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Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Health-food fans have been talking up chia seeds for years. Now some studies show benefit for these seeds in diabetes. Possibly, chia seeds could help you.
Chia is an herb in the Lamiaceae plant family, related to mint and sage. It grows in Mexico and Central America. It is the same plant that became a fad a few years ago as a “Chia Pet.” When you water a Chia Pet, it grows a “fur” and becomes kind of cute. But we’re talking here about eating the seeds and their health benefits. Why is chia getting so much media buzz now?
Writing on Diabetic Connect, Jewels Doskicz, RN, explained: “Chia seeds are a total protein” (which not many plants are). “They are high in fiber, rich in healthy omega-3s (actually higher than salmon), and are also high in calcium and antioxidants.”
A report in Harvard Health Blog highlights studies of animals in which a high-chia diet led to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and higher HDL, the good cholesterol. Eating a lot of chia also lowered triglycerides (blood fat levels). In a study of 20 humans with diabetes, one variety of seed called Salba helped participants control blood glucose, reduce blood pressure, and lower C-reactive protein, a major marker of heart disease risk. The study was published in the journal Diabetes Care.
The omega-3 oils and antioxidants in chia are healthy, but the fiber content may be a bigger benefit. Chia seeds seem to slow glucose passage into the blood. They fill you up and so reduce appetite. The oils are a good energy source — Aztecs used to carry bags of them to keep going on long walks at hig Continue reading

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Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds For Type 2 Diabetes

Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds For Type 2 Diabetes

Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are a hallmark of trail mix and of many ‘healthy cereals.’ But a lot of people don’t know just how tasty they can be on their own.
These charming, flat little seeds are native to the Americas. They were a very important food to many Native American tribes – and for so many good reasons!
With a satisfying crunch and a whole lot of healthy fats and protein to keep you full, they’re a fantastic addition to any diabetic diet and can actually be an integral part of a clean eating plan to help with weight loss.
The list of pumpkin seeds’ mind-blowing benefits is long, but we’ll touch on the major benefits of pumpkin seeds for diabetes below.
What are Pumpkin Seeds?
As their name suggests, pumpkin seeds are scooped out from the insides of pumpkins.
You can do this on your own at home by simply scooping out the seeds, washing them thoroughly, then drying them on some paper towel. It’s a rather time-consuming process, but the delicious outcome is totally worth it.
Or of course, you can buy the pumpkin seeds at the store, either flavored or unflavored (recommended).
And for a small seed, they certainly pack a punch of benefits…
Pumpkin Seeds Nutrition Facts
Pumpkin seeds are moderate in calories – one quarter of a cup contains 160 calories. But they’re very nutrient-dense, meaning that you don’t have to eat much to get a ton of benefits and stay satiated (full and satisfied) for hours.
That same quarter cup also contains 9 grams of protein, 14 grams of healthy fat, and 3 grams of fiber. Best of all, they are a low carb foo Continue reading

Summer pregnancy may raise gestational diabetes risk

Summer pregnancy may raise gestational diabetes risk

Researchers have identified a new possible risk factor for gestational diabetes: Being exposed to hot outdoor temperatures in the month before giving birth.
According to a new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), in one geographic region in Canada, the rate of gestational diabetes varied more than 3 percentage points between the coldest times of year and the hottest.
Gestational diabetes, a condition that develops during pregnancy, is usually a temporary condition. But women who develop it are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes and other health conditions later on. (One recent study linked gestational diabetes to postpartum depression, for example.)
Gestational diabetes can also raise babies' risks of excessive birth weight, preterm birth, and type 2 diabetes later in life.
Previous studies have suggested that exposure to cold temperatures can improve insulin sensitivity and activate the body's brown fat tissue, which -- unlike other types of fat -- burns calories and seem to protect against metabolic conditions like obesity and diabetes.
For this reason, it's been suggested that cold temperatures might protect against these conditions.
To study this potential connection in pregnant women, researchers looked at medical records of nearly 400,000 women living in the same urban area in Canada, in a region with wide temperature fluctuations throughout the year. Over a 12-year period, those women gave birth to more than 555,000 children.
When the researchers looked at average temperatures in the 30 days before these women gave birth, they found tha Continue reading

CBT may help reduce anxiety and depression in people with diabetes, but standardised approach needed

CBT may help reduce anxiety and depression in people with diabetes, but standardised approach needed

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a widely-recognised tool in the arsenal of psychiatrists and psychologists, and appears centre-stage as a treatment option for many mental disorders including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, eating disorders, and schizophrenia (Butler, Chapman et al. 2006).
CBT prioritises personal coping strategies for life difficulties and aims to change unhelpful patterns of cognition (thoughts, beliefs and attitudes), the behaviours associated with them, and can help strengthen emotional regulation (Beck 2016).
Whilst its utility in mental disorders has been repeatedly demonstrated, there is a growing field of research examining its ability to help manage chronic physical illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, Crohn’s disease, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis (White 2001, Taylor 2006, Halford 2009).
The use of CBT, a strictly psychological technique and involving no pill-popping, for a chronic physical illness may not at first seem intuitive. However, diabetes doubles the odds of comorbid depression and 12-27% of people with diabetes experience depression at a rate two to three times that of the general population (Anderson, Freedland et al. 2001). Anxiety also occurs in around 14% of people with diabetes, and 40% show elevated levels of sub-syndromal anxiety (Smith, Beland et al. 2013).
One might suggest that a major factor linking all mental disorders is mental distress, which can similarly significantly impair those suffering chronic physical illnesses. Ameliorating mental distress may well be Continue reading

How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Naturally, The Dangers of Insulin Therapy, and Other Facts

How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Naturally, The Dangers of Insulin Therapy, and Other Facts

Great Britain, like the United States, has seen a remarkably rapid rise in pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes over the last decade. According to a recent BBC News1 report, more than one-third of British adults are now pre-diabetic.
In 2003, 11.6 percent of Britons had pre-diabetes. By 2011, that figure had more than tripled, reaching 35.3 percent. Researchers warn that this will lead to a massive avalanche of type 2 diabetics in upcoming years, which will have serious consequences for health care and life expectancy.
In the United States, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. What’s worse, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and teens has also skyrocketed.
The most recent data, reveals that, between 2001 and 2009, incidence of type 1 diabetes among children under the age of 19 rose by 21 percent. Incidence of type 2 diabetes among children aged 10-19 rose by 30 percent during that same timeframe!
Conventional Medicine Has It All Wrong
Statistics such as these point to two very important facts. First, it tells us that diabetes cannot be primarily caused by genetics, and secondly, it literally screams that something we’re doing, consistently and en masse, is horribly wrong, and we need to address it.
In this case, that “something” is a seriously flawed diet and lack of physical activity. Unfortunately, Dr. Ron Rosedale wrote in 2005, doctors cause diabetics to D.I.E from their flawed prescriptions, which stem from a basic lack of insight into the root cause of this disease. D.I.E., here, is a clever acronym for Continue reading

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