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Benefits Of A Vegetarian Diet For Managing Diabetes, Recipe Included

Benefits of A Vegetarian Diet For Managing Diabetes, Recipe Included

Benefits of A Vegetarian Diet For Managing Diabetes, Recipe Included

Though it is not likely to cure your diabetes, eating a vegetarian diet may help control some of the symptoms, stave off diabetes-related complications, and possibly make the body more insulin-responsive.
The benefits depend on the type of vegetarian diet adopted. A vegetarian who allows dairy products will experience different results than a vegan, a person who eliminates all animal products from his or her diet.
Even if you do not choose a vegetarian lifestyle, you can enjoy some of its perks by preparing veggie meals a few times each month.
Three Vegetarian Diet Benefits
Controlling blood glucose. Foods prominent in vegetarian diets – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes – help the body control blood glucose and become more responsive to insulin. This reduces the risk of complications related to diabetes and may lower the amount of medication you require. However, diabetic vegetarians need to monitor their intake of simple carbohydrates or starches, which can quickly elevate blood sugar.
Managing weight. Vegetarian diets tend to be lower in calories than non-vegetarian diets, making weight management an easier task. Vegans, who eat no meat or meat-related products, also have lower body mass indexes (BMIs) than most of us. Having a healthy body weight and BMI aids in blood glucose management, lowers the risk of diabetes-related complications, and facilitates overall well-being.
Maintaining a healthy heart. Enjoying a low-fat vegetarian diet will decrease your risk for developing cardiovascular disease, a complication that often accompanies diabetes. Thou Continue reading

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The CDC's

The CDC's "Diabetes" Data Needs to be Segmented by Diabetes Type

This year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released data on the state of "diabetes" in the United States. The CDC allows you to see the data by gender, ethnicity, age etc...but fails to break down the diagnoses by type. Presenting aggregated data of all diabetes types together makes it impossible to interpret the data meaningfully for any one type of diabetes.
In order to segment the data, it needs to be collected differently. Until research and reporting protocols are changed, the data will fail to adequately serve its purpose. Our request is simple: the CDC needs to release data segmented by diabetes type.
There is continued public confusion over what the differences are between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It is important that the CDC not further this confusion with unspecific data, and even more critical that those who rely on the data have accurate information. This data is relied upon by people all over the world - including researchers, journalists, and students. It needs to be accurate.
You can help in a few ways:
1. Sign and share this pledge. Join us in educating the global community about this chronic disease and fighting for a cure!
2. Use Aidbox, which adds a image to your email signature, helping you to raise money and awareness with every email you send. Easy, effective and free.
________
Beyond Type 1 was founded in 2015 by Juliet de Baubigny, Nick Jonas, Sarah Lucas and Sam Talbot. A new brand of philanthropy leveraging the power of social media and technology, Beyond Type 1 is changing what it means to live with Type 1 diabetes. By educ Continue reading

New Self-Administering ‘Smart’ Insulin Could Revolutionise Diabetes Treatment

New Self-Administering ‘Smart’ Insulin Could Revolutionise Diabetes Treatment

This new form of ‘smart’ insulin remains in the blood stream for 24 hours, and maintains blood sugar levels on its own. Which means no more finger pricks or insulin pens.
Researchers in the US have developed a new type of insulin that’s injected once a day into the blood-stream, and then is automatically activated only when a person’s blood sugar levels are high enough. This means a type 1 diabetes patient doesn’t need to worry about keep tabs on their condition throughout the day, because the ‘smart’ insulin has got it covered.
The new compound, called Ins-PBA-F, was developed by researchers at the University of Utah and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and has so far shown very positive outcomes in diabetic mice. The team was able to ensure that it remained in the blood stream for 24 hours by adding a molecule known as an aliphatic domain, which is made up of a long chain of fatty acids that dangle from the insulin molecule. This chain, the researchers think, links to a blood protein called albumin, which allows the insulin to be stored safely, without the risk of it accidentally linking to other sugar molecules in the blood.
And there it sits, until blood sugar levels hit a critical threshold, which causes it to be released so it can lower the amount of glucose back to safe levels. The team also added a chemical called PBA (Phenylboronic Acid) to their new insulin, which can not only attach to glucose molecules, but also detach again once the job is done.
Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, the researc Continue reading

Diabetes Diet: Why Cucumbers Belong In Your Shopping Cart

Diabetes Diet: Why Cucumbers Belong In Your Shopping Cart

Cucumbers have a veggie flavor that is nearly not there.
“A cucumber is “...about as close to neutrality as a vegetable can get without ceasing to exist,” wrote food journalist, Waverley Root.
On top of it’s taste neutrality, cucumbers are not even a veggie. Cucumbers develop from the plant’s flower and contain the plant’s seeds, making this culinary-veggie a fruit.
5 Reasons To Shop For Cucumbers
Identity crisis aside, when it comes to health benefits cucumbers are hardly neutral. They are a highly beneficial addition to diabetes meal plans for several reasons.
Reduce Inflammation. Many chronic diseases including obesity, diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and heart disease have been associated with increased systemic inflammation. Cucumbers help “cool” the body’s inflammatory responses.
Stress Management. Because cucumbers contain a slew of B vitamins including B1, B5, and B7 (biotin), they help calm our tension and anxiety. The B vitamins may also guard against stress's harmful effects.
Support Good Digestive Health. We all need plenty of water and fiber for good digestion, and cucumbers are loaded with both. The fiber in cucumber skin is the insoluble variety that helps food move through the digestive tract more efficiently, and aids elimination.
Support Cardiovascular Health. Nerve signals, muscle contractions, and healthy heart function require concentrations of potassium in and outside our cells. Cucumbers are a good source of potassium.
Help With Weight Control. An entire cup of sliced cucumber is only 16 calories, making it a great snack. Plus, the Continue reading

Chemical Found In Ayahuasca May Be Able To Completely Reverse Diabetes

Chemical Found In Ayahuasca May Be Able To Completely Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes currently affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. In America alone, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that number to be approximately 20 million. Potential cures and methods to reverse the disease are showing some promising results, and one of them is a chemical that’s commonly found in a number of plants around the world. It’s also a main ingredient in the psychoactive mixture commonly known as ayahuasca.
Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that prevents a person’s pancreas from producing insulin, which is a hormone that enables people to receive energy from their food. This occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, which are called beta cells. Apparently, the cause is not well understood, but scientists believe that genetic and environmental factors play a role. Modern day mainstream science tells us that there are no cures.
Again, types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both ultimately result from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells, which is where this chemical is showing the most promising results.
New research published in the journal Nature Medicine – a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, funded by JDRF and the National Institutes of Health – found that:
“Using three different mouse and human islet in vivo–based models, we show that harmine is able to induce beta cell proliferation, increase islet mass and improve glycemic control. These observations sugg Continue reading

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