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Cinnamon Diabetes Benefits: How It Can Affect Blood Sugar Level?

Cinnamon Diabetes Benefits: How It Can Affect Blood Sugar Level?

Cinnamon Diabetes Benefits: How It Can Affect Blood Sugar Level?

Diabetes is a fast spreading disease and has become a sort of an epidemic across the world. It is very important to understand the meaning and causes of the same.
Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production of insulin by the pancreas or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body that affects the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body.
Hence, in the treatment of diabetes, it is extremely important that there is a regulated control on the blood glucose or sugar level. What makes diabetes worse is the fact that when a person is suffering from this condition, he or she is prone to developing other complications as well, which include heart and kidney-related diseases, diabetic eye, amputations, nerve damage, skin problems, etc.
Experts are always looking for something natural which can treat this extremely complicated disease. One such treatment of diabetes is the use of the readily available spice, cinnamon. The spice is highly beneficial in effectively dealing with diabetes and the other related complications.
Cinnamon and Diabetes
Cinnamon, the spice that has long been used in our kitchen, has been associated with the treatment of diabetes, particularly that of diabetes mellitus. As per a few research, the spice is known to improve the blood sugar levels as well as improve insulin sensitivity.
It is a spice derived from the barks of the cinnamon tree, and it found in areas covering South America, the Caribbean, and also Southeast Asia.
In the following paragraphs, we get into the details and find out more about cinn Continue reading

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‘Hidden History’: Legacy of Diabetes Care at City of Hope

‘Hidden History’: Legacy of Diabetes Care at City of Hope

City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family.
But it's natural to wonder: Why would a cancer center be the recipient of such a transformative gift? Believe it or not, City of Hope — widely known as a center for cancer care and research — is the home of one of the most influential diabetes research programs in the world.
“There is a hidden history of diabetes at City of Hope that needs to be told,” said Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the departments of Translational Research and Cellular Therapeutics, and Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, director of the Islet Cell Transplant Program and associate director of the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope. “We’re a powerhouse that is not as well-known as we should be.”
According to Arthur Riggs, Ph.D., the Samuel Rahbar Chair in Diabetes & Drug Discovery, director of the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope and director emeritus of Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, the organization has been a major player in diabetes research since it first established a Division of Diabetes in the early 1970s.
He should know — back in 1978, Riggs, along with Keiichi Itakura, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, conducted research that led to the development of synthetic human insulin.
“We’ve made tremendous advances in the field of diabetes research, starting with the work of Rach Continue reading

A vegan diet could prevent, treat and even reverse type 2 diabetes, say leading experts this Diabetes Week (12-18 June).

A vegan diet could prevent, treat and even reverse type 2 diabetes, say leading experts this Diabetes Week (12-18 June).

Diet and lifestyle have long been regarded as the main causes of type 2 diabetes. Now research suggests that vegans reduce their risk of diabetes by 78% compared with people who eat meat on a daily basis.
“Type 2 diabetes is almost always preventable, often treatable, and sometimes reversible through diet and lifestyle changes,” wrote Dr Michael Greger, internationally-renowned physician, in his best-selling book How Not To Die.
“People who eat a plant-based diet have just a small fraction of the rates of diabetes seen in those who regularly eat meat. By switching to a healthy diet, you can start improving your health within a matter of hours.”
This is partly because vegans are better able to control their weight. Carrying excess body fat is the number one risk factor of type 2 diabetes, with around 90% of those who develop the disease being overweight. Vegans, however, have lower levels of obesity on average than any other dietary group.
It is also because, Dr Greger explains, the saturated fats found in animal products contribute to insulin resistance – the cause of type 2 diabetes – whereas monosaturated fats found in nuts and avocados may actually protect against the detrimental effects of saturated fats.
As a result, people eating plant-based diets appear to have better insulin sensitivity, better blood sugar levels and better levels of insulin, which enables blood sugar to enter your cells.
Type 2 diabetes is spreading fast. Over 21 million people have been diagnosed with the disease in the United States, a number that has roughly tripled since 1990, with Continue reading

Diabetes and Endurance Sports

Diabetes and Endurance Sports

Regular, moderate exercise can help prevent Type 2 diabetes and reduce or slow complications from Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. But what about more intense physical activity such as endurance sports including marathons and triathlons? With healthy training and nutrition management to meet individualized goals, people with diabetes can achieve improved blood glucose control and fewer hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes while participating in endurance sports.
Before You Begin
When it comes to sports, diabetes management always is the first priority. First, talk to your diabetes doctor about an insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor and pre-training medical testing. Determine your safe blood glucose range for training and competing. Once you've gotten the go-ahead from your doctor, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in sports and diabetes care.
When You Start
Avoiding hypoglycemia is important before, during and after endurance training. If blood sugar is 70 to 100 mg/dl before exercise, then a snack that includes 15 grams of carbohydrate is recommended. For exercise that lasts longer than 60 minutes, additional carbohydrate may be needed to keep blood sugar within a safe range. When starting an endurance sport, follow these five tips:
Check your blood sugar frequently, and stay in the blood glucose range that you and your physician decide upon.
Always carry a quickly absorbable form of glucose — glucose tablets, sports drinks, gels or energy bars — when training.
Train with a partner until you are skilled at avoiding hypoglycemia.
Wear a medical Continue reading

Diabetes Drug Might Also Help Treat Heart Disease

Diabetes Drug Might Also Help Treat Heart Disease

Researchers say the drug trodusquemine has the potential to reduce arterial fat and perhaps reverse atherosclerosis.
Can an experimental diabetes drug change how we treat heart disease?
In a new study, researchers tout the drug trodusquemine’s ability to “melt away” arterial fat in preclinical trials involving mice.
The research, conducted at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, is the first of its kind to demonstrate the drug’s ability to reverse atherosclerosis — in some cases with as little as one dose.
“We could show that using the drug chronically, once a week for five weeks or just once toward the end of the study, both resulted in significantly lower atherosclerotic plaque area. It also lowered serum lipids (triglycerides and cholesterol),” Mirela Delibegovic, a study author and a professor in diabetic medicine at the University of Aberdeen, told Healthline.
Mice in the study were treated with either saline (for the control group), a single trodusquemine dose, or multiple doses.
For mice receiving single or multiple doses, there was a decrease in the measured plaque formation while the control group remained unchanged.
The study at Aberdeen is exciting because, in Delibegovic's words, “[The drug] seemed to completely reverse the effects of” atherosclerosis.
Tackling a major killer
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
An estimated 610,000 people die per year from heart disease in the United States, accounting for roughly 25 percen Continue reading

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