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Colorado Springs Family Adapts To Reality Of Type 1 Diabetes As, One After One, Children Are Diagnosed

Colorado Springs family adapts to reality of Type 1 diabetes as, one after one, children are diagnosed

Colorado Springs family adapts to reality of Type 1 diabetes as, one after one, children are diagnosed


Colorado Springs family adapts to reality of Type 1 diabetes as, one after one, children are diagnosed
March 19, 2017 Updated: March 21, 2017 at 11:40 pm
Siblings Melanie, McGuire, Emily and Ashley, all of whom have type 1 diabetes, goof off as parents Julie and Bubba Hayes watch at their home on Wednesday, February 1, 2017. Julie and Bubba Hayes have four out of five children with type 1 diabetes. Photo by Stacie Scott, The Gazette
It was a cold, wet California winter and Julie Hayes, her husband, Bubba, and their five kids all were laid low by a nasty stomach virus. When a week went by and 3-year-old Ashley hadn't rallied like her twin sister and the rest of the family, Hayes started to worry. The toddler was wetting the bed, which she hadn't done in at least a year, and though she ate nonstop, never seemed to get full. She'd sleep half the day and wake exhausted.
Hayes explained the examples of uncharacteristic behavior to the emergency room doctor, who peered into Ashley's eyes, had her stick out her tongue, and asked if diabetes ran in the family.
"I looked at him and said, 'I don't even know what diabetes is," Hayes said.
That, and life as she knew it, was about to change.
In one life-changing year, Colorado Springs native drops 100 pounds
Over the following eight years, three more of her children would be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, a scenario that - even among families with a history of the disease - defies medical odds and, in many ways, illustrates the mysteries at the heart of genetic dynamics.
"I can tell you that the great majority of families ha Continue reading

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Swapping for Fructose: Effects of a Sugar Replacement on Diabetes

Swapping for Fructose: Effects of a Sugar Replacement on Diabetes


Researchers determine the effects of replacing glucose or sucrose with fructose on glucose, insulin, and triglyceride concentrations.
When you think about eating healthier, what do you think about limiting in your diet? Sugar? Carbohydrates? Both?
Over the years, sugar has gained a bad reputation. The bad sugar that usually comes to mind is sucrose, commonly known as table sugar. However, there are two other types of sugars: glucose and fructose. Glucose and fructose are referred to as simple sugars because they are made up of single sugar molecules. Joined together, glucose and fructose form sucrose.
Our bodies break down sucrose into the simple sugars glucose and fructose.
Glucose, our bodys preferred energy source, is often referred to as blood sugar because it circulates in our blood. When we eat, our body breaks down sugar and carbohydrates into glucose for energy. Our bodies can either use glucose immediately, or store it muscle or liver cells in the form of glycogen for later use.
Fructose is a sugar naturally found in fruits and vegetables. It differs from the other sugars because our bodies process it differently. Fructose is not our bodys preferred energy source and unlike glucose, it does not cause insulin to be released.
Our bodies need the hormone insulin so that glucose can be taken up into our cells for energy.
Individuals with diabetes either dont make enough insulin, or their bodies do not respond properly to the insulin that is produced. In some cases, it is a combination of both. In type 1 diabetes, which usually begins in childhood, the body att Continue reading

Diabetes Dyslipidemia

Diabetes Dyslipidemia


Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Institute of Human Development, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
University Department of Medicine, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK
University Department of Medicine, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK
Find articles by Prasanna Rao-Balakrishna
Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Institute of Human Development, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar
University Department of Medicine, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Institute of Human Development, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
University Department of Medicine, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK
Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar
Jonathan D. Schofield, Email: [email protected] .
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Diabetes mellitus is associated with a considerably increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Intensive glycemic control has essentially failed to significantly improve cardiovascular outcomes in clinical trials. Dyslipidemia is common in diabetes and there is strong evidence that chole Continue reading

Camp PowerUp Takes Active, Mindful Approach to Diabetes Prevention

Camp PowerUp Takes Active, Mindful Approach to Diabetes Prevention


Camp PowerUp Takes Active, Mindful Approach to Diabetes Prevention
Campers at the American Diabetes Association's Camp PowerUp practice yoga as part of learning how to prevent Type 2 diabetes.
Sitting on the bleachers at the Westside Family YMCA , children slather on sunscreen and bug spray as they prepare to warm up before breaking into teams to play soccer.
Their excitement increases when camp counselors announce that the winning teams will receive their own soccer balls to take home. Counselors remind the campers to have fun and remember why theyre at camp.
Why are we all here? the counselor asks. The children respond in unison: Diabetes!
The boys and girls, ages 10-14, were all sizes and ethnicities, representative of San Antonios diverse population. What they all have in common: They are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Their participation in Camp PowerUp , a weeklong day camp sponsoredby the American Diabetes Association , was designed to short-circuit that risk by educating the children and their families about diabetes, nutrition, obesity prevention, and the importance of physical activity. During the week, the 50 campers played games, sampled healthy foods, and learned about good nutrition through interactive activities.
The Westside Family YMCA hosts the American Diabetes Associations Camp PowerUp.
Diabetesis the sixth-leading cause of death in Texas and the fourth-leading cause of death in Bexar County. Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable, yet it accounts for nearly 95% of all diabetes diagnoses in the United States.
The Westside of San A Continue reading

Early Glycemic Control and Magnitude of HbA1c Reduction Predict Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: Population-Based Cohort Study of 24,752 Metformin Initiators

Early Glycemic Control and Magnitude of HbA1c Reduction Predict Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: Population-Based Cohort Study of 24,752 Metformin Initiators

OBJECTIVE We investigated the association of early achieved HbA1c level and magnitude of HbA1c reduction with subsequent risk of cardiovascular events or death in patients with type 2 diabetes who initiate metformin.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a population-based cohort study including all metformin initiators with HbA1c tests in Northern Denmark, 2000–2012. Six months after metformin initiation, we classified patients by HbA1c achieved (<6.5% or higher) and by magnitude of HbA1c change from the pretreatment baseline. We used Cox regression to examine subsequent rates of acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or death, controlling for baseline HbA1c and other confounding factors.
RESULTS We included 24,752 metformin initiators (median age 62.5 years, 55% males) with a median follow-up of 2.6 years. The risk of a combined outcome event gradually increased with rising levels of HbA1c achieved compared with a target HbA1c of <6.5%: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.18 (95% CI 1.07–1.30) for 6.5–6.99%, HR 1.23 (1.09–1.40) for 7.0–7.49%, HR 1.34 (1.14–1.57) for 7.5–7.99%, and HR 1.59 (1.37–1.84) for ≥8%. Results were consistent for individual outcome events and robust by age-group and other patient characteristics. A large absolute HbA1c reduction from baseline also predicted outcome: adjusted HR 0.80 (0.65–0.97) for Δ = −4, HR 0.98 (0.80–1.20) for Δ = −3, HR 0.92 (0.78–1.08) for Δ = −2, and HR 0.99 (0.89–1.10) for Δ = −1 compared with no HbA1c change (Δ = 0).
CONCLUSIONS A large initial HbA1c reduction and achievement of low HbA1c levels Continue reading

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