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Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

Best vegetables for type 2 diabetes

Best vegetables for type 2 diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes often feel left out at big family meals and at restaurants, but it should not mean having to avoid delicious food.
In fact, no food item is strictly forbidden for people with type 2 diabetes. Healthy eating for people with diabetes is all about moderation and balance.
The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, rich in fiber, or high in blood pressure-lowering nitrates.
Why choose vegetables?
When considering foods to avoid, many people with diabetes might think about sugary or high-carbohydrate foods, such as cinnamon rolls or bread. Certain vegetables, though, can also cause blood glucose problems.
The GI refers to how quickly foods cause blood sugar levels to rise. Foods high on the GI, such as most potatoes, rapidly release glucose, potentially triggering blood glucose spikes. They can also cause weight gain when eaten in excess.
Low to moderate GI vegetables, such as carrots, offer better blood glucose control, and a lower risk of weight gain.
Nitrates are chemicals that naturally occur in some vegetables. They are also used as preservatives in some foods.
Eating nitrate-rich foods, not foods processed with added nitrates, can lower blood pressure, and improve overall circulatory health.
This means that nitrate-rich foods, such as beets, are among the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes who have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This is still true despite their high level of carbohydrates.
The key to good food management, in this instance, is to reduce carbohydrate consumption elsewher Continue reading

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10 Worst Foods for Diabetes

10 Worst Foods for Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most common diseases, affecting more people than ever before. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA):
In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the population, had diabetes. Of that, 21.0 million were diagnosed and 8.1 million were undiagnosed.
Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults had Type 1 diabetes in 2012.
Diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the United States as of 2010.
These statistics may be scary, and the numbers may get even worse in the coming years.
Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which a person suffers from a high level of glucose in the blood. High blood sugar levels are caused either by a lack of insulin production (Type 1 diabetes) or insulin resistance in the body (Type 2 diabetes).
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When suffering from diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels under control or else it can affect different parts and organs of the body, from your eyes to your toes.
Diet plays a significant role in managing the disease. There are some foods that can help lower the risk of diabetes and help with blood sugar management. On the other hand, certain foods can exacerbate the symptoms and medical complications.
Here are the 10 worst foods for diabetics as well as people who are at risk of developing diabetes.
1. White Bread
White bread is a staple in many breakfast menus. It may be quick and convenient to have a slice or two of white bread with some jam or butter before leaving the house. But for diabetics, white bread is not a good option.
White bread is made of refine Continue reading

8 Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet

8 Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet

1 / 9 Best Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet
When you have type 2 diabetes, eating low-carb vegetables is a smart way to fill up without filling out your waistline — or spiking your blood sugar levels. Non-starchy or low-carbohydrate veggies are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber while still being low in calories. It’s always smart to eat a rainbow-colored diet, but the following veggies are among the best. Continue reading

List of the Right Vegetables for Diabetes

List of the Right Vegetables for Diabetes

Vegetables add bright colors, flavors and textures to your diet. They are rich in vitamins, minerals, water, dietary fiber, phytochemicals and antioxidants and contribute to a healthy diet. Vegetables are generally low in calories and carbohydrates, making them an excellent option for diabetics. Vegetables fall into two groups: starchy and non-starchy. Starchy vegetables are higher in carbohydrates and raise blood glucose levels more easily. Non-starchy vegetables are the best choice for a diabetic meal plan.
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Rich in calcium, vitamins A, B, C and K, magnesium, iron, protein, potassium and dietary fiber, dark leafy greens are perfect for a diabetic diet. Leafy greens include spinach, kale, broccoli, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, arugula, mustard or collard greens, romaine lettuce and chard. Each of these vegetables contains approximately 5 g of carbohydrates per serving, with a serving equal to 1 cup raw or a ½ cup cooked vegetables. Eating a mixed green salad before or with your meal is a good way to incorporate leafy greens into your diabetic meal plan.
Tomatoes contain lycopene, a potent antioxidant known to help fight disease. Tomatoes are also rich in potassium, phosphorus, calcium, vitamin A, C and K, folate and dietary fiber. A ½ cup serving of tomatoes is equivalent to 4 g of carbohydrates. Eat them raw, pureed, stewed, juiced or in a sauce; all tomato-based products are low in carbohydrates. When purchasing tomato-based products, be sure to choose "no sugar added" or "low sodium" varieties.
Bell peppers are available in a rainbow of colors, includi Continue reading

Is watermelon a good fruit for people with diabetes?

Is watermelon a good fruit for people with diabetes?

Watermelon is a good fruit choice for people with diabetes, but many people mistakenly think that it is not. The reason has to do with the difference between glycemic index and its glycemic load.
The Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of the effects of carbohydrates on blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion, releasing glucose rapidly into the bloodstream (like those found in white bread), have a “high GI” (70 or higher); carbohydrates that break down slowly, releasing glucose gradually into the bloodstream (like those in whole grains and legumes), have a “low GI” (55 or lower).
The Glycemic Load (GL) is a ranking system for the glycemic impact of foods, based on their carbohydrate content, portion size, and Glycemic Index. Low = 1 to 10; Medium = 11-19; High = 20 or higher.
As explained in the book The New Glucose Revolution for Diabetes (Marlowe, 2007), the GL was developed by Harvard researchers, who posited that eating a small amount of a high-GI food would have the same effect on blood sugar as would eating large amounts of a low-GI food. Another issue with looking only at the GI of a food is that it’s tied to the number of grams of carbohydrates in that food and, obviously, that number varies by large amounts. Watermelon is a good illustration of this problem. Watermelon’s GI is high, 72. The GI, however, is based not on a normal portion, but on 50g of carbohydrates — whatever the food. To get 50g of watermelon carbs, you’d have to eat almost 5 cups. GL combines both the quality and the quantity of the actual carbohyd Continue reading

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