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'Clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

'Clear promise': Diabetes drug reversed memory loss in mice with Alzheimer's, researchers find

'Clear promise': Diabetes drug reversed memory loss in mice with Alzheimer's, researchers find

A team of Chinese and British researchers has discovered that a drug originally created to treat diabetes shows “clear promise” as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, since it significantly reversed memory loss in mice.
News of the potential breakthrough was published this week in Brain Research.
“[The drug shows a] clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," the scientists’ report reads.
“The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease,” they said, adding that amyloid plaque load, inflammation and oxidative stress were all visibly reduced.
The new diabetes drug is a triple receptor that combines GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, three biological molecules known as “growth factors.”
According to Newsweek, researchers tested the receptor in mice specifically created to express certain genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans and waited for them to age for a couple of months and sustain some brain damage.
Once given the drug, the mice were put through a maze test and results showed a clear improvement in their learning and memory formation.
"These very promising outcomes demonstrate the efficacy of these novel multiple receptor drugs that originally were developed to treat type 2 diabetes but have shown consistent neuro-protective effects in several studies," said lead researcher Christian Holscher said, in a press release from Lancaster University.
The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease
- Chinese and British r Continue reading

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Diabetes drug found to reverse symptoms of memory loss in Alzheimer's mice

Diabetes drug found to reverse symptoms of memory loss in Alzheimer's mice

The fascinating connection between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease has been studied for several years, with some scientists going so far as to suggest the two conditions are different stages of the same disease. A team of researchers has now discovered that a drug initially developed to treat type 2 diabetes has "significantly reversed memory loss" in early animal trials.
The new research led by Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University looked at the neuro-protective effects of a novel diabetes drug called a triple receptor agonist. This drug was initially designed to treat type 2 diabetes by activating GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon growth factor receptors in the brain.
The less time you spend thinking about your cargo, the more time you can spend running your busin...
The study used transgenic mice engineered to express the same mutated genes that cause Alzheimer's in humans. After exposure to the triple receptor agonist the mice displayed significant improvements in a maze-based memory test and reductions in chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and amyloid plaques in the brain.
Past research has already confirmed that single agonist drugs developed for diabetes display neuroprotective effects in animal models, but this is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been studied for these effects. Professor Holscher sees clear promise in these results, and while more research needs to be done, this does point to a potential new treatment for those suffering from Alzheimer's disease.
"Here we show that a novel triple receptor drug shows promise as a potential tre Continue reading

Alzheimer's treatment: Diabetes drug holds promise for fighting disease after 'significantly reversing' memory loss

Alzheimer's treatment: Diabetes drug holds promise for fighting disease after 'significantly reversing' memory loss

A drug developed for type 2 diabetes significantly reverses memory loss and could have potential as a new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, scientists say.
The study, by UK and Chinese universities, is the first to look at a new combined diabetes drug and found improvements in several characteristic symptoms of Alzheimer’s.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher, from Lancaster University, said these “very promising outcomes” show multi-action drugs developed for type 2 diabetes “consistently show neurological protective effects”.
Independent academics said a reduction in nerve-cell-killing protein molecules was particularly interesting and this was likely to be another avenue in the search for an elusive drug to combat dementia.
He has previously reported optimistic findings from an older diabetes drug, liraglutide, and clinical trials in humans are currently under way.
This latest study, published in the journal Brain Research, looked at a “triple action” treatment that combine three different drugs for type 2 diabetes, acting on biological pathways that could also have an impact on dementia.
Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for Alzhemier’s disease and impaired production of insulin – the hormone that people with diabetes don’t produce sufficiently to control their blood sugar – is linked to brain degeneration.
The identification of this link had a twofold benefit, according to charities.
It opened up new research and drug development opportunities, such as this study.
But it also means that by maki Continue reading

Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Summary: Lancaster University researchers report a drug developed to treat diabetes shows promise in reversing memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s in mouse models of the disease. The drug appears to have a neuroprotective effect, enhancing brain growth factors while reducing amyloid plaques, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The drug also slows down the rate of neuron loss.
Source: Lancaster University.
A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s after scientists found it “significantly reversed memory loss” in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.”
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer’s Society, who part- funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “”With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s. It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research co Continue reading

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's

A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease."
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them."
Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer's, so further development of this work is crucial."
This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain Continue reading

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