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Coconut Oil Effective In Treating Diabetes

Coconut Oil Effective in Treating Diabetes

Coconut Oil Effective in Treating Diabetes

Indeed Virgin Coconut Oil has a substantial effect on blood sugar levels. My wife and daughter (both have type 2 diabetes) measure their blood sugar levels at least three times a day. When they eat the wrong foods and their blood sugar levels get to 80-100 points above normal, they don’t take extra medication, they take 2-3 tablespoons of the coconut oil directly from the bottle. Within a half hour their blood sugar levels will come back to normal. Ed, Coconut Diet Forums
Diabetes Epidemic
25.8 million children and adults in the United States, 8.3% of the population, have diabetes.1 The current rate of people becoming diabetic in the United states is doubling every 10 years. This has resulted in a windfall for pharmaceutical companies capitalizing on this “disease” with drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes, but not deal with the underlying cause. These drugs have serious side effects.
One of the most popular diabetes drugs, Avandia, was pulled off the market in 2011 after a number of studies showed that the drug increased the risk of heart attacks among type 2 diabetes patients. The manufacturer of the drug reached a $3 billion settlement in December 2011 over its fraudulent marketing of the drug, the largest federal criminal drug-company settlement to date.
Coconut Oil and Type 2 Diabetes
Information that is finally making its way into the mainstream media is that type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle and diet issue that can be reversed without drugs. This information has been known for years, however, among those in the alternative health crowd. Consider these testimoni Continue reading

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Learn How Coconut Oil Can Benefit Insulin Resistance and Diabetes

Learn How Coconut Oil Can Benefit Insulin Resistance and Diabetes

(NewsTarget) The link between diabetes and sugar is so strong that it may sound strange to hear a healthy fat like coconut oil can have a profound effect on the disease. This amazing oil may in fact be the most vital key in managing the way sugar impacts your body. For diabetics and others with health problems related to high blood sugar, adding coconut oil to their diet may just be the single most important step toward finally controlling their blood sugar levels.
Doctors typically recommend that diabetics follow a diet low in fat, low in refined sugar and high in other carbohydrates. This is supposed to help manage the condition, but even whole carbohydrates can adversely affect blood sugar levels when little protein and fat is present when they are eaten. It's important to eat balanced meals that contain all food types, and it's especially important to choose high quality fats like coconut oil.
Why is coconut oil so beneficial for conditions like diabetes and insulin resistance?
The healthy fat in coconut oil plays an essential role in regulating blood sugar: it slows the digestive process to ensure a steady, even stream of energy from your food by lowering the overall glycemic index of your meal. When you include coconut oil in a meal with carbohydrates, the carbs are broken down into glucose more slowly, so blood sugar levels remain steady even after you eat.
Coconut oil consists of medium-chain fatty acids, unlike modern vegetable oils like soybean, corn, and safflower oils which are made of long-chain fatty acids. Medium-chain fatty acids are more suited for energy u Continue reading

Pre-diabetes, diabetes rates fuel national health crisis

Pre-diabetes, diabetes rates fuel national health crisis

Americans are getting fatter, and older. These converging trends are putting the USA on the path to an alarming health crisis: Nearly half of adults have either pre-diabetes or diabetes, raising their risk of heart attacks, blindness, amputations and cancer.
Federal health statistics show that 12.3% of Americans 20 and older have diabetes, either diagnosed or undiagnosed. Another 37% have pre-diabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. That's up from 27% a decade ago. An analysis of 16 studies involving almost 900,000 people worldwide, published in the current issue of the journal Diabetologia, shows pre-diabetes not only sets the stage for diabetes but also increases the risk of cancer by 15%.
"It's bad everywhere," says Philip Kern, director of the Barnstable Brown Diabetes and Obesity Center at the University of Kentucky. "You almost have the perfect storm of an aging population and a population growing more obese, plus fewer reasons to move and be active, and fast food becoming more prevalent."
Tabitha Jordan of Louisville says she was eating poorly, struggling to find time for exercise and packing on pounds when her doctor diagnosed pre-diabetes in October. She recognized the danger; she'd seen her mother go blind, lose toes and eventually die from diabetes complications at age 63.
"It was kind of like, 'It's time for me to do something,' " says Jordan, 47. "I knew things had to change."
Doctors and experts coined the name pre-diabetes in the late 1990s, replacing less worrisome terms such as "borderline diabetes" that didn't convey the seriousness Continue reading

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes in Blood Sugar

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes in Blood Sugar

It’s not often that the words “cool” and “diabetes” get used in the same sentence, but researchers at MIT and Harvard have joined the two concepts with an idea for creating tattoos that change color based on the blood sugar level of the person wearing them.
The project has the oddly dystopian name of the Dermal Abyss (or, as they call it d-abyss) and is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab and Harvard Medical School, according to Katia Vega, a post doctoral associate at MIT and a member of the team.
“The Dermal Abyss is a proof-of-concept that illustrates the potential of culturally and medically integrated biosensors,” Vega says. “They are biosensor tattoos that visibly react to changes in the metabolism. The purpose of the work is to light the imagination of biotechnologists and stimulate public support for such efforts.”
The tattoos they designed will not be showing up in a pharmacy or tattoo shop any time soon. “The purpose of the work is to highlight a novel possibility for biosensors rather than bring a medical device to market,” Vega says. “As such, there are currently no plans to develop the Dermal Abyss as a product or to pursue clinical trials.”
Like a hot concept car, there is real technology in the tattoos that were produced for the project. Various iterations of the tattoos sense changes not only in glucose but in pH, which can indicate dehydration and changes in sodium ion, which can give indications of hypertension.
For glucose, the colors change from a light blue at a reading of five, and go th Continue reading

Diabetes medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding

Diabetes medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding

In the past, women with diabetes were at high risk for complications during pregnancy. Today, with advancements in treatment and good blood glucose control, women with diabetes can have a safe pregnancy and delivery similar to that of a woman without diabetes.
(Please note: this article focuses on pre-existing diabetes, which refers to women who have diabetes before becoming pregnant. This is different than gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy.)
Planning your pregnancy
For women who have diabetes, obtaining preconception (‘before pregnancy’) care is associated with better birth outcomes. By discussing pregnancy with your healthcare team prior to conception, they can help you reach your blood glucose targets, start folic acid supplementation and discontinue potentially harmful medications to lay the groundwork for a healthy pregnancy.
Blood glucose targets
It is important that woman who are planning a pregnancy get their preconception A1C levels to less than 7%, or as close to normal as can be achieved safely. This will decrease the risk of spontaneous abortion, birth defects and pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (this is known as ‘preeclampsia’). Good blood glucose control in pregnancy is important, because high blood glucose levels can cause the baby’s size and weight to be larger than average and increase the risk of complications during and after delivery.
Women should speak to their healthcare team, as blood glucose targets change in pregnancy; hence, more frequent blood glucose monitoring is recommended to ensure these goals are being met. Continue reading

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