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A Few Minutes Of Activity Can Lower Blood Pressure In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

A Few Minutes of Activity Can Lower Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

A Few Minutes of Activity Can Lower Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Getting in just a few minutes of activity if you're sedentary most of the day can lower your blood pressure if you have type 2 diabetes, according to new research from the American Heart Assoction.
While it's long been known that exercise is an anecdote to type 2 diabetes, most research has focused on the effects of sustained activity, not shorter bursts.
"It appears you don't have to do very much," said co-author Bronwyn Kingwell, Ph.D., head of Metabolic and Vascular Physiology at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes in Melbourne, Australia. "We saw some marked blood pressure reductions over trial days when people did the equivalent of walking to the water cooler or some simple body-weight movements on the spot."
While light activity breaks shouldn't replace regular exercise, Kingwell said, they can be a practical solution to reducing sitting time.
3-minute walking breaks
The study included 24 overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes who were tracked while they sat for eight hours. The participants were either instructed to take 3-minute walking breaks or do 3 minutes of basic resistance exercises every half-hour.
Results showed that walking was linked to a 10-point drop in systolic blood pressure, while simple resistance activities were associated with a 12-point drop.
According to Kingwell, the muscles that are activated when you move increase the uptake of blood sugar, while also lowering norepinephrine levels, a hormone that can raise blood sugar.
Source: American Heart Association
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate na Continue reading

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Lucozade is changing its formula and people with diabetes have been warned that they need to take care

Lucozade is changing its formula and people with diabetes have been warned that they need to take care

THE Lucozade formula is changing soon and people diabetes have been warned.
Many people have been recommended to drink Lucozade Energy Original when their blood glucose is low.
But they need to be aware that the formulation of the drink is changing from April 2017 and it won't be advertised on the bottle.
Lucozade Energy Original will now contain around 50% less glucose-based carbohydrates so the amount needed to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycaemia, will change.
Hypoglycaemia, often referred to as a "hypo", can be a side-effect of insulin and taking some diabetes medications.
A Diabetes charity spokesperson said: "A blood glucose level below 4mmol/L is considered hypoglycaemia and if you have frequent low blood glucose levels, you should talk to your doctor as your medication may need to be reduced.
Normal guidelines for treating a ‘hypo’
Step 1:
Check your blood glucose if you are feeling shaky or unwell and if it is less than 4mmols/l, take some fast acting carbohydrate immediately, e.g. A glass (150 mls) of non-diet mineral/sugary drink or 150mls fruit juice or three to four glucose sweets, dextrose or Lucozade tablets
If you use Lucozade for treatment, you will now need 170mls to treat a hypo.
Step 2:
Follow up with some starchy carbohydrate, e.g. two plain biscuits or a sandwich, a glass of milk or your next meal if due
Check your blood glucose level 10 -15 minutes later
If blood glucose levels remain less than 4mmol/l, repeat step 1 again
"If you are concerned about whether this affects you, check with your pharmacist or doctor/diabetes team to see if any of y Continue reading

9 Processed Foods People with Diabetes Should Avoid

9 Processed Foods People with Diabetes Should Avoid

If you have diabetes there are certain foods you might have been told to avoid. Maybe you love grapes, but worry they’ll send your blood sugar through the roof. Or perhaps brownies are your absolute favorite dessert, but you’ve given them up because all. That. Sugar.
However, if you’ve been living with the condition for a substantial length of time, you’ve likely been able to find a middle ground that’s achievable without driving you crazy and forcing you to miss out on all the things you love most. You’ve probably realized that you can, and should, still eat fruit because it’s an important part of a healthy diet, as it’s loaded with essential vitamins and minerals. You’ve likely even found an awesome diabetic-friendly brownie recipe that you pull out for special occasions. Because, seriously. Who can go their whole life without a brownie?
But the fact remains: there are certain foods everyone should avoid, but are of particular concern for people with diabetes. And, unfortunately, they’re often the most readily available and convenient option. What are they?
Processed foods. No, not all processed foods. We’re not talking about the wholesome foods we eat that have undergone some form of processing, like spinach that has been plucked and bagged, roasted nuts, or even canned tuna. We’re talking about heavily processed foods that have all sorts of hidden ingredients intended to either preserve the food or add flavor. Foods that no longer resemble, in nutrition, taste, or even appearance, what they once were.
While some of these foods are tasty, many are Continue reading

Man Accused Of Injecting Illegal Drugs At Bus Stop Wants To Raise Greater Awareness Of Diabetes

Man Accused Of Injecting Illegal Drugs At Bus Stop Wants To Raise Greater Awareness Of Diabetes

A man with Type 1 diabetes is on a mission to raise awareness of the illness, after a passerby thought he was injecting himself with illegal drugs.
Ben Lockwood, 26, took to Facebook to explain that his blood sugar levels were high on his way home from work so he gave himself an insulin injection while waiting for the bus. To his surprise, a man nearby remarked: “You can’t do that in a public place you druggie scum bag.”
Lockwood, who is from London, spent the next five minutes educating the man about diabetes and why he needed the injection. He has since shared his experience on social media to raise awareness of the condition.
After his post went viral, Diabetes UK praised the 26-year-old for speaking out. They said patients shouldn’t feel stigmatised for administering treatment and added that putting off an insulin injection, for fear of upsetting other people, could have “very serious effects”.
Regular insulin injections are a daily reality for many of the 4.5 million people in the UK living with diabetes. Yet awareness of the condition could be greater.
Lockwood shared a photo of the orange NovoRapid cartridge on Facebook and explained that after he’d finished describing what it’s like to live with Type 1 diabetes, the stranger who had called him a “druggie scum bag” gave him a hug and apologised.
“I’m gonna use this experience in the most positive way possible, I’m gonna start spreading more awareness about Type 1 diabetes,” Lockwood explained.
“The picture below is of my NovoRapid, it’s in a bright orange cartridge, as you can see. If Continue reading

Singer Nick Jonas Draws a Crowd for Diabetes Discussion

Singer Nick Jonas Draws a Crowd for Diabetes Discussion

Nick Jonas admitted to being scared in 2005 when he learned the reason for his weight loss, irritability and constant thirst was Type 1 diabetes.
“I was nervous and I didn’t know if it would all end right there,” says Jonas, who was only 13 at that time and gaining fame on tour with his siblings, the Jonas Brothers. “I had to do what I had to do to keep going.”
Rolling with it
With help from friends and family, Jonas figured out how to adapt to T1D, an autoimmune disease affecting at least 1.25 million Americans.
That wasn’t easy at first, especially for Jonas, a self-described independent person who had to learn to rely on others to make sure he stayed healthy and his insulin in check. “My go-to advice is to just trust in your family and friends,” he adds.
One of Jonas’ biggest obstacles upon his diagnoses was understanding his body and learning how to stay healthy, especially with a hectic schedule. He counts on a continuous glucose monitor and insulin pump to stay on top of his condition. “These are life changing tools that I literally and figuratively keep in my back pocket,” he says of the devices, which simplify his disease management.
BREAKING THE CHAINS:
Put in perspective
“We all go through something that makes our life challenging,” adds Jonas. “We need to look at it in a different way. My diabetes has definitely made me stronger. It’s a big contributor to my character as a person.”
Jonas has become a source of inspiration for others, most recently through the creation of Beyond Type 1, a non-profit organization focused on raising a Continue reading

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