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Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is It Good Or Bad For Diabetic Patient

Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is it Good or Bad for Diabetic Patient

Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is it Good or Bad for Diabetic Patient

Coffee has been known as a harmful drink which has been responsible for causing a number of health issues. Doctors have always advised avoiding the drink. However, recent studies have only proved that drinking a moderate amount of coffee may not be too bad for health. It, in fact, gives a number of health benefits. In the article that follows, we will find out, although surprisingly, that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of contracting type 2 diabetes in the long run.
What is Diabetes and What Are Its Types?
To understand the effects of coffee on the blood sugar level and diabetes, it is first necessary to understand the very meaning of the disease and how is it caused:
Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body. There are the following main types of diabetes:
Type 1 Diabetes
It is the condition where the Pancreas are unable to produce enough insulin in the body.
Type 2 Diabetes
It is the condition which occurs when the body is not able to process the level of sugar or glucose present in the blood properly
When we talk about the effect of drinking coffee on the level of blood sugar in the body and consequently its effect on diabetes, we are essentially speaking of type 2 diabetes. The reason being, the effects of caffeine, the main ingredient in the coffee, has been seen more on this type than any other type.
Effect of Coffee on blood sugar level if you are not Diabetic
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How diet shakes and dropping sodas reversed diabetes

How diet shakes and dropping sodas reversed diabetes

Eric Smith comes from the part of Ohio where fizzy soft drinks are called “pop.” He also called them his beverage of choice — for lunch, dinner and snacks.
So when he was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in November 2016, Smith knew he was going to have to cut down. In fact, he cut out all sugary soft drinks and switched to water.
He stopped eating fast food, white bread and other junk and, in the space of a few months, he turned around his diabetes and has normal blood sugar now.
On Tuesday, a large study confirmed what Smith and other people like him have found — a strict weight-loss diet can reverse the progression of Type 2 diabetes and bring many people back to normal.
“I was drinking maybe six cans of pop a day if you averaged it out,” said Smith, a 40-year-old bookkeeper.
“Every meal I would have one, maybe two with lunch, two with dinner. If it wasn’t pop it was a sugary drink somewhere.”
And Smith was, like so many Americans, obese. “I was up to 390,” he said.
He joined the Cleveland Clinic's Lifestyle Essentials program, which includes a series of six appointments to help people learn how to improve their habits. By changing his diet and adding in just a little exercise, he’s dropped weight and controlled his blood sugar.
“I am down to 345, 350 right now,” Smith said, and his blood sugar is in the normal, healthy range.
It’s more evidence that weight loss alone can control diabetes, which kills more than 70,000 Americans every year.
Other studies have shown that weight-loss surgery can help reverse diabetes. But that’s an extreme opti Continue reading

Diabetes and obesity linked to number of nearby fast-food outlets, study finds

Diabetes and obesity linked to number of nearby fast-food outlets, study finds

Diabetes and obesity rates in inner cities can be linked to the number of fast-food outlets near people’s homes, a study has found.
Scientists based their conclusion on a study of 10,000 people in the UK. They found there were twice as many fast-food outlets within 500 metres of homes in non-white and socially deprived neighbourhoods.
The lead researcher, Prof Kamlesh Khunti from the University of Leicester, said: “The results are quite alarming and have major implications for public health interventions to limit the number of fast-food outlets in more deprived areas.”
Writing in the journal Public Health Nutrition, the researchers said that every additional two outlets per neighbourhood led to the expectation of one additional case of diabetes. This was assuming a causal relationship between the two.
Khunti said: “In a multi-ethnic region of the UK, individuals had on average two fast-food outlets within 500 metres of their home.
“This number differed substantially by key demographics, including ethnicity; people of non-white ethnicity had more than twice the number of fast-food outlets in their neighbourhood compared with white Europeans. We found that the number of fast-food outlets in a person’s neighbourhood was associated with an increased risk of screen-detected type 2 diabetes and obesity.
“We found a much higher number of fast-food outlets in more deprived areas where a higher number of black and minority ethnic populations resided. This in turn was associated with higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes.”
Co-author Dr Patrice Carter, also from th Continue reading

Type 1 diabetes: Could modified blood stem cells lead to a cure?

Type 1 diabetes: Could modified blood stem cells lead to a cure?

Increasing levels of a certain protein in blood stem cells so that the immune system stops attacking insulin cells in the pancreas could be a way to halt type 1 diabetes, according to a new study reported in Science Translational Medicine.
Researchers led by those at Harvard Medical School's Boston Children's Hospital in Massachusetts found that they could reverse hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by modifying their defective blood stem cells to increase production of a protein called PD-L1.
In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin. Without sufficient insulin, the body cannot convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy for cells, with the result that it builds up in the bloodstream.
Over time, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, leads to serious complications such as vision problems and damage to blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys.
Immune system attacks beta cells
Around 5 percent of the 23.1 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States have type 1 diabetes.
The body produces insulin in the pancreas, which is an organ that sits just behind the stomach. It contains insulin-producing beta cells that normally sense glucose levels in the blood and release just the right amount of insulin to keep sugar levels normal.
In type 1 diabetes, a fault in the immune system makes inflammatory T cells — which usually react to "foreign" material — attack beta cells in the pancreas. Nobody knows exactly how this comes about, but scientists suspect that a virus, or some other trigger in the environment, sets it off in people with certain inherited gen Continue reading

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Here’s what you need to know about the life-threatening diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis.
Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Symptoms can take you by surprise, coming on in just 24 hours or less. Without diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, you will fall into a coma and die.
“Every minute that the person is not treated is [another] minute closer to death,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.
Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. (Diabetic ketoacidosis most often affects people with type 1 diabetes, but there is also type 2 diabetes ketoacidosis.) Without insulin, sugar can’t be stored in your cells to be used as energy and builds up in your blood instead. Your body has to go to a back-up energy system: fat. In the process of breaking down fat for energy, your body releases fatty acids and acids called ketones.
Ketones are an alternative form of energy for the body, and just having them in your blood isn’t necessarily harmful. That’s called ketosis, and it can happen when you go on a low-carb diet or even after fasting overnight.
“When I put people on a restricted diet, I can get an estimate of how vigorously they’re pursuing it by the presence of ketones in the urine,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.
RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It?
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