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Are You ‘skinny Fat’?

Are you ‘skinny fat’?

Are you ‘skinny fat’?

The common wisdom is that if you’re overweight you're unhealthy, and if you’re thin, you're healthy. New research says otherwise.
On the outside, you’re an average Joe with a normal build and a pant size that’s readily available. But on the inside – it’s a different story.
The term "skinny fat” is a phrase used to describe people who look fit and healthy on the surface yet, due to a lack of exercise or poor diet, have a slew of health problems brewing beneath it.
One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found nearly one in four skinny people have pre-diabetes and are “metabolically obese.” In other words, are skinny fat.
Here’s the thing: diabetes is the fastest-growing chronic health problem plaguing Aussies, yet many of us wouldn’t know how to spot if we were at risk of the deadly disease.
One Australian is diagnosed with diabetes every five minutes. Of those, 85-95 per cent will be diagnosed with type 2, a condition that’s both deadly and preventable.
Sof Andrikopoulos, CEO of the Australian Diabetes Society, describes type 1 and type 2 diabetes as diseases of the pancreas, in which the pancreas is unable to secrete enough insulin to regulate the glucose levels in our blood.
“With type 1, the immune system actually kills the cells that produce insulin so there’s a complete deficiency. With type 2, the insulin-producing cells don’t work efficiently so there’s a relative deficiency.”
Type 2 used to typically affect men and women who were over 55. That’s all changed now, Andrikopoulos says: “When I started Continue reading

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6 Simple Diet Changes That Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

6 Simple Diet Changes That Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Each of these eating strategies is backed up by research.
If current trends continue, one in three adults in the United States could have diabetes by 2050, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s a scary statistic. But luckily we do know a thing or two about how to avoid the disease. And the preventative measures are actually pretty straightforward, doable, and sustainable. Here, I've rounded up six research-backed eating strategies that will help you ward off type 2 diabetes. Combine them with an active lifestyle, and you’ll be well on your way to remaining diabetes-free.
Eat breakfast (seriously)
You've heard it time and again, and it's true. Breakfast really is the most important meal of the day. Here's another reason to fuel up in the a.m.: A meta-analysis published in Public Health Nutrition that involved more than 100,000 participants found that people who skipped breakfast had a 15% to 21% increased risk of getting a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, compared to individuals who ate breakfast regularly.
RELATED: How to Build a Healthy Meal That Actually Keeps You Full
Of course, not all morning meals are created equal. To best manage your weight, regulate your blood glucose and insulin levels, and get the right mix of nutrients, I advise eating a balanced breakfast that contains there five components: vegetables, lean protein, good fat, a small portion of healthy carbs, and herbs and spices. That could mean throwing together a veggie, herb, and avocado omelet, paired with fresh fruit, for example. Or you could whip up a smoothie made with Continue reading

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

“Oh, you have diabetes? That’s where you can’t eat sugar and have to poke yourself with needles and stuff because you ate too much candy as a kid…right?”
*sigh*
Wrong.
Most people have no clue what diabetes is let alone that there is more than one type of diabetes. Type 1, type 2, LADA, MODY, and gestational are just some classification examples of diabetes. All have a range of differences and similarities but the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
As type 1 and type 2 diabetics [should] know, there are a few major differences between the two conditions which, all too often, get confused and misconstrued by the public. Yet, there are also a few similarities that get overlooked even among people in the diabetic community.
Take a look at these two major forms of diabetes and make sure you can not only distinguish the differences but also share the similarities.
Similarities
Symptoms
The symptoms for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are identical in most ways. Both conditions involve three distinct symptoms prior to diagnosis:
Polyuria – excessive urination often due to high blood sugar
Polydipsia – excessive thirst
Polyphagia – excessive hunger
In type 2 diabetes, symptoms tend to be more gradual than type 1 but they both still share these symptoms along with the other usual byproducts of diabetes like high and low blood sugar, increased agitation, shaky/sweaty blood sugar reactions, as well as the more severe hypoglycemic events that can lead to seizures, coma, and death.
Complications
People often ask “so, do you have the bad kin Continue reading

Diet ‘reverses diabetes in just 10 weeks’, claims new study

Diet ‘reverses diabetes in just 10 weeks’, claims new study

The research, the first of its kind, could pave the way for an overhaul in the management of the condition which is linked to obesity and affects almost three million people in the UK.
Most diabetics are advised to eat a balanced diet, including carbohydrates.
However, scientists, who carried out the study on 238 patients, found that restricting carbohydrates and increasing fat led to dramatic improvements.
Half the patients saw their condition reversed after just 10 weeks and were able to reduce or stop taking diabetes drugs.
This is the first time we have seen such a drastic change in such a large group of people outside bariatric [weight loss] surgery
Eighty nine per cent of those in the study, who had been reliant on insulin due to the severity of their disease, were able to dramatically reduce or stop taking it.
Professor Sarah Hallberg, an expert in obesity medicine, who led the study at Indiana University, said: “This is the first time we have seen such a drastic change in such a large group of people outside bariatric [weight loss] surgery.
“It is something we would never previously have known was possible. I was so blown over by the results and we should now think about using this approach as a standard of care as it outperforms current treatment.”
Fri, August 19, 2016
Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition.
She added: “Diabetes is a state of carbohydrate toxicity. Insulin resistance is a state of carbohydrate intol Continue reading

Best snacks for people with type 2 diabetes

Best snacks for people with type 2 diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms.
Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure.
Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks.
Foods high in protein
High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms.
Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include:
roasted chickpeas
apples or celery with almond butter
almonds, walnuts, or pistachios
trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients
hard-boiled eggs
plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt
low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit
diced avocado and cherry tomatoes
snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus
Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory.
For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack.
High-fiber snacks
Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as Continue reading

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