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Case Examples Of Tight Regulation Of Diabetes

Case Examples of Tight Regulation of Diabetes

Case Examples of Tight Regulation of Diabetes

Real life examples show the crucial role diet plays in treating feline diabetes, and the devastating effect dry food carbohydrates can have on cats.
"Maggie" Dunbar
"Maggie" is a 10-year-old female white long-haired cat. Like almost all of my patients, she had eaten dry food since she was a kitten. Occasionally her owners would feed her some canned food as a special treat, but during the day she ate many small meals of a "premium quality" dry cat food. She had been healthy for 10 years and was not overweight at 8 pounds. One day, Maggie's owners noticed that she seemed to be losing weight. Her backbone seemed more noticeable to them, even through her long coat. She wasn't eating very well and was drinking a lot of water. When I saw Maggie, she was dehydrated and weighed only 7 pounds. A blood test showed that her blood sugar level was 410 mg/dl (this is a measure of how much sugar is in each one-tenth liter of blood; a liter is about a quart). Normal resting blood sugar levels for the cat range between about 50 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl. Maggie also had sugar in her urine.
We hospitalized Maggie and started feeding her canned food only. Maggie was ecstatic; she was getting her special treat food twice a day and she loved it. By the second day Maggie's average blood sugar was 180 mg/dl and by the third day it was 100 mg/dl. We sent Maggie home with no insulin and told the Dunbars to feed only canned food to her. A week later, Maggie had been completely normal at home and her blood sugar level was 90 mg/dl on average. With her owners only feeding her canned food twice a day, Maggie Continue reading

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If You Have Diabetes, Can Omega-3s Protect Your Eyes?

If You Have Diabetes, Can Omega-3s Protect Your Eyes?

If you have diabetes, you may know that it increases your risk of diabetic retinopathy, one of the leading causes of blindness in American adults. It affects more than 5 percent of the U.S. population, but research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids in your diet could help protect your eyes.
More common among Hispanics and those over age 65, diabetic retinopathy occurs when blood vessels in the eyes swell and leak, or when abnormal cells grow on the retina and eventually block your vision.
As more people develop type 2 diabetes — and generally live longer — researchers are looking for a way to stave off retinopathy.
One good way is to keep blood sugar levels under control. And research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids, from food sources like fish and nuts and from supplements, are a powerful protector against this eye condition.
What research tells us about omega-3s
Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and slow hardening of the arteries. In higher-risk populations, such as individuals with type 2 diabetes, the data is less conclusive.
But some research shows that the nutrient may work to decrease the chances that you will get diabetic retinopathy. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association examined more than 2,500 middle-aged and elderly people with type 2 diabetes. It found that those who consumed omega-3s regularly had a 48 percent lower risk of diabetic retinopathy than those who didn’t (after a six-year follow-up).
Scientists believe that omega-3s may help stave off retinopathy because the Continue reading

ACE Inhibitors and Statins in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

ACE Inhibitors and Statins in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

Among adolescents with type 1 diabetes, rapid increases in albumin excretion during puberty precede the development of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, long-term risk factors for renal and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that adolescents with high levels of albumin excretion might benefit from angiotensin-converting–enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins, drugs that have not been fully evaluated in adolescents.
We screened 4407 adolescents with type 1 diabetes between the ages of 10 and 16 years of age and identified 1287 with values in the upper third of the albumin-to-creatinine ratios; 443 were randomly assigned in a placebo-controlled trial of an ACE inhibitor and a statin with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design minimizing differences in baseline characteristics such as age, sex, and duration of diabetes. The primary outcome for both interventions was the change in albumin excretion, assessed according to the albumin-to-creatinine ratio calculated from three early-morning urine samples obtained every 6 months over 2 to 4 years, and expressed as the area under the curve. Key secondary outcomes included the development of microalbuminuria, progression of retinopathy, changes in the glomerular filtration rate, lipid levels, and measures of cardiovascular risk (carotid intima–media thickness and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and asymmetric dimethylarginine).
The primary outcome was not affected by ACE inhibitor therapy, statin therapy, or the combination of the two. The use of an ACE inhibitor was associated with a lower incidence of microal Continue reading

14 Home Remedies for Diabetes

14 Home Remedies for Diabetes

Did you know that if you leave your diabetes untreated it can lead to various other diseases like kidney disease, blood vessel damage, infections, heart disease, nerve damage, high blood pressure, blindness an even stroke, limb amputation, and coma! But the good news is that you can manage diabetes easily once you get in the habit of it. It is only when you know that you are suffering from diabetes. A good number of people don’t even realize that they suffer from this disease! They don’t pay attention to the initial symptoms of diabetes that are generally very mild in nature and include fatigue, weakness and urge to urinate frequently. If you too have experienced these symptoms of late, you should immediately visit your doctor and get the tests done to confirm or rule out the probability of having diabetes.
Home Remedies for Diabetes
If you are lucky enough, you will not be diagnosed as a diabetic. However, if your test reports say that you are a diabetic, you will also come to know about whether you have Type I diabetes or Type II diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, the hormone that helps your body cells in utilizing blood sugar. On the other hand, in Type 2 Diabetes, your body cells do not respond properly to the insulin or your pancreas does not produce enough insulin. There is a wide belief that only Type 2 diabetes can be cured through home remedies for diabetes but many researches have established that many plant compounds found in some common foods can stimulate cells in the pancreas and cure even Type I diabetes. However, if you take Continue reading

Millions of Americans Are at Risk for Diabetes. Here’s How to Get Screened

Millions of Americans Are at Risk for Diabetes. Here’s How to Get Screened

November is National Diabetes Month.
In the U.S., approximately 29.1 million people are living with diabetes (either type 1 or type 2). Medical expenditures for those people are as much as 2.3 times higher than for a person living without diabetes.
Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational
Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, is most often diagnosed in children, teens and young adults.
Type 2 diabetes is more common. It makes up about 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, yet it’s estimated that in 2015, as many as 7.2 million adults were undiagnosed. That same year, 84.1 million Americans aged 18 and older had prediabetes, which is a precursor to type 2 diabetes.
Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy but often goes away soon after delivery. However, if you’ve ever been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you and your baby are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.
Fortunately, there are simple and fairly inexpensive (and sometimes even free!) tests that can let you know if you have diabetes or if you’re at risk of developing it later in life.
Who Should Get Screened for Diabetes
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that adults aged 40 to 70 be screened for abnormal blood glucose and diabetes. However, if you or a family member are experiencing what may be symptoms of type 2 diabetes, you should talk to a medical professional about your concerns, regardless of age.
(Type 1 diabetes is unlike type 2 in that type 1 is too often diagnosed only when it reaches a critical point, meaning most symptoms may Continue reading

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