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A Diabetes Discussion

A Diabetes Discussion

A Diabetes Discussion


Since November 14th is World Diabetes Day , a day dedicated to raise awareness of diabetes, its prevention and complications, and the care that people with the condition need, we decided to sit down with Kathryn Peeden, M.D. (Dr. Katie) to discuss the Type 2 Diabetes epidemic in the United States.
AIM: Hi Dr. Katie. Thank you for sitting down with us to talk about diabetes today.
AIM:Let me first start out by reading you some statistics from the CDCs website : It is estimated that 30.3 million people have diabetes in the United states, which amounts to nearly one in ten people. Since only 5% of those with diabetes have type 1 diabetes , we wanted to spend a moment with you discussing the more wide-spread type 2 diabetes . With over a million new cases being diagnosed annually, what do you find is the number one misconception your patients have of this disease?
Dr. Katie: Too many of my patients are under the misconception that their diabetes is genetic and therefore permanent; that theres nothing they can do to improve their outcome. Many people too often say, My mom or dad had it, so I knew Id get it.
Dr. Katie: Like many disease processes, there is a genetic component, but genes merely show someones propensity towards health or illness they are not Tarot cards; they dont predict our future. Research shows us that genes can be turned on and off depending on our diet and lifestyle choices, so using genetics as a reason for having type 2 diabetes cripples the persons hope of turning their disease around.
Dr. Katie: With proper supplementation, dietary and lifestyle c Continue reading

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How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

In this article, we will take a look at the benefits of following a vegetarian diet if you have diabetes. Though we cannot recommend a drastic change in one’s diet, we will enumerate the benefits of following a vegetarian diet. Prior to making any major changes in your diet if you have diabetes, it is imperative that you check with your primary care provider, and registered dietician or Certified Diabetes Educator for their input and expertise.
Types of vegetarians
Vegan
A vegan is the strictest type of vegetarian. The vegan diet is referred to as a “total,” or “pure” vegetarian diet. People who are vegans do not eat any meat or animal products, including eggs and dairy products. This also includes fish and seafood. They are on a plant-based diet.
To get the protein needed daily on a vegan diet, a person with diabetes could eat soy based products such as tofu or soy milk, all sorts of vegetables, and a variety of beans and whole grains. This is important because proteins are the “building blocks,” and have important functions related to cell structure and function, and even to make the hormone insulin.
Because a vegan diet is low in vitamin B12, a multivitamin or supplement is usually recommended for a vegan diet. Ask your doctor before going on a vegan diet plan, and inquire about your vitamin B-12 needs while on a vegan diet.
Lacto-vegetarian
The lacto-vegetarian doesn’t eat meat or eggs. However, they don’t mind including milk products in their diet.
Lacto-ovo vegetarian
This group does not eat any meat, but they do enjoy animal products such as eggs an Continue reading

The Link Between Diabetes and Alcoholism

The Link Between Diabetes and Alcoholism


The connection between alcohol and health consequences is hardly a secret. While drinking in moderation may have some small benefits, drinking heavily does the opposite, threatening everything from organ function to life expectancy. Alcohol is damaging to the brain, the liver, blood pressure, and more, putting your entire body at risk for irreversible damage.
During the depths of addiction, many alcohol abusers assume these issues are overstated or wont happen to them. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth. A majority of alcoholics will eventually develop related complications, with almost all long-term binge drinkers experiencing liver disease and 35% of heavy drinkers eventually developing alcoholic hepatitis.
If the well-known consequences werent bad enough, new research indicates that alcoholism may be connected to yet another harmful condition: type 2 diabetes. Also known as adult-onset diabetes, this disease carries with it a significantly increased mortality rate , putting happiness and health at grave risk.
Diabetes refers to a group of diseases caused by too much sugar in the blood. In general, most patients have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, or juvenile diabetes, is a form in which your body does not make its own insulin. Instead, the immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, requiring the use of an artificial pump to supply the body with insulin. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90% to 95% of all diabetes cases , is an alternate form in which the body does not produce enough insulin or does Continue reading

Research shows the important role of gut bacteria in preventing and treating type 1 diabetes

Research shows the important role of gut bacteria in preventing and treating type 1 diabetes

Scientists have discovered new evidence of the importance of gut bacteria in terms of averting and treating conditions such as type 1 diabetes.
It is already known, namely that certain common variants of HLA/MHC genes protect against a range of autoimmune diseases, particularly type 1 diabetes. Yet how these genes and the tiny cell proteins they regulate yield their immune modulating effects has remained shrouded in mystery.
Now, a study in mice led by scientists at Harvard Medical School reveals that at least one of these genes has a protective influence that is powerfully shaped by the trillions of intestinal bacteria collectively known as the gut microbiota.
In the study, researchers worked with mice bred to spontaneously develop diabetes, the classic animal model for studying the disease. However, this particular group was also bred to carry a protective gene variant shown in earlier studies to ward off type 1 diabetes despite the animals’ heavy predisposition to the disease.
When treated with antibiotics in the first six weeks of life, mice went on to develop pancreatic inflammation, a precursor to type 1 diabetes, despite carrying the guardian gene. Treatment with antibiotics later in life, between six and 10 weeks after birth, did not lead to loss of protection against diabetes.
The observation suggests a period during which the new born gut is seeded by various germs, the researchers say. Interfering with that process by administering antibiotics appears to disrupt the balance of the gut microbiota, which in turn leads to loss of genetic protection, the researcher Continue reading

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes


Traveling makes diabetes management harder. Diabetes doesnt take a vacation just because you do. Here are some guidelines on traveling safely from experts and bloggers. (Many of these tips have to do with insulin, but not all.)
Get your supplies together. The travel insurance company Insurancewith says , Its often advised for [people with diabetes] to carry a pack in their hand luggage, with everything theyd need for the journey. This would include injection pens, insulin, sensors, pumps, and spare pump batteries. Insulin and blood sugar monitoring equipment and emergency snacks should always be readily available. If you check them in, you may not have them when you need them. Or they may end up lost.
Our blogger Amy Mercer found out about keeping supplies handy on a trip to the Bahamas. Changing planes in Atlanta, she wanted to eat, but she had no syringe for her insulin. She had used the one in her carrying case and forgotten to bring others in her carry-on luggage. Her sugar climbed to over 300 before the plane landed and she could get her insulin syringes back.
Insurancewith says bring twice as many supplies as you need. Double up on all of it. Your trip could run long, supplies could be damaged, or you could need more than usual because of the demands of traveling.
You should also consider bringing a back-up pump and monitoring equipment.
Kathleen Stanley, a certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian in Lexington, Kentucky, says If you take insulin with syringes, think about how youll carry and dispose of your syringes or pen needles.
Padded insulin t Continue reading

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