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Best Supplements: Diabetes REVERSED With This £1 A Day Natural Vitamin

Best supplements: Diabetes REVERSED with this £1 a day natural vitamin

Best supplements: Diabetes REVERSED with this £1 a day natural vitamin

Ojamin Herb & Fruit uses 14 natural ingredients, and could reverse fatty liver diseases, which in most cases are the cause for type 2 diabetes, scientists have revealed. The findings could lead to a reversal in type 2 diabetes, the company said.
The supplement, which costs £30 for a one months supply, is available as a bottled tonic, as a sachet, or as a capsule.
Fatty liver diseases are found in more than 75 per cent of diabetics. The condition causes fatty deposits to build up, making the body resistant to insulin.
But, Ojamin showed “promise” in preventing type 2 diabetes from developing in those with liver diseases.
This is a great news for those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and looking for an all-natural supplement to help in prevention
“We are delighted with the findings, which support the legacy of personal experiences and testimonials offered by Ojamin users over many years,” said Pete Tate, founder of the supplement’s manufacturer.
“This is a great news for those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and looking for an all-natural supplement to help in prevention.
“We are pursuing further clinical trials and believe this is the world’s first truly effective fully natural medicine for diabetics.”
Ojamin Herb & Fruit supplements helped to restart mitochondrial function in liver disease patients, according to a study by the Innovative Concepts in Drug Development.
The supplement is made up of aloe vera, basil, beleric, bitter melon, cumin, gooseberry, ball, haritaki, fenugreek, java plum, neem, okra, turmeric and watermelon seeds.
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Hyperglycemia and Ketone Testing

Hyperglycemia and Ketone Testing

Background
Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar. For people with type 1 diabetes, hyperglycemia caused by insufficient insulin can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a very serious situation that requires emergency medical treatment. Hyperglycemia can also be caused by eating too much food, which requires treatment to lower blood sugar levels but which does not lead to DKA. The only way to determine between the two situations is through ketone testing.
Causes of Hyperglycemia
Eating too much food relative to the amount of insulin injected
Missing an insulin injection
Blockage in insulin pump tubing
Disconnected insulin pump infusion set
Illness or stress
Symptoms of Hyperglycemia
Frequent urination
Frequent thirst
Blurry vision
Dry mouth
Fatigue
Testing for Ketones
There are two ways to test for ketones: urine testing and blood testing. Just as blood glucose testing proved to be superior to urine glucose testing, so too is blood ketone testing proving to be better than urine ketone testing. Ketones appear first in the blood, then in the urine after being filtered by the kidneys. Thus the body has been producing ketones for a while before you can detect them in the urine. Children with Diabetes Highly Recommends blood ketone testing over urine ketone testing.
Since ketones in the blood can be detected well before ketones in the urine, there is the possibility to treat sooner than you would if you waited for urine testing to show a positive result. Blood ketone testing can be easier for parents who have very young children with diabetes who do not always have the ability to urina Continue reading

Meal Planning Tips for People with Type 2 Diabetes

Meal Planning Tips for People with Type 2 Diabetes

Putting It All Together
If you have diabetes, SparkPeople highly recommends that you work directly with a Registered Dietitian or Certified Diabetes Educator to receive comprehensive training in diabetes self-management. Together you can develop a diabetes meal plan based on your health goals, tastes, and lifestyle—as well as the latest guidelines for healthy eating. Below are examples of two different meal planning systems; your registered dietitian can help you decide which is best for you.
1. Carbohydrate Counting is the most accurate meal planning system for controlling blood sugar levels. Essentially, carbohydrate counting is a way to “budget” the amount of carbohydrate eaten at any meal or snack. This method allows you to choose any type of carbohydrate foods, as long as the portion size you choose allows you stay within your goal “budget.” In general, about half of your daily calories should come from carbohydrate foods. However, if you have diabetes, it is important to eat roughly the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. Commonly recommended “budgets” are 30 to 45 grams (2 to 3 servings) of carbohydrate per meal for women and 45 to 60 grams (3-4 servings) per meal for men. Both women and men should limit snacks to 15 to 30 grams (1 to 2 servings) of carbohydrates. (Click here for a printable reference chart of carbohydrate servings.) Your Registered Dietitian will determine the right amount of carbohydrates for you, along with guidelines for protein and fat intake.
In addition to carbohydrate budgeting, it is important to space your meals and snac Continue reading

Are ketones dangerous?

Are ketones dangerous?

Are ketones dangerous? The answer to that question is it depends. I think it’s important to note that ketones still may pose a risk for those of us on a ketogenic diet, pursuing nutritional ketosis. I have blogged a lot over the years about the benefits of a ketogenic (low carb, high fat) diet for type 1 diabetes. I even wrote an eBook about it. I began my dietary experimentation after 15 years of living with diabetes so my discussion of this topic often assumes that readers are also aware of their own limits and responsibility to establish their limits before inviting complex experimentation. As exciting as the results of a ketogenic diet are, risks must be understood in order to proceed safely.
Ketones can indicate diabetic keto-acidosis or DKA, which is life-threatening insulin deficiency, for someone with type 1 diabetes. Sadly, far too many people with type 1 diabetes die from DKA every year. Although the risk is pretty low on an annual basis, there are large numbers of people who actually die from DKA. So, you can easily see why the medical system believes that ketones (or the condition it is associated with) can absolutely can be dangerous.We all enter into experimentation with ketosis having had the “ketones are dangerous” doctrine drilled into our heads from the time of diagnosis. When you have type 1 diabetes, assuming a standard carbohydrate driven diet, the appearance of ketones in any concentration suggests DKA (diabetic keto acidosis) which is life threatening! DKA occurs as a result of insulin deficiency and correlates with elevated blood glucose. In re Continue reading

Carbohydrate Restriction

Carbohydrate Restriction

An Option for Diabetes Management
As diabetes becomes more prevalent, there are also an increasing number of books and websites devoted to diets that claim to control it. Typing “eating for diabetes” into the “Books” section of Amazon’s search engine will retrieve more than 1,000 results. Just as there is more than one way to lose weight, there are multiple eating plans to manage diabetes. Of the many options, low-carbohydrate diets have been around the longest, and over the years considerable research has demonstrated their effectiveness in controlling blood glucose levels. However, they are still controversial.
Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, doctors tried numerous types of diets, including diets with less than 10 grams of carbohydrate per day, to try to manage blood glucose levels in their patients with diabetes. For people with milder diabetes (the terms Type 1 and Type 2 were not yet used), a diet that was very low in carbohydrate and high in fat and calories could result in reasonably good health, sometimes for many years. But this diet was not helpful for people (particularly children) with severe diabetes. For them, it was found that cutting back severely on all food kept them alive longer, but their quality of life was low due to constant hunger and emaciation. Once injectable insulin was available, carbohydrate — and food generally — could be consumed in greater amounts.
Over the years, recommendations from various health organizations have called for consuming a larger percentage of daily intake from carbohydrate based on research suggestin Continue reading

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