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Alzheimer's Treatment: Diabetes Drug Holds Promise For Fighting Disease After 'significantly Reversing' Memory Loss

Alzheimer's treatment: Diabetes drug holds promise for fighting disease after 'significantly reversing' memory loss

Alzheimer's treatment: Diabetes drug holds promise for fighting disease after 'significantly reversing' memory loss

A drug developed for type 2 diabetes significantly reverses memory loss and could have potential as a new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, scientists say.
The study, by UK and Chinese universities, is the first to look at a new combined diabetes drug and found improvements in several characteristic symptoms of Alzheimer’s.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher, from Lancaster University, said these “very promising outcomes” show multi-action drugs developed for type 2 diabetes “consistently show neurological protective effects”.
Independent academics said a reduction in nerve-cell-killing protein molecules was particularly interesting and this was likely to be another avenue in the search for an elusive drug to combat dementia.
He has previously reported optimistic findings from an older diabetes drug, liraglutide, and clinical trials in humans are currently under way.
This latest study, published in the journal Brain Research, looked at a “triple action” treatment that combine three different drugs for type 2 diabetes, acting on biological pathways that could also have an impact on dementia.
Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for Alzhemier’s disease and impaired production of insulin – the hormone that people with diabetes don’t produce sufficiently to control their blood sugar – is linked to brain degeneration.
The identification of this link had a twofold benefit, according to charities.
It opened up new research and drug development opportunities, such as this study.
But it also means that by maki Continue reading

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Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Summary: Lancaster University researchers report a drug developed to treat diabetes shows promise in reversing memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s in mouse models of the disease. The drug appears to have a neuroprotective effect, enhancing brain growth factors while reducing amyloid plaques, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The drug also slows down the rate of neuron loss.
Source: Lancaster University.
A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s after scientists found it “significantly reversed memory loss” in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.”
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer’s Society, who part- funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “”With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s. It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research co Continue reading

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's

A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease."
Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them."
Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer's, so further development of this work is crucial."
This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain Continue reading

Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Mice With Alzheimer’s

Diabetes Drug ‘Significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ in Mice With Alzheimer’s

A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s after scientists found it “significantly reversed memory loss” in mice through a triple method of action.
The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes.
Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.”
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer’s Society, who part-funded the research.
Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s. It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them.”
Although the benefits of these ‘triple agonist’ drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer’s, so further development of this work is crucial.”
This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in Continue reading

THE MINIMUM AGE FOR DIABETES IS DECLINING

THE MINIMUM AGE FOR DIABETES IS DECLINING

Watch out if your child drinks too much water and urinates too frequently!
Diabetes is encountered not only in adults but also in children. Professor Serap Semiz, head of the Pediatric Endocrinology Department in the Faculty of Medicine of Acıbadem University and a pediatrician at Acıbadem Kadıköy Hospital, states that while Type 1 diabetes, which is the type usually diagnosed in children, is encountered only very rarely in children under the age of 2, most children diagnosed with the disease in recent years are under the age of 5. In this article, Professor Semiz shares with families the ways of coping with Type 1 diabetes.
Stating that 90% of the patients who developed diabetes during childhood or adolescence have Type 1 diabetes and that the disease occurs most frequently at age 5 or 6, as well as during adolescence, Professor Serap Semiz notes that, in recent years, the rate of incidence in children below age 5 has increased.
Type 1 diabetes, which is usually triggered by environmental factors, is an autoimmune disease. In other words, our autoimmune system, which protects us from diseases, can sometimes misguidedly attack the healthy cells in our body as if they are foreign cells. When such an attack is against the beta cells of the pancreas which produce insulin, the resulting insulin deficiency causes diabetes to develop. In such cases, the insulin needed by the body has to be given externally.
The symptoms that give away the disease
It is important for the symptoms of diabetes to be recognized early in order to cope with diabetes. Professor Serap Semiz, who urge Continue reading

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