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Can Ampalaya Or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?

Can Ampalaya or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?

Can Ampalaya or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?


Can Ampalaya or Bitter Melon Treat Diabetes? Or Prevent Cancer?
October 7, 2017 Natural Healing Comments: 1
So many diabetics are hopeful that ampalaya can cure diabetes but to put the record straight, ampalaya cannot cure diabetes, it can only control the disease.
The scientific name of ampalaya is Momordica charantia. It is known as bitter gourd or bitter melon but in the Philippines, it is called ampalaya.
Ampalaya is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family where the squashes, gourds, and melons also belong. That is why it is called bitter melon or bitter gourd. It is considered one of the most bitter fruits which also have culinary benefits.
Ampalaya has that bitter taste due to the presence of momordicin, a substance that is sometimes referred to as plant insulin which gives ampalaya its blood-sugar-lowering properties.
A number of scientific studies on the effect of ampalaya on blood sugar levels have been done.
One of these studies is a 10-year trial undertaken by the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD). The study compared ampalaya leaves with the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide.
The study results showed that 100 milligrams per kilo dose per day of ampalaya could be equal to 2.8 milligrams of the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide.
This means that the action of ampalaya on blood sugar could be the same to the action of gibenclamide.
Because of this study, the Philippine Department of Health (DoH) has raised the status of ampalaya from a nutritional supplement to a real medicine.
The clinical studies on the sugar lowering effect of Continue reading

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High rates of scanning with Abbott′s FreeStyle Libre system linked to improved glucose control in diabetes patients

High rates of scanning with Abbott′s FreeStyle Libre system linked to improved glucose control in diabetes patients

Abbott today announced the results of real-world use data showing that people who scan more frequently using Abbott′s FreeStyle® Libre system spend less time in hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) while having improved average glucose levels. According to the data, more than 50,000 people with diabetes using the FreeStyle Libre system checked their glucose levels an average of 16 times per day—which is three times more than the minimum recommended U.S. and European guidelines for testing with the traditional fingerstick technique. The data show that higher rates of scanning with the FreeStyle Libre system were found to be strongly associated with improved glucose control.
"There is now substantial evidence from both real-world usage and clinical studies that reaffirms the powerful impact of the FreeStyle Libre system," said Jared Watkin, senior vice president, Diabetes Care, Abbott. "The FreeStyle Libre system is changing how diabetes has been managed for decades, with one simple swipe. Most importantly, we’re doing that by empowering patients with the information that they need to take action themselves, helping people living with diabetes live fuller, healthier lives."
Abbott′s FreeStyle Libre system consists of a small, round sensor worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days, which measures glucose every minute in interstitial fluid through a small filament that is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad.
The FreeStyle Libre reader is scanned over the sensor to get a glucose result in les Continue reading

Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns

Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns


Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns
Authors say that continuous glucose monitoring should be offered to all pregnant women with type 1 diabetes to reduce risk of complications for newborn babies
For women with type 1 diabetes, monitoring blood sugar levels continuously during pregnancy via an implanted device helps better manage the disease, and improves birth outcomes compared to traditional finger-prick tests, according to a new randomized trial published in The Lancet and presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) conference.
One in two newborns of women with type 1 diabetes may face complications as a result of being exposed to maternal high blood sugar levels, and there has been limited progress, with these birth outcomes not improving in the past 3-4 decades.
Complications can include congenital anomaly, premature birth, stillbirth, need for intensive care after birth, and being larger than average at birth for the baby, and higher rates of pre-eclampsia and Caesarean section for the mother.
The authors of the international trial say that, as a result of these findings, this type of monitoring should now be offered to all pregnant women with type 1 diabetes to help improve outcomes for newborns.
In the study, researchers trialled an implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device that gives 288 glucose recordings per day, allowing users to recognise and respond to changes in blood sugar levels as they occur. They compared this with traditional monitori Continue reading

Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Attributed to Diabetes Among Persons with Diagnosed Diabetes  United States and Puerto Rico, 20002014

Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Attributed to Diabetes Among Persons with Diagnosed Diabetes United States and Puerto Rico, 20002014


Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Attributed to Diabetes Among Persons with Diagnosed Diabetes United States and Puerto Rico, 20002014
Weekly / November 3, 2017 / 66(43);11651170
The incidence of end-stage renal disease attributed to diabetes (ESRD-D) in the U.S. population with diagnosed diabetes began to decline in the mid-1990s.
During 20002014, the age-standardized incidence of ESRD-D has continued to decline significantly in the United States and in most states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. No state experienced an increase in rates.
What are the implications for public health practice?
Continued awareness of diabetes and interventions to reduce the prevalence of risk factors for kidney failure, improve diabetes care, and prevent type 2 diabetes might sustain the decline in ESRD-D incidence rates in the population with diagnosed diabetes.
During 2014, 120,000 persons in the United States and Puerto Rico began treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (i.e., kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation) (1). Among these persons, 44% (approximately 53,000 persons) had diabetes listed as the primary cause of ESRD (ESRD-D) (1). Although the number of persons initiating ESRD-D treatment each year has increased since 1980 (1,2), the ESRD-D incidence rate among persons with diagnosed diabetes has declined since the mid-1990s (2,3). To determine whether ESRD-D incidence has continued to decline in the United States overall and in each state, the District of Columbia (DC), and Puerto Rico, CDC analyzed 20002014 data from the U.S. Renal Data S Continue reading

Children and Type 2 Diabetes: Whats New?

Children and Type 2 Diabetes: Whats New?


Children and Type 2 Diabetes: Whats New?
No one likes hearing that they cant have something, especially the foods they love. Children with Type 2 diabetes have an especially complicated relationship with food. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common; more than 80% of all children and teens with Type 2 diabetes are overweight, and about 40% are clinically obese. Because weight is a contributing factor to Type 2 diabetes, it is important to look for new ways to help children control their weight and to understand which new medical treatments are available. While children have little control over the foods in their environment, some new practices can help them choose healthier foods and eat mindfully. Some new devices and medicines also may potentially help control children and teens glucose levels. It is important to remember that it will most likely be a combination of interventions that will help your child learn to live with the disease and become healthier over time.
One practice that is gaining popularity is called mindful eating or eating with intention. A recent study has showed that when parents restrict food to promote healthier behaviors, it will work in the short-term. However, in the long-term, restrictive eating has proved to be harmful. Children who have restricted diets are at risk for increased eating when they are not hungry, not learning how to self-regulate and trust their bodys signals, thus causing weight gain. The approach to mindful eating is to help the child create a dialog of kindness with his or her own body. Instead of focusing on hunger as a n Continue reading

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