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All About Dog Diabetes

All About Dog Diabetes

All About Dog Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that impacts lots of mammals including humans and dogs. It occurs when the body’s ability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin is impaired.
Canine diabetes is incurable, but it’s a manageable disorder. With proper treatment, diabetic dogs can lead long, healthy, happy lives.
How does canine diabetes work?
The most common form of diabetes in dogs is diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes.” As its name implies, sugar diabetes is a condition that affects your dog’s blood sugar level. A small organ near the stomach, the pancreas, is responsible for regulating blood sugar by producing insulin.
Here’s how it works: when your dog eats, her food is broken down into tiny components including carbohydrates. Carbs are then converted into simple sugars, including glucose. The pancreas releases insulin go help turn glucose to fuel inside your dog’s cells.
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If there’s not enough insulin available, glucose can’t get into cells. This can lead to a dangerously high glucose concentration in your dog’s bloodstream.
Two forms of dog diabetes
In a healthy dog, the pancreas produces insulin to moderate the sugar in their system. In a diabetic dog, the pancreas either can’t produce enough insulin, or the dog’s body can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. These are the two forms of diabetes:
Insulin-deficiency diabetes: the most common type of canine diabetes. Occurs when the dog’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin. Dogs with insulin-deficiency diabetes need daily insulin shots to replace what their body c Continue reading

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Confirmed Anew: Cow Milk May Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

Confirmed Anew: Cow Milk May Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

For quite some time the link between juvenile onset diabetes (type 1) and cow’s milk consumption has been noted in the scientific literature. You can view 12 such references on our page on Cow Milk. In genetically susceptible individuals the consumption of cow’s milk may trigger an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. A new study, published in the journal Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, has shed light on a possible new mechanism behind this connection.
Finish researchers looked at 1113 infants with a genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes and who were randomly assigned to receive one of three infant formulas during the first 6 months of life whenever breast milk was not available:
Cow’s milk formula (CMF)
Whey-based hydrolyzed formula (WHF)
Whey-based formula free of bovine insulin (insulin-free CMF)
Beta cell autoimmunity was monitored at ages 3,6, and 12 months and then annually until 3 years of age. The results were reported as follows:
In comparison with ordinary CMF, weaning to an insulin-free CMF reduced the cumulative incidence of autoantibodies by age 3 years in children at genetic risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus.
The likelihood of finding autoantibodies associated with beta cell autoimmunity was 25% lower in the whey-based hydrolyzed formula group, and 61% lower in the insulin-free whey-based formula when compared with the cow’s milk formula group.
Discussion
This study brings to the fore a serious problem associated with drinking the milk of another species. The protein composition within cow’ Continue reading

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

The Oscar-winning actor announced he has type 2 diabetes when late-night host David Letterman commented on his newly slim figure in October 2013. "I went to the doctor and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated. You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'" Hanks added that the condition is controllable, but he joked that he couldn't get back down to his high-school weight of 96 pounds. "I was a very skinny boy!"
The talk show host has type 2 diabetes. "It's definitely controllable," King has said on his show. Diabetes makes heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and other serious health problems more likely. King has had bypass heart surgery. Diabetes wasn't the only thing that raised his risk for ticker trouble: King had been a heavy smoker, and smoking hurts the heart. But by taking care of his diabetes (and quitting smoking), King helps his ticker and the rest of his body.
Salma Hayek
The Oscar-nominee had gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy, while expecting her daughter, Valentina. Hayek has a family history of diabetes. Experts say all women should get checked for gestational diabetes when they are 24-28 weeks pregnant. Those at risk for type 2 diabetes are checked at their first prenatal visit. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after delivery, but it could return with a later pregnancy. It can also make you more likely to get type 2 diabetes later on.
This singer went public with his type 1 diabetes in 2007. He has said that his symptoms included weight loss and thi Continue reading

Did You Know These Celebrities Are Living With Diabetes?

Did You Know These Celebrities Are Living With Diabetes?

Despite their high profile, these celebrities are open about living with diabetes and the struggles they face in managing the condition.
In 2013, Tom Hanks revealed on the “Late Show” with David Letterman that he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The star – known for playing the roles of Forest Gump, Woody from Toy Story, and FBI Agent Carl Hanratty, among others – blamed himself for developing the disease and says he ignored medical advice for years before discovering he had type 2 diabetes.
During his interview with Letterman, Hanks said, “I went to the doctor, and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated! You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'”
According to the World Health Organization, type 2 diabetes, also known as non-insulin dependent or adult-onset diabetes, “results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Type 2 diabetes comprises the majority of people with diabetes around the world, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity.”[1]
Luckily, the acclaimed actor has made an effort to control his weight and to keep his blood sugars at a manageable level through proper dieting and by losing weight since his diagnosis.
Believe it or not, Miami Dolphins’ quarterback Jay Cutler is also living (and playing football) with diabetes. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, Cutler has a lot to consider besides strategy when prepping for games.
During the 2007 NFL season, Cutler was often tired, felt weak, and even lost 33 pounds. It turns Continue reading

Woodford and Swinburn offer new evidence that type-1 diabetes is linked to the level of A1 beta-casein in most types of cows milk

Woodford and Swinburn offer new evidence that type-1 diabetes is linked to the level of A1 beta-casein in most types of cows milk

Content supplied by Keith Woodford*
[The article below was intended to be published some weeks back at The Conversation. The Conversation is the online portal, funded by Universities in Australia, New Zealand and the UK, where academics are encouraged to communicate and converse with non-academics. However, this particular article was blocked at the last minute by the Senior Editor(s) at The Conversation, having previously been approved within their editorial system. The Senior Editor(s) felt that the interests of associated commercial parties, who might benefit from dissemination of the article, were too great. A fuller story of that publishing saga will be posted shortly.
The content, formatting and supporting links are shown as originally agreed with The Conversation and reflect the prior input of one of their editors. This article can be freely republished, with acknowledgements as to source: [https://keithwoodford.wordpress.com].
Authors: Keith Woodford & Boyd Swinburn
Disclosures: See end of article
Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, is on the rise globally.
Early evidence of an association between type 1 diabetes and a protein in cow milk, known as A1 beta-casein, was published in 2003. However, the notion that the statistically strong association could be causal has remained controversial.
As part of a seven-person team, we have reviewed the overall evidence that links A1 beta-casein to type 1 diabetes. Our research brings forward new ways of looking at that evidence.
Different types of diabetes
Type 1 d Continue reading

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