diabetestalk.net

Bitter Melon, Diabetes

Bitter Melon, Diabetes

Bitter Melon, Diabetes

I spent the last three weeks writing about low-carb eating. But at least one fruit, called bitter melon, seems to be a powerful treatment for diabetes, even if you do eat a lot of carbs.
In reply to my column on reversing Type 2 diabetes, Debbie commented,
My husband was diagnosed with Type 2 four months ago… he had a blood glucose reading of 370. [The] doctor put him on metformin — 1,000 mg a day, which brought his blood glucose down to the low 200’s. So the doctor upped his meds to 2,000 mg a day.
Then someone told her about bitter melon tea, and she bought some at a local Asian grocery. He started drinking one cup of tea in the morning and one in the evening. The very next day, his fasting glucose dropped to around 80. He stopped his metformin and his fasting glucose levels have been under 100 ever since.
His A1C dropped from 13.5 to 6.3. Since he has only been on the tea for a few weeks, his A1C will probably drop further at the next test. This is a man who is heavy, eats lots of pasta and rice, and whose exercise is “walking the dog twice a week.” Nothing else in his lifestyle has changed.
Debbie is sure it’s the bitter melon tea that’s controlling the blood glucose. But one person’s experience is not enough. It’s “anecdotal evidence.” Is there any scientific backup for his story? Not much, but some.
A study by researchers in Australia, China, and Germany found that four compounds in bitter melon that “activate an enzyme that is responsible for… transporting glucose from the blood into the cells.” The enzyme is called AMPK, the same one acti Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
FDA Approves The First Automated Insulin System For Type 1 Diabetes

FDA Approves The First Automated Insulin System For Type 1 Diabetes

The Food and Drug Administration's approval of a new insulin delivery system for people with Type 1 diabetes is a big deal.
With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas makes little or no insulin so people have to replace it with either multiple daily injections or a pump. In either case, that process involves constant error-prone adjustments, particularly around food and exercise. Over the long term, high blood sugar levels can lead to organ damage, but over-correcting by giving more insulin can cause dangerous low blood sugars that can lead to unconsciousness.
The device, Medtronic's MiniMed 670G hybrid closed loop system, is made up of an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor (CGM), both of which are already on the market separately. The new part involves the communication between the two devices.
Medtronic's previous system already had a feature that would shut down the insulin pump if the wearer's blood sugar dropped too low. But the 670G predicts when a person's blood sugar is dropping and prevents the low in the first place, and also corrects high blood sugars.
This is the first such machine in the world with that level of automation, and thus it is informally being called the first "artificial pancreas" system.
However, it's called a hybrid rather than a fully closed-loop system because users will still need to signal that they're about to eat and estimate the carbohydrate count of the food so the device can calculate the additional amount of insulin needed. That means there's still the possibility of mistakes. But now if that count is off, the 670G will correct the err Continue reading

This Teenager Wants You To Know What Diabetes Really Looks Like

This Teenager Wants You To Know What Diabetes Really Looks Like

This is Madeline Milzark, an 18-year-old from Missouri. She's had type 1 diabetes for almost 10 years now.
There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. While both type 1 and type 2 are chronic conditions, type 1 is typically diagnosed in children, and type 2 is often diagnosed later in life. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy.
Last week Milzark wrote a Facebook post about what it's like to live with diabetes, and people have been sharing it across the globe.
"It's a disease that isn't picky when it chooses who to attack, it doesn't care if you're 2 months old or if you're 73. It doesn't care if you eat Big Macs and McChickens every day of your life or if you're a strict vegan who goes to the gym daily. Diabetes is me. Diabetes is a whole ton of people who fight for their life every single day and go to bed not sure if they're going to wake up the next morning. So before you tag your huge dessert #Diabetes, think about what #Diabetes really looks like".
Madeline says she's received hundreds of positive messages from the post, which has been shared over 5,000 times.
Facebook / Via facebook.com
She decided to write the post after her blood sugar crashed, resulting in her collapsing while home alone. It was sugar supplied by her grandmother that saved her life.
Madeline had her phone at the time and was able to text her grandmother, who brought her the sugar: "If she didn't there was no telling how long it would've taken her to find me and it would've probably been too late by then."
"I have to monitor my Continue reading

Insulin pill may delay type 1 diabetes in some

Insulin pill may delay type 1 diabetes in some

(HealthDay)—It's often said that timing is everything. New research suggests this may be true when giving an insulin pill to try to prevent or delay type 1 diabetes.
Researchers tested the effect of insulin pills on 560 children and adults whose relatives had type 1 diabetes. For most of them, the drug had no effect on whether or not they developed type 1 diabetes, or how quickly they developed it.
But for those at the highest risk of developing type 1 diabetes sooner rather than later, insulin pill therapy delayed the time it took to develop the full-blown disease by about two-and-a-half years, the researchers said.
"This is the largest study using oral insulin," said the study's lead author, Dr. Carla Greenbaum. Participants also had known autoantibodies that indicated a very high risk of developing type 1 diabetes in their lifetimes, said Greenbaum, chair of Diabetes TrialNet.
Jessica Dunne, director of discovery research for JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), called the results "a huge success."
"We finally, for the first time, have been able to show a delay in the progression of type 1 diabetes," said Dunne. But the findings need to be replicated in additional studies, she added.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It's far less common than type 2 diabetes, which is linked to excess weight and a sedentary lifestyle.
Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone. It's necessary for ushering the sugar from food into the body's cells for fuel. People with type 1 diabetes have little to no insulin because their immune system mistakenly attacked h Continue reading

Your child is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. These families have been there

Your child is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. These families have been there

Brooke Miller, a college freshman at the University of Florida, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 3.
“I don’t really remember my life without it because I was so young,” says the 18-year-old.
Her earliest memories are of feeling tired at school and her mother coming to give her insulin injections. She also remembers sitting on the kitchen floor at her Weston home trying to prick her finger to check her blood-sugar levels. “I wanted to be independent and do it on my own.”
Over the last 10 years, however, new technology such as the continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump have been introduced and are becoming more sophisticated, allowing patients such as Miller more freedom and power over managing their condition.
Never miss a local story.
Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.
SUBSCRIBE NOW
When Miller started using a CGM four years ago, providing her with a 24-7 reading of her glucose levels, she went from having to prick her finger six to seven times a day to calibrating the device and pricking her finger only two to three times per day. The CGM communicates with an insulin pump, which maintains the body’s glucose levels.
Brooke Miller has Type 1 diabetes.
ADP Andrew Duany
In Type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks part of the pancreas, destroying insulin-producing cells called islets. This leads to either no insulin produced or a severe shortage of the valuable hormone. It also results in dangerously high blood sugar levels, which can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves and the heart, and can lead to diabe Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • November: World Diabetes Day and Diabetes Awareness Month!

    With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-dis ...

  • Diabetes and Hypertension: A Position Statement by the American Diabetes Association

    Hypertension is common among patients with diabetes, with the prevalence depending on type and duration of diabetes, age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI, history of glycemic control, and the presence of kidney disease, among other factors (1–3). Furthermore, hypertension is a strong risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), heart failure, and microvascular complications. ASCVD— ...

  • Type 1 Diabetes vs. Type 2 Diabetes

    Diabetes affects over 29 million people in the United States, and 1 in 4 of those affected are unaware that they have diabetes.[1] Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in younger people and occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body cannot use the insulin it produces. This disease, frequently related to obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and genetics, is most oft ...

  • Diabetes and Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose and Diabetes

    Treat Apnea to Control Diabetes? Sleep apnea can affect diabetes control in many ways. Struggling for air may put your body into fight-or-flight mode, releasing stress hormones that can raise blood glucose levels. If you're tired, you won't want to take that walk around the block after lunch. While you're at work, you might keep snacking to stay awake. But can treating sleep apnea lead to better b ...

  • Diabetes and life expectancy: What effect does type 2 diabetes have?

    Diabetes can cause serious health complications and have an impact on life expectancy. How much a person's life is reduced depends on a combination of factors, such as the severity of the case, additional complications, and response to treatment. After being diagnosed, most people with diabetes want to know how the condition will affect the length and quality of their life. Each individual varies, ...

  • Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

    Are you diabetic? Does your body emanate bad breath which it has never done before? Do not worry. You are not the only one experiencing something of this sort. The high level of blood glucose combined with many complications in diabetes tends to cause body odor in the patients. In this article, we shall analyze the reasons and the relationship between diabetes and body odor. Join in for the articl ...

  • Double Diabetes: Dealing with Insulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes

    Recently, Glu published a Call to Action to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in response to their recent report highlighting a significant reduction in newly diagnosed cases of diabetes. Although it appeared to represent significant progress in reducing the global obesity epidemic, the report was soon regarded as problematic, largely due to the lack of distinction between type ...

  • Difference between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus

    Diabetes Mellitus It is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level), glycosuria (glucose in urine), polyuria ( increased volume of urine due to the osmotic effect of glucose), polydipsia (excessivie thirst), polyphagia (excessive appetite). It is due to the hyposecretion of insulin or lack of insulin. It is of two types:- Diabetes Type I and Diabetes Type II. Diabetes Type I (Insulin D ...

  • Diabetes and eye disease: How diabetes affects vision and eye health

    One of the complications associated with diabetes is eye disease. Diabetes can wreak havoc on your vision and eye health, in some cases leading to vision loss. If you have diabetes, it’s important that you keep your condition well managed. If you don’t, you should take the necessary preventative measures to reduce your risk and protect your vision along with overall health. Regardless of the t ...

Related Articles