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Blood Pressure Drug Verapamil May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes; Human Trials To Begin Next Year

Blood Pressure Drug Verapamil May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes; Human Trials To Begin Next Year

Blood Pressure Drug Verapamil May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes; Human Trials To Begin Next Year

It’s really expensive for pharmaceutical companies to develop a single new drug. According to Forbes, it can cost anywhere from $1.3 billion to $5 billion. Because of this, it makes drug companies very happy when they discover one of their drugs can be used for other health conditions — after all, more people treated means more money in executive’s pockets. Well, a case like this was just discovered. Researchers from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, found that the common blood pressure drug verapamil completely reversed type 1 diabetes in mice, and they expect to test the drug on humans next year.
Type 1 diabetes is the less-common form of the disease, comprising only five percent of those diagnosed with diabetes, and mostly appearing in kids and young adults. Nevertheless, it’s just as serious. Patients’ bodies are unable to produce insulin, cells can’t get energy, and the blood is overcome with sugar. As its sugar levels increase, the researchers found, so do levels of a protein called TXNIP. It turns out that this protein also kills the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas known as beta cells — the higher their levels, the more beta cells are killed. Thus, diabetes progresses.
This is where verapamil comes in. The drug is normally used to treat blood pressure and irregular heartbeats by relaxing blood vessels and increasing blood and oxygen to the heart, but it has also been found to reduce levels of TXNIP in beta cells. In doing so, insulin production can restart, and diabetes reverses. “We… know that treatment definitely creates an environmen Continue reading

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Stanford’s Robert Sapolsky Demystifies Depression, Which, Like Diabetes, Is Rooted in Biology

Stanford’s Robert Sapolsky Demystifies Depression, Which, Like Diabetes, Is Rooted in Biology

We know that depression affects people from all walks of life. Rich. Poor. Celebs. Ordinary Joes. Young. Old. But, somehow after the death of Robin Williams, there's a renewed focus on depression, and my mind turned immediately to a lecture we featured on the site way back in 2009. The lecture is by Robert Sapolsky, a Stanford biologist, who has a talent for making scientific subjects publicly accessible. A recipient of the MacArthur genius grant, Sapolsky notes that depression --- currently the 4th greatest cause of disability worldwide, and soon the 2nd -- is deeply biological. Depression is rooted in biology, much as is, say, diabetes. As the lecture unfolds, you will see how depression changes the body. When depressed, our brains function differently while sleeping, our stress response goes way up 24/7, our biochemistry levels change, etc. You will see that biology is at work.
Sapolsky is one compelling teacher. So you might not want to miss his Stanford course, Introduction to Human Biology. It's equally worth your time. You can always find it housed in our collection 1,300 Free Online Courses from Top Universities.
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Studies That Really Trash Statins Overlooked by Most Doctors and the FDA

Studies That Really Trash Statins Overlooked by Most Doctors and the FDA

In the past, some MDs have proposed that statin drugs should be put into our water supplies and handed out to fast food customers. As if fluoridated water posing as a necessary mass medicine that turns out to be toxic isn’t enough.
One out of four Americans aged 55 or over are on a statin drug, most of whom are without cardiovascular and heart problems. Many are prescribed statins solely for high cholesterol, even as the FDA finally got around to forcing some, not all, of their side effects on statin labels and ads.
Maybe Pfizer wasn’t content with their sales revenue of $140 billion while its patent on Lipitor was in effect. Now other pharmaceutical companies continue to rake in profits with their statin drug versions while MDs and cardiologists push them on ignorant middle-aged folks that think their doctors know best. Even many young people are now being scammed into taking a statin prescriptions due to an outdated attitude towards LDL vs. HDL levels.
Dr. Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, author of Death by Modern Medicine, and passionate promoter of magnesium supplementation, posted an abstract from a Japanese study that scientifically indicts statin drugs as perpetrators of bad heart health rather than the proclaimed solutions of heart health.
Pfizer must have spent many millions of dollars on just this one ad. The implication is clear, you will not die as long as your blood “cholesterol” is low and you had better take a statin for it if it isn’t. This was and is a lie. In primary prevention there is no evidence any life has been prolonged by a statin. The corollary impl Continue reading

GMO Insulin Causes Type 1 Diabetes in Type 2 Diabetics, Study Finds

GMO Insulin Causes Type 1 Diabetes in Type 2 Diabetics, Study Finds

Last year, we reported on the dangers of insulin therapy for type 2 diabetics, following the publication of a study comprised of almost 85,000 type 2 diabetic patients that found insulin monotherapy doubled their risk of all-cause mortality, in addition to significantly increasing their risk for diabetes-related complications and cancer. Insulin monotherapy resulted in:
2.0 times more myocardial infarctions.
1.7 time more major adverse cardiac events
1.4 time more strokes
3.5 times more renal complications
2.1 time more neuropathy
1.2 times more eye complications
1.4 times more cancer
2.2 times more deaths
Now, a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism titled, "Insulin administration may trigger type 1 diabetes in Japanese type 2 diabetes patients with type 1 diabetes high-risk HLA class II and the insulin gene VNTR genotype," is shedding light on a possible explanation for why insulin treatment may accelerate morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetics. The study revealed that giving genetically susceptible type 2 diabetes patients recombinant insulin can trigger their bodies to target their own insulin producing cells for autoimmune destruction, effectively producing 'double diabetes': type 1 and type 2, as a result.
The Japanese study took 6 patients (4 men and 2 women) with type 2 diabetes, none of whom had previously received insulin therapy nor had markers for autoantibodies to their own insulin (e.g. GAD65). All patients were found to have the type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene known as type 1 diabetes high risk HLA class II (IDDM1) Continue reading

Food stamp soda ban can save 141,000 children from obesity

Food stamp soda ban can save 141,000 children from obesity

Banning soda and other sugary drinks from food stamps would lead to significant drops in obesity and diabetes rates among the poor, according to a new study.
It would prevent at least 141,000 kids from getting fat and another 240,000 adults from developing Type 2 diabetes, the kind that usually stems from obesity, according to Stanford University medical researchers in a study published in the June issue of the academic journal Health Affairs.
"It's as big an impact as I've seen," said lead researcher Sanjay Basu, an assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center.
Basu started the study to explore criticism that the federal food stamp program, officially called Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), subsidizes the purchase of sugary drinks that offer no nutritional value.
Over the years, several studies have shown that poor families on food stamps tend to have much higher rates of obesity and diabetes than the rest of the population.
"There are complaints that (taxpayers) are getting charged twice, once for the SNAP program and then again for the Medicaid and Medicare costs when people get diseases," Basu said.
Food stamps is big business for the beverage industry. A separate 2012 study found more than $2 billion in food stamps each year goes to sales of sugary drinks, according to Yale University researchers. That amounted to 58% of beverages purchased on food stamps.
Overall, obesity rates among food stamps users would go down by 2.4% over 10 years, according to the study. That might not seem like much for the 46.1 million people w Continue reading

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