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A Day In The Life With Type 1Diabetes

A Day in the Life with Type 1Diabetes

A Day in the Life with Type 1Diabetes


Posted in Cost , Diabetes , Exercise , Food , Medical Supplies , Type 1 by Tracy Gnadinger
Halloween is a surreal holiday. Its my favorite holiday, but it is also a reminder of how much life with an incurable chronic condition affects my perception of positive childhood memories. Im lucky that I could grow up with trick or treating without Type 1 diabetes, but I am also cursed in that I will never relish in the same devilish appetite now that I have a disease that negates sugar.
So, it seems appropriate on this almost All Hallows Eve and in preparation for November National Diabetes Awareness Month that I should write about what its truly like to live a day in the life of someone with Type 1 diabetes. A few weeks ago, I took an ordinary Monday (well, as ordinary as a Monday can be) and tracked every time I thought about my diabetes every time I checked my blood sugar, every time I calculated carbohydrates for a meal, every time I felt something was off, and every time I administered insulin to keep my body alive.
Even I was amazed at how much managing diabetes has become a part of my everyday life. With advancements in technology, Im able to do more, and Im able to have more variety in the foods I eat. But that doesnt mean I dont think about it any less. That doesnt mean I can take a break from being there for my body.
So, heres one example of one day (because no day is the same) with Type 1 diabetes (there are no days off). Its a long one, so bear with (just keep in mind that this is really how much I think about diabetes on a daily basis believe me, it sucks).
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Type 2 Diabetes is the Perfect Disease

Type 2 Diabetes is the Perfect Disease


From the perspective of the healthcare industry, type 2 diabetes is the perfect disease. Unlike, say, pneumonia, which necessitates an antibiotic for 14 days and then its over, type 2 diabetes starts with one drug, then two, and then three or more, not to mention the drugs used for associated conditions, such as hypertension, heart disease, kidney disease, eye diseases, and accelerated dementia. And all of these drugs are prescribed for years, often a lifetime (albeit shortened compared to those without diabetes), resulting in a pharmaceutical bonanza of profit. To the drug industry, diabetes is the gift that keeps on giving.
Here are some sobering statistics: There are now 30 million people with type 2 diabetes in the United States, three times this number with prediabetes. Costs likewise are staggering: $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in reduced productivity every year. Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes adds, on average, $7,900 to an individuals annual healthcare costs. (Before they smartened up, annual reports of publicly traded pharmaceutical companies gushed over the surge in people with type 2 diabetes, hailing the epidemic as an unprecedented opportunity for revenue growth. They recognized recently that this could become a publicity faux pas and stopped using boastful wording.)
But there is a major oversight in all this: Type 2 diabetes is a disease of lifestyle and poor food choices and, to a lesser degree, inactivity, nutritional deficiencies, and other modern disruptions, made worse by the advice of agencies who pose as health advocates Continue reading

A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes

A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes


Home / Conditions / Type 1 Diabetes / A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes
A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes
The evolution of metformin therapy through the decades.
Studies such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and its Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) post-randomization follow-up have established that the risk of cardiovascular and microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes can be mitigated with stringent glucose control. However, maintaining blood glucose levels within goal range remains difficult for patients to achieve. The DCCT demonstrated that as HbA1c goals are approached the incidence of hypoglycemia increases exponentially. The risk and fear associated with hypoglycemia is a key factor in patient’s and practitioner’s difficulties in reaching target blood glucose levels. As such, healthcare providers err on the side of caution when setting goals for their patients.
Another issue facing patients with type 1 diabetes is the prevalence of insulin-induced weight gain and eventual insulin resistance and subsequent insulin dose requirement increases. Patients often experience increased blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol levels as consequence. Because of these challenges non-insulin therapies have emerged as possible solutions for patients with type 1 diabetes. Following the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) published in 1998 the world was introduced to metformin hydrochloride as a safe option for all type 2 diabetes patients and was no longer r Continue reading

children with DIABETES - Friends for Life Canada 2018

children with DIABETES - Friends for Life Canada 2018


November 2-4, 2018 Marriott on the Falls Niagara Falls, Ontario
The view of Niagara Falls is breathtaking
Learning about food has never been more fun
Even the youngest kids makes friends at FFL
Siblings (Orange Team) have a great time at FFL
Children with Diabetes (CWD) and Connected in Motion (CIM) present Friends for Life Canada, a conference for individuals and families living with type 1 diabetes! Join our group of world-renowned clinicians, researchers, physicians, adults, children, and families with diabetes to learn the most current information in diabetes care and support. Attend educational sessions and get cutting-edge diabetes management ideas. Participate in discussion groups, share your story, and help motivate and support others who walk in similar shoes. Watch toddlers and teens, college students and professionals, young parents and grandparents, new and practiced diabetes clinicians make new and lifelong friendships. This is a conference you won't ever forget!
Families and individuals with type 1 diabetes
Young adults, teens, school-age children, and younger children
Children with type 1 diabetes and their siblings and their best friends
Adults with type 1 diabetes and their spouses or partners
Friday, November 2, 2018: Registration and Exhibits Open, Grand Opening Reception in the Exhibit Area
Saturday, November 3, 2018: Sessions for adults and children all day, Exhibit Area open
Sunday, November 4, 2018: Sessions for adults and children all day
The Marriott on the Falls is the largest Marriott convention facility in Canada. It is located Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Can Wear You Down

Type 1 Diabetes Can Wear You Down


A diabetes advocate describes how the condition has impacted him throughout his life.
Editors note: We strive to provide a complete picture of life with Type 1 diabetes. While we love sharing inspirational stories, we want to make sure to acknowledge the difficulties of managing a chronic condition over decades. Aaron D. Johnson sent us this honest account, and we thank him for it.
The world of a child is an amazing place. Its a medley of bicycles, ballgames in the sun, building forts, sledding in the snow, birthday cakes and Christmas lights. What child is going to pay any attention to dry skin and constant thirst when there is so much to do? Childhood is a time to run and play, to get dirty, soaking wet, or covered with snow. The only need is to race home after school to catch a favorite TV show and then charge outside again to play superhero among your superhero friends.
Then, one day, you are just too tired to get up from in front of the television. Your tummy hurts and your dry skin is flushed. Your mother is talking to you, but you cant understand what she is saying. The bright, kaleidoscope of childhood is replaced with a blur of hospital images: doctors frowning with concern and talking in low, serious voices; nurses looking at you like you were the walking dead; endless medical tests; waiting rooms and gurneys behind curtains; and, of course, the needles. Always the needles.
I was six years old when I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. In my case, it is a form known as brittle diabetes, or Labile diabetes. This is a fairly rare form of diabetes that causes w Continue reading

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