diabetestalk.net

Biopharma Steps Up As Diabetes Epidemic Goes Global

Biopharma Steps Up as Diabetes Epidemic Goes Global

Biopharma Steps Up as Diabetes Epidemic Goes Global

This May, the World Health Organization (WHO) named its new Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Chebreyesus, the first African to ever lead the WHO. During his candidacy, he spoke powerfully about the challenges of people trying to survive with diabetes in low- and middle-income countries, including his native Ethiopia, where the Ethiopian Diabetes Association became the nation’s first patient-based association.
Today is World Diabetes Day, and the era when the disease was primarily a “wealthy nation” problem are over. In the developing world, we are witnessing a shift, where communicable diseases such as malaria are on the decline while chronic diseases like cancer and diabetes are on the rise. An estimated 422 million adults worldwide were living with diabetes in 2014, according to the WHO. Global prevalence has nearly doubled since 1980. Shockingly, nearly nine percent of the world’s adult population is now diabetic.
Rates are rising faster in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. The greatest global increases are in Pacific island nations, followed by the Middle East and North Africa in countries like Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, according to a 2016 study. American Samoa had the highest diabetes rate in the world, with more than 30 percent of the population afflicted.
Globally, more than 11 percent of all adults with the disease live in China. Meanwhile, Pakistan, Mexico and Indonesia – where age-adjusted diabetes rates have doubled – are all now in the top 10 countries with the highest percentage of cases.
Here in the United Sta Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Study: Countries That Use More High Fructose Corn Syrup Have More Diabetes

Study: Countries That Use More High Fructose Corn Syrup Have More Diabetes

The 20 percent increase in type 2 diabetes is independent of total sugar consumption and obesity.
PROBLEM: Is high fructose corn syrup the harbinger of the health apocalypse? A review of the debate in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition rejects HFCS as a causative factor of obesity, arguing that the processed stuff, though scary-sounding, "is not meaningfully different in composition or metabolism from other fructose-glucose sweeteners like sucrose, honey, and fruit juice concentrates." But those in the anti-HFCS camp aren't convinced, and would insist there's still plenty to be wary of -- they point to diabetes as another public health concern whose rise parallels the increased prevalence of HFCS in foods and beverages.
METHODOLOGY: "It's very hard to study the effects of high fructose corn syrup on overall health," explained lead author Michael Goran, Professor of Preventive Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, and Pediatrics at USC, "Because we simply don't know how much we're consuming, even in the U.S." So he and fellow researchers at USC and Oxford took a broader, population-based approach, looking at estimates for the prevalence of type 2 diabetes -- culled from two independent sources -- as related to the availability of HFCS in 43 countries. They also looked at the total availability of sugar and calories, along with estimated rates of obesity and impaired glucose tolerance, and each country's GDP.
RESULTS: "All indicators of diabetes were higher in countries that use HFCS as compared to those that do not," with type 2 diabetes occurring in 8 percent of the Continue reading

Diabetes’ JDRF Tries Shock Ad to Push the FDA

Diabetes’ JDRF Tries Shock Ad to Push the FDA

This is not a story about statistics, yet I have to start there. It is not a story about a shocking ad that ran in the New York Times and Washington Post, yet the uproar started there.
This is the story of how approximately 150,000 people with type 1 diabetes will die, and one among them, a vibrant, healthy and lovely 17-year-old girl who did die, due to a side effect of insulin.
Insulin, which many think is a cure for type 1 diabetes, is not a cure but a medicine that lowers blood sugar. Sometimes so much, that you die. Did you know that?
This ad ran on Nov. 2 and touched off seismic aftershocks among diabetes bloggers and online advocates.
Most who read the ad were stunned. Parents who have a child with diabetes were terrified or angered. The emotional-hit prompted many to question such an unbelievable figure: 1 in 20 people (an estimated 2-4 percent and 6 percent in patients younger than 40 years old) will perish from severe hypoglycemia.
Of the estimated 3 million people in the U.S. with type 1 diabetes, that’s approximately 150,000 people. That’s like wiping out Chattanooga, Tenn. or Rockford, Ill. — wiping them right off the map.
Aaron Kowalski, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) vice president, who’s been in charge of hypoglycemia research funding and helped launch, and still oversees, the Artificial Pancreas Project immediately responded to the uproar online.
He said JDRF ran the ad because they want the FDA to understand that tools and technologies, such as artificial pancreas technologies, exist to minimize dangerous low blood sugar; that researc Continue reading

NHS to give free Fitbits and one-to-one weight loss coaching to thousands of obese Brits in bid to slash diabetes

NHS to give free Fitbits and one-to-one weight loss coaching to thousands of obese Brits in bid to slash diabetes

THOUSANDS of tubby Brits will be given free fitness trackers and one-to-one weight loss coaching on the NHS at a cost of £1.2million.
Health chiefs hope the pilot project will help 5,000 at risk of type 2 diabetes keep the disease at bay.
Getty Images - Getty
Patients will be given a mix of wristbands, phone apps, weighing scales, and podcasts and be monitored for up to a year.
The gadgets will work with nutrition and health advice, stress counselling, and personal coaching sessions. The exact combination an individual receives depends on which of five schemes they are enrolled on.
The wristbands will monitor exercise, sleep quality and eating frequency, while the apps will deliver motivational messages and track users’ progress. Support staff will deliver most sessions via phone or video calls.
NHS England, Public Health England and Diabetes UK will launch the project in eight areas this month.
Getty - Contributor
Interventions that prove most successful could be rolled out nationwide. Simon Stevens, of NHS England, said “This is the latest example of the NHS getting practical and serious about new ways to support people staying healthy.”
Diabetes can lead to amputations or early death and accounts for ten per cent of NHS spending. Type 2 diabetes is linked to being overweight and is largely preventable.
Kid friendly TV ads for sugary cereals blamed for child obesity crisis Continue reading

Good Food List for Diabetes

Good Food List for Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association published extensive dietary recommendations for adults with diabetes in the November 2013 issue of “Diabetes Care.” In this report, the association does not recommend any 1 specific diet that all people with diabetes should follow. Instead, the ADA provides a framework for healthy eating that can be tailored to personal preferences and individual needs. Generally, the ADA recommends a diet composed mostly of nutrient-dense whole foods. This means eating natural, unprocessed foods whenever possible and avoiding fast food. Aim to eat a variety of nutritious foods, including nonstarchy vegetables, lean meats, low-fat dairy products and healthy fats and oils.
Video of the Day
The ADA recommends that you fill half your plate with nonstarchy vegetables. Such vegetables are nutrient powerhouses but low in calories and carbohydrates, so filling up on veggies can help with portion control. The list of nonstarchy vegetables includes leafy greens such as spinach, kale, collards, turnips, mustard and lettuce. Broccoli, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are perfect for roasting or steaming. Celery, carrots, radishes and bell pepper strips make good snacks and salad toppers. Mushrooms, onions and garlic are easily added to soups, stews and omelets. So put vegetables on the shopping list and load up on your favorites.
Lean Meats and Fatty Fish
Protein is an important part of a healthy diet. In people with type 2 diabetes, protein may improve the body's ability to respond to insulin. Good sources of protein include chicken, turkey, lean cuts of beef and Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • 'Diabetes epidemic in Indigenous populations' highlights disparity

    About eight in 10 Indigenous Canadians who are young adults will develop Type 2 diabetes in their lifetimes compared with five in 10 in the general population, a new study suggests. To make the projection published in Monday's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, researchers in Alberta used data on a population of 2.8 million adults who were free of diabetes in the province and follo ...

  • Fighting the diabetes epidemic the way public health has fought HIV

    In the U.S. and other high-income countries, diabetes is a good news, bad news scenario. On one hand, people who have diabetes today fare better than they did 20 years ago. They are living longer and suffering fewer complications, such as heart disease, kidney disease, amputations, strokes, and blindness. SEEBRI NEOHALER should not be initiated in patients with acutely deteriorating or potentially ...

  • Diabetes: Fighting the epidemic the way public health has fought HIV

    In the U.S. and other high-income countries, diabetes is a good news, bad news scenario. On one hand, people who have diabetes today fare better than they did 20 years ago. They are living longer and suffering fewer complications, such as heart disease, kidney disease, amputations, strokes, and blindness. On the other hand, more people are developing diabetes than experts even projected, with some ...

  • 'They Never Talked To Me Like A Real Person': Fighting a Diabetes Epidemic With Empathy

    Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 11/15/2017 09:53 am ETUpdatedDec 22, 2017 'They Never Talked To Me Like A Real Person': Fighting a Diabetes Epidemic With Empathy Houston is tapping into faith communities to tackle soaring diabetes rates. Marguerite Butler (left)has worked with nutritionist Joy Ashby Cornthwaite (right), who has helped her under ...

  • Treating Diabetes: Practical Advice for Combatting a Modern Epidemic

    > Treating Diabetes: Practical Advice for Combatting a Modern Epidemic Treating Diabetes: Practical Advice for Combatting a Modern Epidemic Adapted from The Fourfold Path to Healing by Tom Cowan, MD, with Sally Fallon and Jaimen McMillan, to be published Spring 2004, NewTrends Publishing. Diabetes is so common in America and other western countries that its presence in any human group has bec ...

  • Dentists at the Front Line in Diabetes Epidemic

    HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You'd probably be surprised if your dentist said you might have type 2 diabetes. But new research finds that severe gum disease may be a sign the illness is present and undiagnosed. The study found that nearly one in five people with severe gum disease (periodontitis) had type 2 diabetes and didn't know it. The researchers said these f ...

  • WHO | Addressing Asias fast growing diabetes epidemic

    Addressing Asias fast growing diabetes epidemic Hampered by shortages of resources, specialized services and skilled health workers, India and other countries in south-east Asia are scrambling to respond to type 2 diabetes epidemics. Sophie Cousins reports. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2017;95:550-551. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.17.020817 A diabetes nutrition counselling ...

  • India’s Diabetes Epidemic Shifts to Poorer People in More Affluent Cities

    The Indian Council of Medical Research – India Diabetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study is the largest nationally representative study of diabetes in India and includes data from 57000 people across 15 states. As part of the study, each person had their body weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure measured. Glucose tolerance tests were used to diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes. The prevalenc ...

  • High Cost Of Diabetes Drugs Often Goes Overlooked

    When it comes to treating chronic conditions, diabetes drugs aren't nearly as sexy as say, Sovaldi, last year's breakthrough hepatitis C drug that offers a cure for the chronic liver infection at a price approaching six figures. Yet an estimated 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes — about 10 times the number of people with hepatitis C — and many of them will take diabetes drugs for the ...

Related Articles