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ACE Inhibitors And Statins In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

ACE Inhibitors and Statins in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

ACE Inhibitors and Statins in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

Among adolescents with type 1 diabetes, rapid increases in albumin excretion during puberty precede the development of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, long-term risk factors for renal and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that adolescents with high levels of albumin excretion might benefit from angiotensin-converting–enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins, drugs that have not been fully evaluated in adolescents.
We screened 4407 adolescents with type 1 diabetes between the ages of 10 and 16 years of age and identified 1287 with values in the upper third of the albumin-to-creatinine ratios; 443 were randomly assigned in a placebo-controlled trial of an ACE inhibitor and a statin with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design minimizing differences in baseline characteristics such as age, sex, and duration of diabetes. The primary outcome for both interventions was the change in albumin excretion, assessed according to the albumin-to-creatinine ratio calculated from three early-morning urine samples obtained every 6 months over 2 to 4 years, and expressed as the area under the curve. Key secondary outcomes included the development of microalbuminuria, progression of retinopathy, changes in the glomerular filtration rate, lipid levels, and measures of cardiovascular risk (carotid intima–media thickness and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and asymmetric dimethylarginine).
The primary outcome was not affected by ACE inhibitor therapy, statin therapy, or the combination of the two. The use of an ACE inhibitor was associated with a lower incidence of microal Continue reading

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14 Home Remedies for Diabetes

14 Home Remedies for Diabetes

Did you know that if you leave your diabetes untreated it can lead to various other diseases like kidney disease, blood vessel damage, infections, heart disease, nerve damage, high blood pressure, blindness an even stroke, limb amputation, and coma! But the good news is that you can manage diabetes easily once you get in the habit of it. It is only when you know that you are suffering from diabetes. A good number of people don’t even realize that they suffer from this disease! They don’t pay attention to the initial symptoms of diabetes that are generally very mild in nature and include fatigue, weakness and urge to urinate frequently. If you too have experienced these symptoms of late, you should immediately visit your doctor and get the tests done to confirm or rule out the probability of having diabetes.
Home Remedies for Diabetes
If you are lucky enough, you will not be diagnosed as a diabetic. However, if your test reports say that you are a diabetic, you will also come to know about whether you have Type I diabetes or Type II diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, the hormone that helps your body cells in utilizing blood sugar. On the other hand, in Type 2 Diabetes, your body cells do not respond properly to the insulin or your pancreas does not produce enough insulin. There is a wide belief that only Type 2 diabetes can be cured through home remedies for diabetes but many researches have established that many plant compounds found in some common foods can stimulate cells in the pancreas and cure even Type I diabetes. However, if you take Continue reading

Millions of Americans Are at Risk for Diabetes. Here’s How to Get Screened

Millions of Americans Are at Risk for Diabetes. Here’s How to Get Screened

November is National Diabetes Month.
In the U.S., approximately 29.1 million people are living with diabetes (either type 1 or type 2). Medical expenditures for those people are as much as 2.3 times higher than for a person living without diabetes.
Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational
Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, is most often diagnosed in children, teens and young adults.
Type 2 diabetes is more common. It makes up about 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, yet it’s estimated that in 2015, as many as 7.2 million adults were undiagnosed. That same year, 84.1 million Americans aged 18 and older had prediabetes, which is a precursor to type 2 diabetes.
Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy but often goes away soon after delivery. However, if you’ve ever been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you and your baby are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.
Fortunately, there are simple and fairly inexpensive (and sometimes even free!) tests that can let you know if you have diabetes or if you’re at risk of developing it later in life.
Who Should Get Screened for Diabetes
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that adults aged 40 to 70 be screened for abnormal blood glucose and diabetes. However, if you or a family member are experiencing what may be symptoms of type 2 diabetes, you should talk to a medical professional about your concerns, regardless of age.
(Type 1 diabetes is unlike type 2 in that type 1 is too often diagnosed only when it reaches a critical point, meaning most symptoms may Continue reading

The Paleo Diet and Diabetes: Preventing and Healing Type 2 Diabetes

The Paleo Diet and Diabetes: Preventing and Healing Type 2 Diabetes

50% of Americans are pre-diabetic. Can getting back to your ancestral roots reduce your risk?
We’re in the midst of a diabetes (type 2) epidemic. The global burden of diabetes doubled from 1980 to 2014, and it is rising rapidly in low to middle income families and countries. (1) The World Health Organization predicts that by the year 2030, diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in the world. (2)
Today, 50% of Americans are classified as pre-diabetic or diabetic, despite experts being in agreement that the standard American diet (SAD) figures centrally in the pathogenesis of “diseases of civilization,” such as diabetes. (3) Can getting back to your ancestral roots and adopting a Paleo diet reduce your risk or reverse pre-diabetes and diabetes?
What is Diabetes?
After you eat a meal, your food travels from your gut to your liver, and finally into your bloodstream. In order to get blood sugars from your bloodstream INTO the cells, your pancreas releases insulin, which signals cell receptors to take up glucose. Insulin’s job (amongst many other tasks) is to lower your blood sugar levels and deliver the glucose to your tissues to fuel activity and cellular processes.
Suffering from Diabetes or blood sugar imbalance? Grab our FREE Diabetes Guide & 7 Day Meal Plan here!
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the beta cells of the pancreas do not produce insulin. This is where the wonders of modern medicine save the day, providing lifesaving insulin that can be delivered after each meal. This condition requires the use of exogenous (i.e., medication) i Continue reading

Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes as an Adult? You Are Not Alone

Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes as an Adult? You Are Not Alone

What happens when you're diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as an adult? LADA - latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, also sometimes called diabetes 1.5, can strike later in life than typical type 1 diabetes.
Imagine that you are in your twenties, thirties, or even your forties or fifties. You are progressing down your chosen path in life, whether it's an established career, a relationship, marriage, children or all of the above.
All of a sudden, you're losing weight, thirsty and in the bathroom all the time, and you feel like you have no energy. You just plain don't feel good.
You find out that you have type 1 diabetes, and your world is turned upside down, at least until you get the hang of managing diabetes in the middle of everything else you have to do in life.
There aren't many resources for adults diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Most of the literature and support is geared toward kids because typically type 1 strikes children and teens. Not so long ago, type 1 diabetes was known as "juvenile diabetes."
How does it feel to be hit with a disease that is usually diagnosed in children? E-mails and comments from readers talk about some of the issues of dealing with a new diagnosis of type 1 as an adult.
Mary, on feelings of isolation with adult onset type 1 diabetes
I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 42.
My doctor had never met a type 1 adult before and absolutely freaked. She rang the specialist and talked to him in front of me before even telling me of her diagnosis. Since then I have self-managed my diabetes control and go through periods of frustration and Continue reading

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