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BREAKING: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

BREAKING: Diabetes Drugs Linked to Alzheimers and Dementia

BREAKING: Diabetes Drugs Linked to Alzheimers and Dementia

If you’re diabetic and you’re taking medication, you’re probably putting your brain at great risk.
Their calling the new study from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine a “Diabetes Game-Changer." It proves that prolonged use of diabetes drugs puts you at risk for a deficiency which can cause neurological problems, including dementia, and even brain shrinkage.
This study used data that was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes. This was a 5-year study that ran from 1996 until 2001. It followed more than 3,000 people who were “at risk” for diabetes.
Participants were divided into three groups.
Group #1 was assigned a special lifestyle change method. They were put on a very specific diet and performed light exercises.
Group #2 was given the diabetes drug metformin.
Group #3 was given a placebo.
The purpose of this study was to see which group had the lowest rates of diabetes and took the longest to develop it. Group #1 beat the others by a landslide.
The study authors were so astounded by their findings that the program morphed into a follow-up study, in which the original participants were followed for several more years.
The researchers found that Group #2 (those taking metformin) were twice as likely as to have a B12 deficiency, and more likely to become anemic.
More shocking yet, it was discovered that they were also more likely to develop neurological problems like Alzheimer’s and Dementia.
Yet, for unknown reasons, the Diabetes-Institute-funded research didn’t follow up on the special diet procedure completed by Group #1.
It’s everywhere, dang Continue reading

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Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible at Scale?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible at Scale?

If you’re reading this, you probably know that I’m obsessed with longevity. But to really understand longevity, you must understand metabolic health, insulin resistance and, by extension, one of its end-results: type 2 diabetes (T2D). Though my medical practice does not focus on type 2 diabetes, I have taken care of several patients with T2D over the past few years. When I was in medical school I was taught many things about T2D, but one stands out most: T2D is incurable, I was told. Once you have it, you’ve always got it, and the best one can do is “manage” it as a chronic—but irreversible—condition.
But is this really true? Asked another way, is T2D reversible?
My obsession is partly due to my personal journey to better metabolic health, which I’ve documented elsewhere on this blog, and spoken about publicly. But those facts alone, don’t fully explain why I wanted to be involved with Virta Health (I’ll get to them shortly). T2D is a massive societal problem that has the potential to literally bankrupt countries: More than 29 million Americans have T2D and more than 80 million are pre-diabetic. And whether you view it through the lens of population health, or the lens of an individual patient, T2D is perhaps the biggest healthcare challenge of our generation.
At the population level, T2D costs Americans more than $300 billion per year: one of every three Medicare dollars is spent on T2D, and one of every six healthcare dollars is spent on T2D. At the individual level, patients and payers (employers and insurance companies) spend thousands of dollars (of Continue reading

Type Two Diabetes is Reversible

Type Two Diabetes is Reversible

Type two diabetes is curable if you ignore your doctor’s advice. Diabetes is not the hopeless disease that most doctors would have us believe it is though it is a long losing battle if you walk the trail western medicine wants you to travel.
Like all the chronic diseases, the western medical establishment does not want you or your doctor to become conscious of the real causes of diabetes and it certainly does not want you to receive treatments that will prevent diabetes from destroying your life.
Hard but true words to define the nature of most diabetic care. One out of three Americans now alive will have the diagnosis before they die writes Dr. Mary Vernon so it is incredibly important for us to understand what causes diabetes and what to do about it.
There are doctors who do cure diabetes and how do they do it? The first thing such doctors understand is that diabetes is inflammatory disease caused by a combination of factors including stress, chemical and heavy metal toxicity, radiation exposure, magnesium, iodine and bicarbonate deficiencies; and nutritional imbalances focused on excessive carbohydrate intake that all come together to burn down the cellular house in slow motion. Sugar excess and dehydration work to create inflammation in the body and this starts a long process that ends up with people facing major diseases including cancer.
“Monitoring of blood-sugar levels, insulin production, acid-base balance, and pancreatic bicarbonate and enzyme production before and after test exposures to potentially allergic substances reveals that the pancreas is the first o Continue reading

Study Finds Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or Prediabetes

Study Finds Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or Prediabetes

Recently, researchers set out to quantify just how prevalent the disease and its precursor are among American adults. In a large population-based study(jama.jamanetwork.com) published Sept. 8 in JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association, authors examined the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes and related disease trends in U.S. adults from 1988-2012.
One of the most startling findings in this study was that in 2012, more than half of American adults had either diabetes or prediabetes. Also of interest was the fact that more than one-third of those who met the study's criteria for diabetes were unaware they had the disease.
Breakdown of Study Methods
The study used data collected as part of the 1988-94 and the 1999-2000 to 2011-12 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), which are designed to be nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population. Specifically, researchers used data from 2,781 adults from 2011-12 to estimate recent prevalence and an additional 23,634 adults from all NHANES conducted between 1988 and 2010 to estimate trends.
Furthermore, the researchers used two definitions of undiagnosed and total diabetes to bolster the reliability of their results. The first of these defined undiagnosed diabetes as any participant who had
a hemoglobin A1c level of 6.5 percent or greater,
a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level of 126 mg/dL or greater, or
a two-hour plasma glucose (2-hour PG) level of 200 mg/dL or greater (i.e., the hemoglobin A1c, FPG or 2-hour PG definition).
Total diabetes was defined as any part Continue reading

Say goodbye to type 2 diabetes in 8 weeks

Say goodbye to type 2 diabetes in 8 weeks

If you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may be operating under a false belief about your situation…
You may believe that once you’ve crossed the line into type 2 diabetes territory, there’s no going back. You’re stuck with this disease for the rest of your life. But that’s far from the truth.
Sure, it’s not easy to get your metabolic health back in order once it’s gotten that far out of whack. But it is possible. People have done it through diet and exercise.
Or maybe you’ve known for a while that it’s possible to reverse type 2 diabetes through diet and exercise, but you still struggle to nail down (and stick to) an exact plan that will help you do so.
If that’s the case, this latest study from researchers at Newcastle University could help…
A proven diabetes-reversing diet
In a recent study, researchers from Newcastle University found that following a low-calorie diet for eight weeks reverses type 2 diabetes.
In fact, within just one week of starting the low-calorie diet, participants in the study experienced a dramatic improvement in insulin sensitivity, and their fasting blood sugar levels returned to normal.
But be warned… the low-calorie diet used in the study was extreme. Study participants only ate 600 calories per day for eight weeks. The recommended calorie intake for the average adult is between 1,500 and 2,500 calories per day (depending on sex, age and weight loss goals), so that’s quite a difference.
Of course, if you’re considering trying it anyway, you may be wondering why drastically reducing your calorie intake has Continue reading

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