diabetestalk.net

#AADE17: An Uncertain Future For Diabetes Education

#AADE17: An Uncertain Future for Diabetes Education

#AADE17: An Uncertain Future for Diabetes Education

What will diabetes education look like in 5-10 years? Or moving into 2030 for that matter?
One thing that became clear at the recent annual meeting of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) in Indianapolis is that there's some serious concern about this profession, which has been at a crossroads for at least a decade now, and we've wondered in the past if the organization was "lost at sea" in adapting to current trends.
To keep up with the changing times, some wonder now if we've reached a point where CDEs (Certified Diabetes Educators) might need to drop that official title in favor of something with more of a coaching bent, like "diabetes care coordinators," facilitators, managers, or possibly even "Diabetes Champions" (!)
Whatever the term, a big theme at the AADE conference was the fact that these healthcare team members have some of the highest potential to help PWDs (people with diabetes) by recognizing what's working and what isn't, and identifying other health or social issues that may be lurking beneath the surface. Yet CDEs are struggling to redefine their roles in a changing healthcare landscape, and are battling economic realities that prevent many patients from accessing them, or even knowing about the services they provide.
Ten years ago, the big crisis in diabetes education that people were talking about most was the shrinking pool of people going into the profession. But today's crossroads are more about the onslaught of new technology, and uncertainties around insurance coverage and overall access to these professionals who can really help PW Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
A Tale of a Diabetes Pizza Study

A Tale of a Diabetes Pizza Study


Dario doesnt just log and track glucose levels, it charts carb intake, insulin doses, exercise, moods, and more and gives you insights to help understand what may be effecting your blood glucose. The user-centric design of the Dario app allows logbooks, timelines, and charts to be easily shared with loved ones and healthcare providers.
Download the Dario App today and scroll down for more information on how to get started.
For questions regarding the set up and use of your Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System, orders, or other technical support issues, please contact our Customer Service Center at 1-800-895-5921, Monday Friday, 9AM 5PM Eastern.
For general inquiries about the Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System, please fill out the form below and a representative will reach out to you.
This form is not for technical support or medical advice. For technical support issues, please call our toll free number 1-800-895-5921 for assistance. If there is an urgent medical issue, please contact your physician.
When pizza meets diabetes in a medical research.
You may have a certain image that comes to mind when you think of a clinical trial. But did you know that a study can involve eating pizza?
There are certain foods that I have to eat with aspray and pray mentality where I can only hope for the best. All too often though, the best is rarely realized. When I was approached by the Joslin Institute for Transformational Technology Program, which is new group headed by Dr. Howard Wolpert in Boston, and they asked me to be a subject in a pizza study, I signed up right awa Continue reading

Why Are We Waiting To Treat Diabetes Until A1c Reaches 6.5%?

Why Are We Waiting To Treat Diabetes Until A1c Reaches 6.5%?


Home / Conditions / Prediabetes / Why Are We Waiting To Treat Diabetes Until A1c Reaches 6.5%?
Why Are We Waiting To Treat Diabetes Until A1c Reaches 6.5%?
Getting type 2 diabetes at an early age increases risk for all diabetes complications, including death.
Going back years, the diagnosis of diabetes was a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of 180 mg/dl. Today, its an FPG of 126 mg/dl or greater, or an A1C of 6.5% or greater. But should the diagnostic standard move even further, to 100 mg/dl, a lower A1C, and treatment for diabetes start much earlier?
To examine the association between early onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and clinical behavioral risk factors for later complications of diabetes, 5,115 people with type 2 were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Risk factors at time of diagnosis among those diagnosed at 45 years (early onset) with diagnosis age 46 to 55, 56 to 65 (average onset = reference), 66 to 75, and >75 years (late onset) were recorded.
According to the analysis, being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a young age comes with more serious complications and higher rates of death than being diagnosed later in life.
We know that it takes many years to develop complications in diabetes and having type 2 at a younger age equates to a higher lifetime risk of complications given the projected length of exposure to high glucose and other risk factors. This includes higher death rates, which rose to six times higher when subjects were in early middle age.
Those diagnosed between ages 15 and 30 had more severe nerve damage and signs of early kidney di Continue reading

Unprocessed Red and Processed Meats and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease and Type 2 Diabetes  An Updated Review of the Evidence

Unprocessed Red and Processed Meats and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease and Type 2 Diabetes An Updated Review of the Evidence


Unprocessed Red and Processed Meats and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease and Type 2 Diabetes An Updated Review of the Evidence
We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in.
The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders.
Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient.
Unprocessed Red and Processed Meats and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease and Type 2 Diabetes An Updated Review of the Evidence
Renata Micha, Georgios Michas, and Dariush Mozaffarian
Growing evidence suggests that effects of red meat consumption on coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes could vary depending on processing. We reviewed the evidence for effects of unprocessed (fresh/frozen) red and processed (using sodium/other preservatives) meat consumption on CHD and diabetes. In meta-analyses of prospective cohorts, higher risk of CHD is seen with processed meat consumption (RR per 50 g: 1.42, 95 %CI = 1.071.89), but a smaller increase or no risk is seen with unprocessed meat consumption. Differences in sodium content (~400 % higher in processed meat) appear to account for about two-thirds of this risk difference. In similar analyses, both unprocessed red and processed meat consumption are associated with incident diabetes, with higher risk per g of processed (RR per 50 g: 1.51, 95 %CI = 1.251.83) v Continue reading

Metabolic surgery for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus: Now supported by the world's leading diabetes organizations

Metabolic surgery for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus: Now supported by the world's leading diabetes organizations

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are chronic diseases that often coexist. Combined, they account for tremendous morbidity and mortality. Approximately 85% of all patients with type 2 DM have a body mass index (BMI) categorizing them as overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m) or obese (BMI > 30.0 kg/m) (Figure 1). Obesity is strongly associated with diabetes and is a major cause of insulin resistance that leads to the cascade of hyperglycemia, glucotoxicity, and beta-cell failure, which ultimately leads to the development of microvascular (neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy) and macrovascular (myocardial infarction, stroke) complications. Treatment guidelines emphasize that both diabetes and obesity should be treated to optimize long-term outcomes. Metabolic surgery is the only diabetes treatment proven to result in long-term remission in 23% to 60% of patients depending upon preoperative duration of diabetes and disease severity. This review presents the evidence supporting use of metabolic surgery as a primary treatment for type 2 DM, potential mechanisms for its effects, associated complications, and recommendations for its use in expanded patient populations.
First-line therapy with lifestyle management and second-line therapy with medications, including oral agents and insulin, are the mainstays of type 2 DM therapy. Although these approaches have reduced hyperglycemia and cardiovascular mortality, many patients have poor glycemic control and develop severe diabetes-related complications. A study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • What is the future for diabetes treatment?

    The future of treating Type 1 diabetes There are few conditions that science has made such a fundamental impact on as Type 1 diabetes - the first use of insulin in the 1920s transformed it from a death sentence into something people can live with. But even today, Type 1 diabetes typically involves a lifetime of daily injections and, on average, people with it die younger than the rest of the popul ...

  • Diabetes 2030: Insights from Yesterday, Today, and Future Trends

    Diabetes and its complications, deaths, and societal costs have a huge and rapidly growing impact on the United States. Between 1990 and 2010 the number of people living with diabetes tripled and the number of new cases annually (incidence) doubled.1 Adults with diabetes have a 50% higher risk of death from any cause than adults without diabetes, in addition to risk for myriad complications.2 Redu ...

  • Diabetes increase putting NHS future 'at stake'

    INDYPULSE Diabetes increase putting NHS future 'at stake' Tackling diabetes is “fundamental” to the future of NHS as the number of adults with the condition nears four million, Public Health England has warned. Around 3.8 million adults in England now have diabetes, with at least 940,000 of those undiagnosed, new figures have revealed. About 90 per cent of the cases are Type 2 diabetes, which ...

  • Are synthetic insulin-secreting cells the future of diabetes treatment?

    2 pictures While treatments for type 1 diabetes are rapidly evolving, even the most recent hi-tech artificial pancreas system still involves glucose monitors and insulin pumps. But a new development from scientists at the University of North Carolina and NC State could do away with the need for injections and glucose monitoring through the use of artificial beta cells that mimic the insulin-secret ...

  • Platypus Venom Could Be The Future of Diabetes Treatments

    Scientists have found a promising new lead for diabetes treatments in perhaps the unlikeliest of places: the venom of the Australian 'duck-billed' platypus. The platypus – along with its compatriot, the echidna – are the world's only surviving monotremes, which means they're egg-laying mammals. But what also sets these animals apart is they've evolved to produce a hormone variant, and it's one ...

  • The Future of Diabetes Management

    Director at The Medical Futurist Institute (Keynote Speaker, Author & Visionary) Diabetes is an adamant condition requiring constant attention. Let me show you how technology can take the burden off the shoulders of suffering patients andtheir loved ones. One in eleven persons has to cope with diabetes worldwide on a daily basis According to the latest estimates of the WHO, 422 million people ...

  • Prescription Broccoli in a Pill Seen as the Potential Future of Diabetes Treatment

    Prescription Broccoli in a Pill Seen as the Potential Future of Diabetes Treatment The life-changing disease Type 2 Diabetes is on the rise worldwide, and especially alarming is the fact that rates are on the rise among children and teenagers, potentially condemning them to a lifetime of dependence on pills, shots, blood-sugar testing, and doctors visits. There are many natural alternatives to ...

  • Resistance training to improve type 2 diabetes: working toward a prescription for the future

    Resistance training to improve type 2 diabetes: working toward a prescription for the future Nutrition & Metabolism volume14, Articlenumber:24 (2017) Cite this article The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is rapidly increasing, and effective strategies to manage and prevent this disease are urgently needed. Resistance training (RT) promotes health benefits through increased skeletal muscle ...

  • The gut microbiome as a target for prevention and treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes: from current human evidence to future possibilities

    , Volume 60, Issue6 , pp 943951 | Cite as The gut microbiome as a target for prevention and treatment of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes: from current human evidence to future possibilities The totality of microbial genomes in the gut exceeds the size of the human genome, having around 500-fold more genes that importantly complement our coding potential. Microbial genes are essential for key ...

Related Articles