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A Practical Approach To Hypertension Management In Diabetes

A Practical Approach to Hypertension Management in Diabetes

A Practical Approach to Hypertension Management in Diabetes


, Volume 8, Issue5 , pp 981989 | Cite as
A Practical Approach to Hypertension Management in Diabetes
Hypertension is one of the most important comorbidities of diabetes, contributing significantly to death and disability and leads to macrovascular and microvascular complications. When assessing the medical priorities for patients with diabetes, treating hypertension should be a primary consideration. Practical approaches to hypertension in diabetes, including individualized targets are discussed, as per stage and complication of diabetes, according to current studies and guidelines. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are the most effective drugs for treating hypertension in diabetes, in the absence of contraindications. Calcium antagonists or diuretics are acceptable as second-line agents. Once the target is achieved, antihypertensive drugs should be continued. Newer antidiabetes medications such as sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i), glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP1-RA), and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4i) have antihypertensive properties and may assist in treatment decision-making.
AntidiabeticAntihypertensiveAzilsartanDiabetes, DPP4GLP1RaHypertensionMacrovascularMicrovascularSGLT2
Hypertension is one of the most important comorbidities of diabetes [ 1 , 2 ], contributing significantly to death and disability [ 3 ]. It is responsible for macrovascular (atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke) and microvascular (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephr Continue reading

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Derek Theler: Diabetes Warrior

Derek Theler: Diabetes Warrior


Its a superhero! Its a Baby Daddy! Its a Dexcom Warrior! Its Derek Theler!
The Marvels New Warriors actor is the face of Dexcoms Call of the Warrior campaign, launching this month. Derek spoke to Beyond Type 1 about what it means to be a superhero both on set and while managing diabetes. Having been diagnosed with Type 1 at age 3, he knows a lot about both.
Derek shared tips for maintaining the warrior-like focus that he uses in nearly every aspect of his life: reaching out about CGM technology as a spokesperson for Dexcom, preparing for a day on set (a diabetes bag is essential), connecting with other diabetic buddies he meets (in real life!), and problem-solving when things go wrong in the most inconvenient of places, like in an audition room or out on the open ocean off of South Africa.
Tell us about partnering with Dexcom on the Call of the Warrior campaign!
The way it works is, we want people to post either photos or videos of themselves giving their best Warrior Call on our Facebook page and Instagram and use #WarriorUp. Its a shout in the face of diabetes. Its a great campaign because people can be creative with it, and anyone can do it.
For each post, Dexcom will give a $1 donation to a bunch of different diabetes charities. Im really excited for this because its not a campaign where I have to ask people for money all you have to do is use #WarriorUp and Dexcom will donate the money.
My younger sister is also a Type 1 diabetic, and shes the reason I got turned on to the Dexcom. She was trying to get pregnant and she realized that a CGM is a really helpful Continue reading

Kid on cutting edge in diabetes trial

Kid on cutting edge in diabetes trial


Jackson 6-year-old tests new insulin pump for Type 1 youngsters.
Cashs mom, Mills Halpin, encourages him to eat more chicken at dinner with his brother in late June. Getting the right amount of carbs can be a guessing game because sometimes he doesnt eat everything, she said.
Cash Halpin shovels the last bite of rice into his mouth and asks for another serving.
I ate all the carbs, he proudly announces, mouth still full.
Yeah, says his mother, Mills Halpin, who rolls her eyes at her 6-year-old son. Eat some protein.
His father, Mike Halpin, is beside him on an opened laptop, checking the latest data available from Cashs insulin pump. The boy is part of a clinical trial testing the Medtronic MiniMed670G, a system capable of continuously monitoring his glucose levels and making microadjustments to keep them consistent throughout the day.
Cash is in the youngest group of participants to be tested, ages 2 to 6. The same Medtronic model was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration last fall for ages 14 and up.
Mike Halpin administers about a unit of insulin, a tiny bubble of hormone to handle the approximately 35 grams of carbs Cash is consuming for dinner. Manual adjustments are still required at mealtimes, but the new system offers his parents a little reprieve, something they havent experienced since hewas diagnosed three years ago.
Halpin has to wear an insulin pump at all times, which monitors his levels and injects insulin when needed through an infusion port under his skin.
With this new system, if they are off a little you just cant be exact all the Continue reading

Newly published research provides new insight into how diabetes leads to retinopathy

Newly published research provides new insight into how diabetes leads to retinopathy


Newly published research provides new insight into how diabetes leads to retinopathy
December 7, 2017 by Kathy Keatley Garvey, UC Davis
Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of adult blindness. Chronically high blood sugar from diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels in the retina, leading to diabetic retinopathy, according to the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Credit: Kathy Keatley Garvey
An international team of scientists led by Professor Ingrid Fleming of Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany, and including Professor Bruce Hammock of the University of California, Davis, provides new insight into the mechanism by which diabetes leads to retinopathy and often to blindness.
An inhibitor to the enzyme, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), discovered in the Hammock lab, prevented the eye disease in diabetic mice, Fleming said.
The paper, "Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Prevents Diabetic Retinopathy," involving six years of research and 22 scientists, is published today (Dec. 6) in the journal Nature.
"This has been a long but exciting project where Dr. Fleming's team used tools developed to study the biology of fatty acid epoxides to probe the fundamental mechanism of diabetic retinopathy," said co-author Hammock, a distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center "This work has targeted many possible sites for intervention that could preserve vision, and one such target Continue reading

Now Monitor Diabetes With a Pain-Free Skin Patch: 5 Foods Which May Help Too

Now Monitor Diabetes With a Pain-Free Skin Patch: 5 Foods Which May Help Too


Now Monitor Diabetes With a Pain-Free Skin Patch: 5 Foods Which May Help Too
Researchers have developed a pain-free skin patch containing dissolvable compounds that responds to blood chemistry to manage glucose automatically.
Food | NDTV Food Desk | Updated: December 27, 2017 13:35 IST
Here's a news that will make all diabetics take a leap of joy. Researchers have developed a pain-free skin patch containing dissolvable compounds that responds to blood chemistry to manage glucose automatically.
Diabetes is a disorder in which which the body's ability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin is impaired, resulting in abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates and spike in blood sugar(glucose) levels. Diabetes is one of the leading global health concerns of the current times. Global incidence of all types of diabetes is about 285 million people, of which 90 per cent have Type-2 diabetes.
A finger prick before mealtimes and maybe an insulin injection is an uncomfortable but necessary routine for people with type 2 diabetes for their ongoing vigilance over the amount of sugar. Bit according to a latest study published online in the journal Nature Communication, researchers have found a biochemical formula of mineralised compounds in the patch that responds to sugar levels for days at a time.
The study conducted over a group of mice, the researchers identified that the biochemically formulated patch of dissolvable microneedles can make the management of Type-2 diabetes much easier.
"This experimental approach could be a way to take advantage of the fact that persons with T Continue reading

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