Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, After All

Turns Out Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible, After All

If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, no doubt you've been told to change your eating habits (more veggies, less sweets) and get more exercise. These actions were thought to control your diabetes but not to reverse it.
But a paper published in The BMJ says that Type 2 diabetes is indeed reversible for many Type 2 diabetes patients who lose around 15 kilograms, or 33 pounds.
Diabetes is a chronic disease that has been rising rapidly throughout the world. It affected 8.5 percent of the world's population in 2014 (about 422 million people), up from 4.7 percent in 1980.
The most common form of diabetes is Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset diabetes. It occurs when the body doesn't effectively use the insulin it produces (insulin is the hormone that regulates blood sugar.) If your blood sugar level is too high and not treated, it can lead to severe problems, like blindness, stroke, kidney failure and foot amputations. Type 2 diabetes is almost always directly tied to physical inactivity and extra body weight.
"The belief amongst doctors and scientists is that Type 2 diabetes is irreversible, always gets steadily worse, demanding more and more drugs, then insulin. Patient groups advise that the first step for someone newly diagnosed is to get used to the idea of dealing with a life-long illness," explains paper co-author Roy Taylor, professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom in an email interview. His research is the latest chapter in years' worth of investigation about Type 2 diabetes.
In 2006, he noticed that liver function test Continue reading

BREAKING: Diabetes Drugs Linked to Alzheimers and Dementia

BREAKING: Diabetes Drugs Linked to Alzheimers and Dementia

If you’re diabetic and you’re taking medication, you’re probably putting your brain at great risk.
Their calling the new study from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine a “Diabetes Game-Changer." It proves that prolonged use of diabetes drugs puts you at risk for a deficiency which can cause neurological problems, including dementia, and even brain shrinkage.
This study used data that was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes. This was a 5-year study that ran from 1996 until 2001. It followed more than 3,000 people who were “at risk” for diabetes.
Participants were divided into three groups.
Group #1 was assigned a special lifestyle change method. They were put on a very specific diet and performed light exercises.
Group #2 was given the diabetes drug metformin.
Group #3 was given a placebo.
The purpose of this study was to see which group had the lowest rates of diabetes and took the longest to develop it. Group #1 beat the others by a landslide.
The study authors were so astounded by their findings that the program morphed into a follow-up study, in which the original participants were followed for several more years.
The researchers found that Group #2 (those taking metformin) were twice as likely as to have a B12 deficiency, and more likely to become anemic.
More shocking yet, it was discovered that they were also more likely to develop neurological problems like Alzheimer’s and Dementia.
Yet, for unknown reasons, the Diabetes-Institute-funded research didn’t follow up on the special diet procedure completed by Group #1.
It’s everywhere, dang Continue reading

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible at Scale?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible at Scale?

If you’re reading this, you probably know that I’m obsessed with longevity. But to really understand longevity, you must understand metabolic health, insulin resistance and, by extension, one of its end-results: type 2 diabetes (T2D). Though my medical practice does not focus on type 2 diabetes, I have taken care of several patients with T2D over the past few years. When I was in medical school I was taught many things about T2D, but one stands out most: T2D is incurable, I was told. Once you have it, you’ve always got it, and the best one can do is “manage” it as a chronic—but irreversible—condition.
But is this really true? Asked another way, is T2D reversible?
My obsession is partly due to my personal journey to better metabolic health, which I’ve documented elsewhere on this blog, and spoken about publicly. But those facts alone, don’t fully explain why I wanted to be involved with Virta Health (I’ll get to them shortly). T2D is a massive societal problem that has the potential to literally bankrupt countries: More than 29 million Americans have T2D and more than 80 million are pre-diabetic. And whether you view it through the lens of population health, or the lens of an individual patient, T2D is perhaps the biggest healthcare challenge of our generation.
At the population level, T2D costs Americans more than $300 billion per year: one of every three Medicare dollars is spent on T2D, and one of every six healthcare dollars is spent on T2D. At the individual level, patients and payers (employers and insurance companies) spend thousands of dollars (of Continue reading

Type Two Diabetes is Reversible

Type Two Diabetes is Reversible

Type two diabetes is curable if you ignore your doctor’s advice. Diabetes is not the hopeless disease that most doctors would have us believe it is though it is a long losing battle if you walk the trail western medicine wants you to travel.
Like all the chronic diseases, the western medical establishment does not want you or your doctor to become conscious of the real causes of diabetes and it certainly does not want you to receive treatments that will prevent diabetes from destroying your life.
Hard but true words to define the nature of most diabetic care. One out of three Americans now alive will have the diagnosis before they die writes Dr. Mary Vernon so it is incredibly important for us to understand what causes diabetes and what to do about it.
There are doctors who do cure diabetes and how do they do it? The first thing such doctors understand is that diabetes is inflammatory disease caused by a combination of factors including stress, chemical and heavy metal toxicity, radiation exposure, magnesium, iodine and bicarbonate deficiencies; and nutritional imbalances focused on excessive carbohydrate intake that all come together to burn down the cellular house in slow motion. Sugar excess and dehydration work to create inflammation in the body and this starts a long process that ends up with people facing major diseases including cancer.
“Monitoring of blood-sugar levels, insulin production, acid-base balance, and pancreatic bicarbonate and enzyme production before and after test exposures to potentially allergic substances reveals that the pancreas is the first o Continue reading

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