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Beta Cells And Diabetes

Beta Cells and Diabetes

Beta Cells and Diabetes

If we could only get the beta cells in the pancreas to rejuvenate themselves, we could then cure diabetes. The problem also involves shutting off immune responses, and eliminating behavioral and environmental factors that precipitate diabetes.
When there is an immune response that attacks beta cells, we have Type 1 diabetes. Over a fairly short period of time, it results in complete destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.
If we don’t remove the cells from their high sugar environment, and continue to damage them by subjecting them to high sugar, we run the risk of tipping to Pre-Diabetes, or Type 2 Diabetes.
We need to continually nurture and care for our beta cells, by making sure their environment is not high in sugar, and that they do not have to work too hard. If the beta cells have to work too hard due to high sugar, they will eventually give out. Our beta cells can only take so much.
What are beta cells?
Beta cells are cells that are located in the pancreas, within the Islets of Langerhans. The Islets of Langerhans are in an area of the pancreas that serves to regulate endocrine function, by secreting hormones. The pancreas is involved in secreting insulin, glucagon, and some other hormones.
Beta cells functioning
The beta cells are little insulin producing machines. They manufacture, store, and release insulin via the pancreas. Without their full function, we can develop conditions such as Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes.
In pancreas where there is no Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes process going on, the beta cells respond extremely quickly to Continue reading

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Carbohydrate Tracking Plans for Diabetes Management

Carbohydrate Tracking Plans for Diabetes Management

People with diabetes need to manage what they eat, particularly how many carbohydrates they eat. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, grains, and sugary foods, and are the nutrient that impact blood sugars the most. The amount of carbohydrates one must eat differs from person to person and can be dependent on gender, size, activity level and medication regimens. And while there is no one size fits all diet plan that works for managing diabetes and weight, there are different types of carbohydrate tracking methods that can help you to keep carbohydrates and blood sugars at goal.
These include the older, but easy to use --exchange plan, counting carbohydrates in grams and consistent carbohydrate diet.
Tracking your food intake can help you to eat similarly daily which can provide information on how your body responds to food. Knowing how foods affect your blood sugar gives you the tools to maintain better control. Keeping track of carbohydrates is something that people with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes should do.
Before You Start:
Carbohydrates are the most important part of the food you eat. They directly affect your blood glucose almost immediately after you eat them. All three tracking methods below help you keep your carbs in balance. 15 grams of carbohydrate equals one carbohydrate choice. How do you know what 15 grams of carbs is? It's not always easy. First, set up an appointment with a dietitian or certified diabetes educator, if you can. Also, most food labels list nutrition facts list carbs.
There are also books, apps, and online resources to help you Continue reading

Coconut Oil and Diabetes

Coconut Oil and Diabetes

Does it Really Cure Diabetes?
Of course, we tend to lean on the medication instead of a natural alternative to cure diabetes.
"So how does 'coconut oil and diabetes' works?" you ask. You might think it is not possible for coconut oil to cure diabetes. However, a certain number of diabetics who take coconut oil are getting better and better.
By taking coconut oil everyday combined to following the medical advice, many people can reduce the level of blood sugar to the normal range.
It only takes a certain period of time -- months, if not weeks.
Some can even cut back the amount of medications they've been taking for years!
Let's take few minutes to learn about what diabetes is...
What is Diabetes?
Diabetes mellitus is a disorder stage of metabolism. It will lower the capability of the pancreas to produce insulin in order to help glucose get into the body's cell.
Then the body will convert the glucose into energy for utilization.
What will happen if you have fewer insulin?
Yes, the blood sugar does not fully absorb into the cells.
Some of them is left in the blood stream. And you will have high blood sugar.
This condition can cause you negative effect on your body.
It is possible for the excessive blood sugar to turn into the fat sticking to the arterial wall.
This will make the blood vessel narrow, causing a blockage to the blood flow.
Finally, you may have many health problems such as slow wound healing, numb feeling, blurry eyesight, feeling tired easily, and more.
Coconut oil and diabetes can be a new hope for you to heal diabetes. Not only does it help regulate the blood Continue reading

Managing type 2 diabetes: how low-carb diets can help

Managing type 2 diabetes: how low-carb diets can help

The obesity epidemic in Australia is resulting in an alarming increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes.
Approximately 1 million Australian adults have type 2 diabetes and it is estimated over 2 million people are pre-diabetic and are at high risk of developing this disease.
That’s around 13 per cent of our entire population! It’s easy to see why our health researchers have made it a priority to discover better ways to prevent and manage this serious disease.
To better understand the importance of diet when managing type 2 diabetes, we undertook one of the largest and complex diet and lifestyle intervention studies in Australia, in collaboration with the University of Adelaide, Flinders University and the University of South Australia.
The two year study compared different dietary approaches for managing type 2 diabetes: a low carbohydrate, high protein, high healthy fat diet and a traditional high-unrefined carbohydrate, low fat diet. All participants also participated in a supervised exercise program.
Significant results
One of the most significant findings for those people who followed the low carbohydrate diet was a staggering 40 per cent reduction in the amount of diabetes medication they required, twice as effective as the high carbohydrate, low fat diet. The low carbohydrate diet was also three times more effective at reducing blood glucose spikes across the day.
The results of the study is creating a paradigm shift in our thinking about how we should manage type 2 diabetes.
For the millions of Australians who are overweight and have or at risk of developing Continue reading

Low-carb and type 2 diabetes

Low-carb and type 2 diabetes

Is a low-carb approach to eating an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes? It seems so, according to a spate of recent research!
The CSIRO, in collaboration with several universities and research institutions, undertook a large and complex diet and lifestyle intervention study to better understand methods for managing type 2 diabetes.
Over 1 year, 115 participants with type 2 diabetes were split into two groups for eating:
a low-carbohydrate (14% carbohydrates at 50g per day; 28% protein; 58% fat (<10% saturated)) group
high-unrefined carbohydrate (53% carbohydrates; 17% protein; 30% fat (<10% saturated)) group.
The dietary protocols were energy matched, and they did this alongside an exercise program.1
Those on the low-carb regime experienced a whopping 40% decrease in medication requirements, 2 times that of the high-carb low-fat diet – who consumed 205g per day. And the low-carb diet was 3x more effective for reducing spikes in blood glucose throughout a day.
“Health professionals have been divided over the best dietary approach for managing type 2 diabetes, and the ongoing uncertainty is a hotly debated topic amongst clinicians and researchers,” said Associate Professor Grant Brinkworth and study author.
“This research shows that traditional dietary approaches for managing type 2 diabetes could be outdated, we really need to review the current dietary guidelines if we are serious about using the latest scientific evidence to reduce the impact of the disease.”
More recently, a U.K. based systematic review of intervention studies involving participants with ty Continue reading

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