diabetestalk.net

Association Between Consumption Of Dairy Products And Incident Type 2 Diabetesinsights From The European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer Study

Association between consumption of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetesinsights from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study

Association between consumption of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetesinsights from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study


Association between consumption of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetesinsights from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study
We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in.
The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders.
Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient.
Association between consumption of dairy products and incident type 2 diabetesinsights from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer study
The public health burden of type 2 diabetes has risen unabated over the past decades, fueled by obesity and lifestyle influences, including diet quality. Epidemiological evidence is accumulating for an inverse association between dairy product intake and type 2 diabetes risk; this is somewhat counterintuitive to the saturated fat and cardiometabolic disease paradigm. The present report reviews the contribution that the findings of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) study have made to this debate, noting that types of dairy products, particularly fermented dairy products including yogurt, may be more relevant than overall dairy intake for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. The EPIC study has contributed evidence through complementary approaches of a large prospective study across 8 European countries with heterogeneous di Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Standardized Diabetes Care Empowers Patients

Standardized Diabetes Care Empowers Patients


Diabetes is the most common life-threatening, chronic illness in children who live in developed countries.1 With effective management of diabetes, children with diabetes can live long, healthy, and active lives. Following evidence-based guidelines such as the routine screenings recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) helps patients manage their diabetes and avoid further complications.
Texas Childrens Hospital, the nations largest pediatric hospital and ranked one of the top four Best Childrens Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report, believes that diabetes patients and their families are most successful in managing their disease if they receive standardized, family-centered, multidisciplinary care in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Like other leading childrens hospitals, Texas Childrens had the best intentions of adhering to the guidelines. However, team members were concerned that not all patients were receiving the ADA-recommended testsand baseline data confirmed they were falling short. While clinicians were aware of the evidence-based guidelines, they lacked the support of data and technology that would help them keep track of every patient and their status in relation to the guidelines. Clinicians were also concerned that variation in care and gaps in communication were negatively impacting patient satisfaction and empowerment.
To tackle this multi-faceted problem, Texas Childrens created a new Clinic Care Process Team (CPT). The team developed a comprehensive approach to standardizing diabetes care by automating best practice alerts that help Continue reading

Glibenclamide and metfoRmin versus stAndard care in gEstational diabeteS (GRACES): a feasibility open label randomised trial

Glibenclamide and metfoRmin versus stAndard care in gEstational diabeteS (GRACES): a feasibility open label randomised trial


Metformin is widely used to treat gestational diabetes (GDM), but many women remain hyperglycaemic and require additional therapy. We aimed to determine recruitment rate and participant throughput in a randomised trial of glibenclamide compared with standard therapy insulin (added to maximum tolerated metformin) for treatment of GDM.
We conducted an open label feasibility study in 5 UK antenatal clinics among pregnant women 16 to 36weeks gestation with metformin-treated GDM. Women failing to achieve adequate glycaemic control on metformin monotherapy were randomised to additional glibenclamide or insulin. The primary outcome was recruitment rate. We explored feasibility with uptake, retention, adherence, safety, glycaemic control, participant satisfaction and clinical outcomes.
Records of 197 women were screened and 23 women randomised to metformin and glibenclamide (n=13) or metformin and insulin (n=10). Mean (SD) recruitment rate was 0.39 (0.62) women/centre/month. 9/13 (69.2%, 95%CI 38.690.9%) women adhered to glibenclamide and all provided outcome data (100% retention). There were no episodes of severe hypoglycaemia, but metformin and insulin gave superior glycaemic control to metformin and glibenclamide, with fewer blood glucose readings <3.5mmol/l (median [IQR] difference/woman/week of treatment 0.58 [0.031.87]).
A large randomised controlled trial comparing glibenclamide or insulin in combination with metformin for women with GDM would be feasible but is unlikely to be worthwhile, given the poorer glycaemic control with glibenclamide and metformin in this pilot Continue reading

Health literacy in diabetes care: explanation, evidence and equipment

Health literacy in diabetes care: explanation, evidence and equipment


Health literacy in diabetes care: explanation, evidence and equipment
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North S-3223, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North S-3223, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
Kerri L Cavanaugh: [email protected]
See other articles in PMC that cite the published article.
The exchange of complex health information among patients, providers, health organizations and the public is often described as health literacy. Low levels of health literacy is common and associated with processes of healthcare and important health outcomes. In diabetes, health literacy is related to diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy and self-care behaviors and glycemic control. Health literacy may also provide a better understanding of racial disparities observed in patients with diabetes. Strategies to address health literacy, based upon this understanding of its role, provide a means to improve diabetes care. This article describes the concept of health literacy and its assessment and the evidence of its impact on patients with diabetes, and offers suggested methods and tools that may be implemented to improve clinical care.
In 2010, it was estimated that there were 285 million adults worldwide with diabetes, with projections that this will increase to nearly 440 million people by 2030 [ 1 ]. Despite innovative scientific discoveries to advance our understanding of Continue reading

How to Help Seniors and Caregivers Manage Diabetes at Home

How to Help Seniors and Caregivers Manage Diabetes at Home


As the rate of diabetes in American adults over age 65 continues to rise, senior care professionals can play a significant role in helping these older adults and their family caregivers manage the condition at home. According to the CDC, nearly 12 million seniors have been diagnosed with diabetes, and the rate of the condition among people between the ages of 65 and 74 rose 113 percent between 1993 and 2014. These numbers suggest that diabetes will continue to be a serious health issue among older adults for years to come.
Diabetes increases a seniors risk of developing several other comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and kidney failure. In a recent webinar co-sponsored by the American Society on Aging and Home Instead, Inc., gerontologist Lakelyn Hogan and registered nurse Lanita Knoke discussed several ways senior care professionals can help clients manage their diabetes for improved wellness and quality of life. They also talked about tactful ways healthcare professionals can address the diabetes elephant in the room: obesity.
To provide support for seniors with diabetes and their caregivers, you might consider these four strategies.
1. Provide education as a means of empowerment
Diabetes management can feel like a complex, overwhelming thing, especially for an older adult who may have multiple comorbid conditions. You can help seniors and caregivers feel more confident and empowered to take on the task of diabetes management by arming them with key information, such as:
How to recognize the signs and symptoms of diabetes, hypoglycemia and hyperglycem Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles