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Ask.Screen.Know: A Chat With Rev Run And Justine Simmons About Diabetes And How Black Families Can Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle

Ask.Screen.Know: A Chat With Rev Run And Justine Simmons About Diabetes And How Black Families Can Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle

Ask.Screen.Know: A Chat With Rev Run And Justine Simmons About Diabetes And How Black Families Can Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle


Ask.Screen.Know: A Chat With Rev Run And Justine Simmons About Diabetes And How Black Families Can Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle
We spend a virtual visit at Run's House and learn how his family are staying healthy!
Diabetes has always been a scary word for me. Growing up, the phrase diabetes runs in our family was drilled into my head over and over again, whilst watching my aunt inject herself with insulin on a strict scheduled basis.
As I got olderand being a stan for carbs and sweetsI always tried my best to keep an eye on it, knowing fully well just how more difficult my life would become, should I inherit this medical condition.
Thats why I was thrilled to chat with Rev Run and Justine Simmons, who are partnering up with Novo Nordisk for the Ask.Screen.Know campaign, on a mission to raise awareness about the risks of Type 2 diabetes and the importance of early screening. According to the American Diabetes Association , more than 30 million Americans are living with diabetes and one in four dont know it. African Americans are almost twice as likely to develop diabetes as Caucasian Americans.
In addition to discussing how to reduce the risk, we talked about ways to manage once you are diagnosed. Because Rev Run and Justine are all about family, we got to get a virtual peek into Runs House and how their family is about that healthy lifestyle.
Blavity: Were very excited to talk to you about the Ask.Screen.Know campaign because its a very important topic. What is your personal connection with diabetes?
Rev Run: My dad had diabetes and my wife, Justines dad, had dia Continue reading

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Diabetes Week: Know Type1 and Save Lives

Diabetes Week: Know Type1 and Save Lives

My first blog post in a while… I’m so sorry, life has been absolutely bonkers and totally different to how I thought this year would play out! A large chunk of my life has been taken up by work after I was promoted in January from a part time Marketing Assistant to a full time position. I also finally managed to pass my driving test late March and I bought my first ever car, it’s PINK! Well kind of, it changes colour depending on the light, it might be pink today but tomorrow it could be more purple or red! So every spare minute I get away from work has been spent adventuring with Cici, cruising in our car. Wanderlust is my new favourite word!
I’m also busy packing, because my biggest wish for this year has come true… Cici and I are finally moving house! It’s currently being renovated by our new landlord, so we have some time to wait until we can move in yet, but we have a potential moving in date of August 1st. Hopefully we’ll get some warm weather by then and we can make the most of our gorgeous new garden before the colder months kick in.
Anyway, enough about that, let’s talk about the now! I attended my first ever Diabetes UK Type 1 event this week at The Senedd in Cardiff, (when I finally got there, late as usual… bloody sat nav!) and I had a fab time! I got to finally put some real life faces to names of fellow Type 1 Diabetics I’ve met through my blog. Arriving late, I expected that I’d have to walk into a packed out room, all flustered and red faced with embarrassment as everyone stared disapprovingly at me. Instead, I arrived to find David & R Continue reading

Diabetes Tied to Greater Death Risk in China

Diabetes Tied to Greater Death Risk in China

Diabetes was linked to a rise in all-cause and cause-specific mortality among a Chinese population, researchers stated.
The nationwide study of people in rural and urban areas of China reported a significant association between diabetes and all-cause mortality compared to those without diabetes (1,373 versus 646 deaths/100,000 adjusted rate ratio 2.00, 95% CI 1.93-2.08), which resulted in an average of 9-year shorter lifespan, according to Fiona Bragg, DPhil, of the University of Oxford in England, and colleagues.
Although prevalence rates of diabetes were higher among urban areas of China, mortality rates were higher in rural areas (rural RR 2.17, 95% CI 2.07-2.29), they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
The authors also found a link between an increased risk for several cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular cause-specific mortalities associated with diabetes.
China, which has one of the highest rates of diabetes in the world with an estimated 110 million individuals affected, has experienced a rapid increase in diabetes prevalence over the past few decades, explained Bragg in an interview with MedPage Today.
"Because the increase in diabetes prevalence in China is recent, the full effect on mortality is unknown. Most previous studies looking at the impact of diabetes on mortality have been in high-income countries where diabetes is generally relatively well managed. It is not clear that the findings of these studies can be applied to China, where there are important differences in diabetes and its management compared with the West," she stated.
Usi Continue reading

New Diabetes Technology: Fact and Fantasy

New Diabetes Technology: Fact and Fantasy


Home / Resources / Articles / New Diabetes Technology: Fact and Fantasy
New Diabetes Technology: Fact and Fantasy
Guest Post by David Kliff, Diabetic Investor
Diabetes technology is evolving in a very exciting way, said Jeff Dachis, CEO and Founder of One Drop. But not surprisingly for the vast majority of people with diabetes worldwide, expensive sensors, automated insulin delivery solutions, or call center approaches to care can create barriers and challenges to effective disease management. This statement came from a MannKind press release announcing a new clinical trial.
Appropriate people with type 2 diabetes who meet inclusion criteria will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Afrezza with One Drop | Premium or One Drop | Premium alone. Changes in hemoglobin A1C, quality of life, self-care, treatment satisfaction, and other metrics will be assessed.
Now before we get into whats really going on here I have a few quick thoughts about this trial. First, it is refreshing to see One Drop participate in a real randomized controlled clinical trial, as they have tended to use self-reported data to prove their system works. Two, I suspect that when this trial is over both groups will show various levels of improvements in HbA1c. As I keep saying Afrezza does work; this has never been in dispute. The problems with Afrezza have nothing to do with whether it works. Third, the results of this trial will do nothing to change the fortunes of MannKind or One Drop.
What I found interesting was Mr. Dachis choice of words, as he has drawn a line in the sand. Expensive Continue reading

Pharmacology and therapeutic implications of current drugs for type 2 diabetes mellitus

Pharmacology and therapeutic implications of current drugs for type 2 diabetes mellitus


Pharmacology and therapeutic implications of current drugs for type 2 diabetes mellitus
Abd Tahrani is a UK National Institute for Health Research Clinician Scientist and Honorary Consultant Physician at the University of Birmingham and Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. He has undertaken research into the pathogenesis of diabetes-related microvascular complications, the pathogenesis and management of obesity, the metabolic consequences of sleep-related disorders and the pharmacology of diabetes.
Anthony Barnett is Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Honorary Consultant Physician at the University of Birmingham and Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. He has undertaken extensive research into the genetics and pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated complications, along with Health Service-related research in ethnic minority groups and the development and use of glucose-lowering therapies. He has been a regular adviser to both the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the European Medicines Agency.
Clifford Bailey is Professor of Clinical Science at Aston University, Birmingham, UK, and has undertaken extensive research on the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the development of glucose-lowering therapies. He is an editor of Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research, and has served as an expert witness to medicines regulatory agencies.
Nature Reviews Endocrinology volume 12, pages 566592 (2016)
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global epidemic that poses a major challenge to Continue reading

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