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Are You Having Symptoms Of Pre-Diabetes?

Are You Having Symptoms Of Pre-Diabetes?

Are You Having Symptoms Of Pre-Diabetes?

The advancements in medical science and technology have had great successes in finding easy cures as well as completely getting rid of some of the diseases which were considered deadly and fatal in the previous centuries.
You can take a look at the comparison between cases of tuberculosis, its life expectancy, and advanced treatment in the past twentieth century and current times. The cases have not only gone down to a big extent but most of the diagnosed have been treated successfully.
You can actually have many treatment options available for a certain health condition depending on the current state, severity, and your choice. However, looking at the current health concerns and statistics, countries are now facing even worse issues.
The previously considered health concerns have now been replaced with others. Coronary heart diseases, COPD, cancer, and diabetes have been listed as the most common causes of death in the United States and rest of the world.
One thing you should note about these diseases is that they are interlinked many times. A person with coronary heart diseases is likely to have hypertension and fluctuating blood sugar levels leading to a diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes.
Diabetes has been becoming a huge issue in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Diabetes Statistics report, 37% percent of the population in the US over the age of 18 and 51% of adults over the age of 50 have diabetes symptoms.
In addition, the latest report suggests that there are around 86 million adults solely in the United S Continue reading

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The Apple Watch could one day help monitor diabetes

The Apple Watch could one day help monitor diabetes

Apple apparently has a team working on technology that would enable blood sugar to be monitored by a wearable device. The team – and any progress they've made – are currently top-secret, but as it’s wearable tech it’s safe to assume the device will be an Apple Watch or something similar if the project comes to fruition.
The tech giant isn’t by any means the first company to try its hand at this technology, but hearing about actual progress from a big player is exciting.
If Apple manages to get the technology to work it could be revolutionary for diabetes sufferers, who currently have to go through a convoluted and invasive process every time they want to check their blood sugar.
Currently measuring blood sugar requires piercing the skin, applying a small amount of blood to a test strip, then inserting the strip into a blood glucose monitoring device. The process is unpleasant and time-consuming, and the need for a constant supply of strips can become an expensive proposition.
By contrast, this development would work using optical sensors to shine a light through the skin to test for sugar levels in the blood. If it works, it would be a revolutionary development, although not an inexpensive one for Apple.
A costly enterprise
The executive chairman of industry-leading glucose-monitoring company DexCom, Terrance Gregg, has previously said that to succeed in this field would cost a company “several hundred million dollars or even a billion dollars”.
It would be worth it though, with a recent study at the University of London estimating that the global cost of diab Continue reading

What You Need To Know About Diabetes

What You Need To Know About Diabetes

Across the globe, the rate of diabetes has skyrocketed — quadrupled, in fact — in the last few decades. As of 2012, over 9% of the U.S. population has diabetes — and more than 8.1 million people who have it don't know it, according to the American Diabetes Association. We spoke with Dorothy Fink, MD, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Medical Center, to find out what you need to know about the condition, including its main warning signs.
What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes?
To understand the two diseases, you have to first understand what's supposed to happen. After eating — if you're healthy — your digestive system will break down food into basic sugars (a.k.a. glucose) that it can use as fuel. In order for it to do that, though, your pancreas has to release the hormone insulin, which acts like a key for each of your cells, unlocking them so the glucose can enter and be used for fuel. But in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, there is a kink in this system.
Dr. Fink explains that type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune response, which means that antibodies from a patient's own immune system start to attack the pancreas, damaging it and preventing it from producing insulin. Without the insulin, the body's cells can't use the glucose, so it builds up in the blood, causing the "high blood sugar" that can be dangerous. People with type 1 usually have to rely on insulin injections to make sure their bodies can regulate their blood sugar and their cells get the fuel they need.
Patients with type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, can still make insulin Continue reading

Continuous Versus Flash Glucose Monitoring To Reduce Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes

Continuous Versus Flash Glucose Monitoring To Reduce Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes

Continuous glucose monitoring may reduce hypoglycemia fear.
The Dexcom G5 system was approved by the FDA in 2016 and was later permitted for use to replace finger-stick testing to determine insulin dose. The REPLACE-BG study proved its safety and effectiveness in adults with well-controlled type 1 diabetes at low risk for severe hypoglycemia. The FreeStyle Libre Pro System was also approved last year by the US FDA for use by physicians for monitoring glucose in patients with diabetes. It is the third “blinded” professional CGM system on the US market, joining the Dexcom G4 Platinum Professional Real-Time CGM and the Medtronic iPro2 Professional CGM, but it does not require finger-stick calibration, has no reusable components requiring disinfection, provides a longer period of data capture (14 days, compared with 7 for the Dexcom and 3 for Medtronic), and has a lower cost.
Previously studies revealed that CGMs could increase the time spent in and above glucose target range along with reduction in time below that same range in type 1 diabetes. Almost one-fourth of the adult patients had experienced reduction in awareness of hypoglycemia putting them at high-risk for severe hypoglycemia. In a recent UK study, real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has shown significant improvement in identifying and reducing the time spent in hypoglycemia in comparison to the flash glucose monitoring (FGM) in type 1 diabetes patients with impaired hypoglycemia awareness. According to Dr. Monika Reddy, the study showed that both CGM and FGM devices: G5 by Dexcom and Freestyle Libre b Continue reading

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet – Expert’s Panel

Diabetes management can be efficiently done by following the right diet, being active, getting enough sleep, perhaps, in some cases, taking medication as prescribed by your doctor. So many factors have to be taken into consideration when it comes to regulating your blood sugar levels in order to avoid the lows and the highs.
It is recommended by experts that one keep their blood sugars in control by diet, as in, eating healthy. For that, you have to make some healthy choices.
But with so many internet articles and blogs about diabetes and eating healthy out there, who do you listen to? Who should you trust? What do you eat? What should you avoid? One small mistake and you can pay with your life, in some cases.
We have compiled tips and suggestions from 29 respected experts who share with you their rules on how you can control your type 2 with diet. Read on to find out what they are.
1. Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, M.Ed
I encourage my clients with Type 2 Diabetes to do the following: stop dieting and labeling foods “good” or “bad” and, instead, think of them as having high or low health benefits. The diet mentality only promotes rebound eating. The goal is to develop an internal, rather than an external, locus of control. I also encourage them to learn how to become “normal” or intuitive eaters by connecting to appetite cues for hunger, fullness and satisfaction, and eating with awareness, which often means without distractions.
They also need to develop effective practices to manage stress and distress without turning to food. All this can be done with an eating disor Continue reading

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