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Are Apples Good For Diabetics?

Are Apples Good for Diabetics?

Are Apples Good for Diabetics?


Apples may help mitigate the risk of complications related to diabetes
Apples have all the vital nutrients and antioxidants
Apples and all other fruits are widely known as part of a healthy diet. But for a diabetic, choosing a fruit is not that simple as you may be concerned with its impact on blood sugar levels . Many fruits have natural sugars considered as carbohydrates. If you are counting carbs, be sure to consider how much you are consuming.
Like other fruits, apples also have natural sugar which is transformed into glucose. But eating too much carbohydrate can cause high blood sugar levels. According to American Diabetes Association (ADA), high fiber apples should be added in a diabetic meal plan as long as they work in your target of carbohydrate intake.
The popular saying an apple a day keeps the doctor away is made for a good reason. Apple is rich in vitamin C and fiber. These nutrients are found mostly in the fruits skin. Make sure not to leave that part. Apples are also rich in small amounts of calcium, vitamin A and iron.
Since they are rich in fiber, consistent consumption of apple may lead to promote your digestion system and to keep waste flushing out of the body. Fresh apples are cholesterol -free, fat-free, rich in fiber, and are sodium-free. Apples also have polyphenols and other natural antioxidants. These are found in both meat and skin of the apple. So, you are not going to miss them. These antioxidants are very vital for your body as they can help
Must Read: Is Avocado Good or Bad for Diabetics?
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Get Well Wednesday: Diabetes 101

Get Well Wednesday: Diabetes 101


ARE AFRICAN-AMERICANS AT A HIGHER RISK OF DEVELOPING DIABETES? IF SO, IS IT MORE HEREDITARY OR DIET AND LIFESTYLE?
Yes, African-Americans have twice the risk of developing diabetes as white Americans. This is more likely attributed to diet and lifestyle factors. There is a higher rate of obesity in the African-American community and there is a direct link between obesity and diabetes.
Diet and exercise plays a key role in preventing and managing the onset of diabetes. Adopting a healthy lifestyle with daily activity and diets with food lower in fat and calories and higher in fiber as well as fruits, vegetables and whole grains is very important.
HOW LIKELY IS IT THAT A CHILD WILL DEVELOP DIABETES IF PARENT HAS IT?
Though there is a genetic component to developing diabetes, if a parent has diabetes, it does not necessarily mean a child will have it as well.
WHATS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 DIABETES?
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does produce insulin but it cannot effectively use it.
Type 1 is an autoimmune disease where the bodys immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, so therefore the body cannot produce the insulin it needs to absorb the glucose (sugar) out of the blood and bring it into the cells where it needs energy. Type 1 usually occurs early on in childhood. The exact cause is not known but it is probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active.
Type 2 disease Continue reading

Regular alcohol drinkers have lower risk of diabetes, according to a huge new study

Regular alcohol drinkers have lower risk of diabetes, according to a huge new study

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There's a new checkmark in the 'drinking isn't all bad for you' column.
According to a new study that looked at more than 70,000 Danish people, those who drink small to moderate amounts of alcohol on a frequent basis are less likely to develop diabetes than people who don't drink at all.
To be clear, these results shouldn't be seen as license or encouragement to drink freely as a health-promoting exercise.
But they do provide further evidence that, for some reason, people who drink moderately are less likely to suffer from certain illnesses, including some cardiovascular diseases and type-2 diabetes.
Regular drinking and diabetes
For the new study, researchers wanted to see how much alcohol consumption was associated with the lowest diabetes risk, and determine whether the type of alcohol or the frequency that people drank mattered.
Using data from the Danish Health Examination Survey, they looked at the drinking habits of 28,704 men and 41,847 women, and tracked whether those people developed diabetes within approximately five years. The researchers excluded anyone who already had diabetes, was pregnant at the start of the study, and didn't provide information on their alcohol consumption.
The results showed that the study participants least likely to develop diabetes drank 3-4 days a week. For men, those who drank 14 drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the chart on the left shows below. For women, those who drank nine drinks per week had the lowest risk, as the right-hand chart shows.
As the U-shaped risk curve shows, study participants who didn't drink at all se Continue reading

Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes

Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes


Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes
Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:16425 (2017)
Neighborhood characteristics are increasingly connected with health outcomes. Social processes affect health through the maintenance of social norms, stimulation of new interests, and dispersal of knowledge. We created zip code level indicators of happiness, food, and physical activity culture from geolocated Twitter data to examine the relationship between these neighborhood characteristics and obesity and diabetes diagnoses (Type 1 and Type 2). We collected 422,094 tweets sent from Utah between April 2015 and March 2016. We leveraged administrative and clinical records on 1.86 million individuals aged 20 years and older in Utah in 2015. Individuals living in zip codes with the greatest percentage of happy and physically-active tweets had lower obesity prevalenceaccounting for individual age, sex, nonwhite race, Hispanic ethnicity, education, and marital status, as well as zip code population characteristics. More happy tweets and lower caloric density of food tweets in a zip code were associated with lower individual prevalence of diabetes. Results were robust in sibling random effects models that account for family background characteristics shared between siblings. Findings suggest the possible influence of sociocultural factors on individual health. The study demonstrates the utility and cost-effectiveness of utilizing existing big data sources to conduct population health studies.
Where we live, including the social, political, e Continue reading

4 Easy Exercises That Can Help You Manage Diabetes

4 Easy Exercises That Can Help You Manage Diabetes


4 Easy Exercises That Can Help You Manage Diabetes
Its no secret that exercise has health benefitsfrom helping to control weight to improving mood and delivering oxygen and nutrients needed for that energy boost. People who have been diagnosed with diabetes are no exception. According to Sheri Colberg, PhD , exercise physiologist and diabetes educator, the activities that are really important for people with diabetes fall into four main categories: aerobic (or cardio) fitness, resistance training, flexibility, and balance training. Each of these plays a role in helping to keep you healthy and happy.
In addition to helping with weight loss, which is especially important for those with type-2 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association ranks aerobic exercise as one of the most important activities for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes to engage in. Why? Not only does it improve heart health and blood circulation, but a erobic exercise also helps your body use insulin better . In general, the CDC recommends you aim for 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic exercise at least five days a week, aiming for no more than two consecutive exercise-free days. The most common activity for people with type-2 diabetes is walking, says Colberg. So start by engaging in 30 minutes of brisk walking to help you hit that magical 10,000 steps a day .
Looking for something a bit more challenging? Pick up a jump rope and hop to it. The best part: In just 15 minutes , you can get a heart-healthy workout .
While aerobic training burns more calories, resistance training Continue reading

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