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Common Diabetes Medications Can Cause Heart Failure

Common Diabetes Medications Can Cause Heart Failure

Common Diabetes Medications Can Cause Heart Failure

Medications used to help diabetics manage their blood sugar could increase their risk for heart failure, according to research presented recently at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session.
The study found that newer or more intensive drugs for blood sugar management were linked to a 14 percent overall increased risk for heart failure. Drugs in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors class, or PPAR agonists – like Actos or Avandia – were associated with the highest risk. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, like Januvia, were associated with intermediate risk of heart failure, while long-acting insulins like Lantus were associated with "neutral" risk.
"This increased risk was directly associated with the type of diabetes therapy that was chosen, with some drugs more likely to cause heart failure than others, compared with placebo or standard care," said Dr. Jacob Udell, lead study investigator.
Heart disease is still the number one cause of death globally, and it is also the primary cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes, according to the American Heart Association.
Weight management is key
A common side effect of many blood sugar lowering medications is weight gain, which could be the most dangerous outcome for patients taking these drugs: The study found that every 1 kilogram (about 2 pounds) of weight gain associated with taking a blood sugar medication was linked to a 7 percent increased risk of heart failure.
While blood sugar medications are a common first approach for patients with diabetes, other lifestyle intervent Continue reading

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Statin scam exposed: Cholesterol drugs cause rapid aging, brain damage and diabetes

Statin scam exposed: Cholesterol drugs cause rapid aging, brain damage and diabetes

Statins, the widely prescribed class of drugs said to lower “bad” cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart problems, has recently come under fire after a study revealed that they destroy human health more than they work to improve it.
Sadly, many people take statin drugs, which are commonly known by brand names including Lipitor, Crestor and Zocor. Prescription drug spending in the U.S. shot up to about $374 billion in 2014, representing the highest level of spending since 2001. Statins undoubtedly made up a significant portion of this spending, and now consumers who take such drugs have much more to worry about than the dent it’s making in their wallets.
The study, which was published in the American Journal of Physiology, states that statins’ “…impact on other biologic properties of stem cells provides a novel explanation for their adverse clinical effects.” Specifically, the study states that such adverse effects include advancing the “process of aging” and also notes that “…long-term use of statins has been associated with adverse effects including myopathy, neurological side effects and an increased risk of diabetes.” Myopathy refers to skeletal muscle weakness.
Experts involved in the study suggest that the health problems associated with statins have likely been downplayed through the years. In reality, those taking such cholesterol-lowering drugs have been experiencing cataracts, fatigue, liver problems, muscle pain and memory loss. Simply put, the drugs have been found to tamper with cells in such a way that their primary purpose of reproduc Continue reading

Can cough syrup treat diabetes?

Can cough syrup treat diabetes?

An ingredient in many over-the-counter cough syrup remedies may help to improve the body's insulin response, according to a new study.
Dextromethorphan is a compound that acts as a cough suppressant, but researchers found it also produces a byproduct that increases the release of insulin from the pancreas. This is the exact opposite of what researchers thought the drug would do.
Affecting N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors, dextromethorphan stimulated insulin release in both animal and human pancreatic tissue sample cells. A small group of 20 diabetic patients were also given the drug and monitored for insulin changes during a single-dose clinical trial.
A future treatment for type 2 diabetes?
The study authors don't suggest diabetics self-medicate with cough syrup, as the participant pool for the research was small and the results don't provide sufficient evidence of a treatment quite yet.
"My hope is that our study triggers further clinical trials at established diabetes centers," senior study author Eckhard Lammert told Live Science.
Other drugs that act on NMDA-receptors might also be an area of study to explore if dextromethorphan is found to be an ineffective treatment method, the researchers said.
The study is published in the journal Nature Medicine.
Source: Live Science
Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up.
Type 2 diabet Continue reading

5 Female Celebrities That Have Diabetes

5 Female Celebrities That Have Diabetes

While some celebrities aren't quick to talk about living with diabetes, others are quite transparent and inspiring - acting as advocates for the condition and donating time and money toward finding a cure.
The following five female celebrities are not only known for their creative and professional talents, but also for the fact that they have all struggled with diabetes.
1. Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 33. Now 79, she is an avid spokesperson for the cause and continues to struggle with extremely poor eyesight due to the condition. Moore attends and supports many events for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).
2. Halle Berry
Following a scary episode where she was in a week-long coma, actress Halle Berry received a type 1 diabetes diagnosis when she was 22. While Berry has said the condition is inconvenient, many admire her "that's just life" attitude when it comes to living with diabetes.
3. Salma Hayek
Superstar actress and model Selma Hayek developed gestational diabetes while pregnant with her daughter.
"It occurs in women who have high blood sugar levels during pregnancy," Hayek told Parents.com. "I didn't know whether I was feeling bad because I was pregnant or whether something was seriously wrong. I was nauseated for nine months, which can be one of the symptoms."
4. Patti LaBelle
Refering to herself as the "divabetic," Grammy-award winning Patti LaBelle didn't know she had type 2 diabetes until she fainted during a performance in 1994. Since then, LaBelle has cut back on "fried chicken and pasta" and has re Continue reading

Gene That Makes People Behave Like Idiots When Drunk Could Also Protect Against Diabetes

Gene That Makes People Behave Like Idiots When Drunk Could Also Protect Against Diabetes

A genetic mutation that has been found to cause people to act outrageously when they’re drunk also appears to lower the risk of certain metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. Peculiarly, the mutation has so far only been found in Finnish people, and is thought to affect around 100,000 people in the Nordic country.
The mutation in question inhibits the production of serotonin 2B receptors. Since serotonin is a key regulator of mood and behavior, the absence of this receptor unsurprisingly leads to an inability to control one’s actions, and has been blamed for some of the violent, reckless, and downright stupid conduct of some people when drunk.
In a new study appearing in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, scientists from the University of Helsinki reveal how carriers of this mutation also have higher insulin sensitivity (IS) and lower insulin resistance (IR) than non-carriers. Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the transportation of glucose from the bloodstream into body cells. As such, when cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin, this process grinds to a halt, leading to a rise in blood sugar levels and potentially type 2 diabetes.
The researchers recruited 98 Finnish men, all of whom had been diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Of these, nine were found to carry the mutation – called HTR2B Q20* - while 89 did not. The study authors then measured the serum glucose and insulin levels of all participants in order to calculate IS and IR indices, discovering that the mutant group was much better off on both measures.
Carriers Continue reading

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