diabetestalk.net

AMAZING! Daughter Cures Dad’s Type 2 Diabetes At Age 8!

AMAZING! Daughter Cures Dad’s Type 2 Diabetes At Age 8!

AMAZING! Daughter Cures Dad’s Type 2 Diabetes At Age 8!

Haile Thomas, from Tucson, Ariz., may be young, but she is mighty powerful. When she was just five-years-old she began her cooking career, helping her mother prepare the family meals — but not the ordinary chicken-fingers-and-grilled-cheese kid fare. “My parents are from Jamaica, so I grew up eating oxtail and jerk chicken,” she says. With her adventurous palate and knack for wielding a whisk, it wasn’t long before Thomas was helping plan the weekly menu.
The cooking started out of love for her dad.
“When I was 8 years old, my dad was diagnosed with Type-2 Diabetes, a disease caused by unhealthy lifestyle choices,” explains Thomas. “This diagnosis opened the eyes of my entire family. We started to learn about the importance of exercise and how food really effects the body, and realized that we were consuming way too much FAKE, FAST, & CHEAP foods with NO nutritional value.”
“We started to cook even more often at home, eat fresh fruits and vegetables, and exercise more. Within a couple of years my dad’s diabetes was completely reversed with no medication, only healthy lifestyle changes.”
“And while these amazing changes were happening for my family, I discovered that kids my age and younger were being diagnosed with Type-2 Diabetes, Heart Disease, and many other lifestyle related diseases,” continues Thomas. “I couldn’t help but notice that my friends at school or people I knew weren’t really aware of issues with food & exercise. And that made me wonder if a majority of American kids and families were just like those in my community. And I qui Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Why Does Diabetes Make You Thirsty?

Why Does Diabetes Make You Thirsty?

Two of the most common symptoms of diabetes are increased thirst and increased urine production.
These symptoms are so prevalent in diabetics that they are often the reason why someone visits the doctor and is eventually diagnosed with the disease. But it is no coincidence that the two symptoms appear to be directly connected.
Why Diabetes Makes You Thirsty
Diabetes is a condition characterized by an excess buildup of sugar in the body. This buildup is due to the body's inability to process sugar correctly; instead of sugar being used for energy, it ends up in the bloodstream.
As with all other material in the bloodstream, sugar eventually makes its way to the kidneys. The kidneys' function is to filter out impurities from the blood and expel them from the body by way of urine. But when sugar starts to collect in the kidneys, they sense a problem. In order to remove the excess sugar, they begin to work harder but are still not able to handle the increased load.
The kidneys need more fluid to handle the extra sugar volume. They find this fluid in the only resource that they have, by removing it from the body's tissues, leaving the tissues lacking sufficient hydration. This action automatically notifies the brain that there is a deficit of liquid in the body, and the brain responds by putting out messages that the body requires more fluids to replenish what has been taken from the tissues, causing excessive thirst.
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, Continue reading

How Gut Bacteria Affects Diabetes, Plus Gut Health Dos and Donts

How Gut Bacteria Affects Diabetes, Plus Gut Health Dos and Donts

It has become clear that having good overall mental and physical health depends on having healthy intestinal bacteria.
Those with diabetes should nurture their beneficial gut bacteria for general well-being, plus four specific reasons. One is that intestinal flora seems related to diabetes onset and progression. The other reasons involve concerns those with diabetes often face: inflammation, weight gain or obesity, and depression.
Diabetes and Gut Health: 4 Concerns
1. Diabetes Onset/Symptoms
Scientists have discovered the gut bacteria of people with type 2 diabetes is different from non-diabetics. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes have too few microbes poetically named Firmicutes, but have an overabundance of those called Bacteriodetes and Proteobacteria.
Amazingly, Dr. Max Nieuwdorp, a Dutch microbiome researcher, reversed type 2 diabetes in 250 study participants by re-populating their guts' bacteria using fecal transplantation. Though the thought of a fecal transplant is a bit off-putting, his resolution of diabetes by changing intestinal flora is remarkable.
The onset of type 1 diabetes also tends to follow alterations in gut bacteria, and investigators are finding that certain microbes can actually help prevent this condition.
2. Weight Gain and Obesity
It seems increasingly likely that poor gut health is related to weight gain and obesity. For instance, when researchers removed four types of bacteria (Lactobacillus, Allobaculum, Rikenelleceae, and Candidatus) from lab animals, it led to their obesity by triggering metabolic changes.
Other research revealed th Continue reading

Diabetes-Friendly Shrimp Scampi

Diabetes-Friendly Shrimp Scampi

Serves 4
Ingredients
1 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp olive oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
11-15 medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
1 Tbsp seasoned dry bread crumbs
2 Tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
Preparation
In a large non-stick skillet over high heat, heat butter and oil. When butter starts to brown, add garlic. Reduce heat and cook 1 minute, stirring to prevent garlic from over-browning.
Add shrimp and cook 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add wine, lemon juice, salt and pepper and cook 2 minutes or until shrimp are cooked through. Stir in bread crumbs and parsley. Serve.
Nutrition Information per Serving
110.5 Calories
9.7 g Fat
7.6 mg Cholesterol
351.5 mg Sodium
3 g Carbohydrate
0.5 g Protein
Source: Food.com
Not every recipe on our site is appropriate for every person with diabetes. Please follow the recommendations of your doctor, dietitian or nutritionist.
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up.
Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatment.
In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either doesn't produce any insulin, or the insulin that is produced is not properly utilized. This is due to a condition known as insulin resistance, which prevents key parts of the body (such as muscle, fat and the liver) from responding to ins Continue reading

New drug treats root cause of type 2 diabetes, could reverse the disease

New drug treats root cause of type 2 diabetes, could reverse the disease

A modified version of niclosamide, a drug that currently treats intestinal parasites, could be the key to reversing type 2 diabetes, according to new research from a Rutgers professor.
Victor Shengkan Jin reports that one of the major causes of insulin resistance is excessive fat in the liver, which prevents the body from absorbing glucose and using it as fuel.
The new drug, however, burns away this excess fat in a process called mitochondrial uncoupling - which enables the cells to burn away the fat.
“The cell is like a car and the mitochondria are the engine,” Jin said in an article on Rutgers' website. “What we’re doing inside cells is like putting the car’s transmission into neutral by uncoupling it from the transmission. Then you step on the gas so the engine runs full throttle but the car doesn’t move. If too much of the fuel in the cell is fat, you keep burning it until the fuel gauge reaches empty. Without the interference of fat, you hope that sugar will then enter the cell normally.”
Resetting insulin
Without excessive fat in the liver, cells can appropriately respond to insulin and enable better regulation of blood sugar.
The drug hasn't been tested in humans, but Jin says the results seen in mammals point to the idea that it would have a good safety profile for people too.
"We wanted a safe and practical compound to deplete fat inside cells,” he explained. “We went to the literature and found an approved drug that does in parasitic worms what we wanted to do in liver cells."
The study is published in the journal Nature Medicine.
Source: Rutgers Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles