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A Common Diabetes Drug Will Be Trialled As An Anti-Ageing Elixir From Next Year

A Common Diabetes Drug Will Be Trialled as an Anti-Ageing Elixir From Next Year

A Common Diabetes Drug Will Be Trialled as an Anti-Ageing Elixir From Next Year

We all want to live healthier for longer, but despite the increase in lifespans over the past century, at some point, age inevitably catches up with us and our cells begin to make mistakes, leading to a range of diseases such as cancer and dementia. But now researchers believe they might have found something that could slow down the ageing process entirely – a cheap diabetes drug that's already being taken by millions of people.
Known as metformin, the drug has been on the market for around 60 years. But the reason scientists are so interested in it now is that, over that time, researchers have observed that the drug appears to reduce the likelihood of age-related cancers. Studies have also shown that diabetics taking metformin live longer than people who don't have diabetes – despite the fact that the condition normally takes eight years off people's lives.
"People on metformin get 30 percent less cancers, almost every cancer except maybe prostate cancer. There are fewer studies, but there is a signal that metformin prevents cognitive decline," co-leader of the study Nir Barzilai, from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, told Andrea Alfano from Tech Times. "Additionally, there is a study that suggests that people on metformin who, when they start taking metformin, are more obese and sicker than people without diabetes, they outlive people without diabetes."
Based on these observations, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now green-lit the drug to be trialled for its anti-ageing properties as early as next year. And if it ends up being approved, it'll be the Continue reading

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Virgin Coconut Oil Effective in Treating Diabetes

Virgin Coconut Oil Effective in Treating Diabetes

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Editor, Health Impact News
Indeed Virgin Coconut Oil has a substantial effect on blood sugar levels. My wife and daughter (both have type 2 diabetes) measure their blood sugar levels at least three times a day. When they eat the wrong foods and their blood sugar levels get to 80-100 points above normal, they don’t take extra medication, they take 2-3 tablespoons of the coconut oil directly from the bottle. Within a half hour their blood sugar levels will come back to normal. Ed Coconut Diet Forums
25.8 million children and adults in the United States, 8.3% of the population, have diabetes.1 The current rate of people becoming diabetic in the United states is doubling every 10 years. This has resulted in a windfall for pharmaceutical companies capitalizing on this “disease” with drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes, but not deal with the underlying cause. These drugs have serious side effects.
One of the most popular diabetes drugs, Avandia, was pulled off the market in 2011 after a number of studies showed that the drug increased the risk of heart attacks among type 2 diabetes patients. The manufacturer of the drug reached a $3 billion settlement in December 2011 over its fraudulent marketing of the drug, the largest federal criminal drug-company settlement to date.
Information that is finally making its way into the mainstream media is that type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle and diet issue that can be reversed without drugs. This information has been known for years, however, among those in the alternative health crowd. Consider these testimonials (s Continue reading

Study Links Vaccine Induced Immune Overload to Autism, Diabetes, Obesity

Study Links Vaccine Induced Immune Overload to Autism, Diabetes, Obesity

A new vaccine study published in Molecular and Genetic Medicine is bringing to the forefront the disturbing connection between the dramatic expansion in the quantity of routine childhood vaccines administered and a corresponding increase in inflammation-associated disorders.
Titled, "Review of Vaccine Induced Immune Overload and the Resulting Epidemics of Type 1 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome, Emphasis on Explaining the Recent Accelerations in the Risk of Prediabetes and other Immune Mediated Diseases," the study argues that vaccine-induced immune overload is a driving factor in a number of rapidly accelerating childhood epidemics including:
Autism
Type 1 diabetes
Asthma
Food allergies
Many autoimmune diseases
Obesity
Type 2 diabetes
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL)
Metabolic disease.
The paper sought to provide a theory of vaccine induced immune overload to explain many observations about the changes in the epidemics. The fundamental problem, according to the study, is that vaccinology assumes a 'one size fits all' approach that results in the majority of the vaccine recipients having overstimulated immune systems:
"One major problem with vaccines is the concept of one size fits all. Package inserts of almost all vaccines recommend a dose based on age. In order for a vaccine to be a commercial success it is expected to induce a protective immune response in well over 90% of children. In order for this to happen a dose, based on age, must stimulate a protective immune response in those with the weakest immune system. In the process of doing this, the other 90% or m Continue reading

Diabetes and Swollen Feet

Diabetes and Swollen Feet

A common complication associated with diabetes is swollen feet. The swelling can come from a number of factors but the main concern is diabetic leg pain associated with neuropathy. Although its origin can be traced to several different factors, it is still a very serious condition which, left untreated, could result in irreparable nerve and blood vessel damage and even amputation.
It is a common known fact that diabetes can result in poor blood circulation. The problem is that the circulation appears in other parts of the body, as well. The reason that the legs are usually affected more is a decreased level of activity and prolonged sitting.
Another common occurrence is a pooling of blood in the lower extremities called peripheral vascular disease. This occurs when there is a thinning of the blood vessels or an obstruction of the large arteries of the legs. This, too, can be associated with being a complication of diabetes and a lack of exercise and mobility.
Poor circulation can also result in neuropathy, or nerve damage. This happens because blood is not flowing properly and the diminished blood supply eventually begins to take its toll. Once the nerves are subjected to extreme damage, they become damaged forever. Unfortunately, by the time pain is felt, some damage has usually already occurred. That’s why it is important that you contact your doctor immediately once you begin to experience tingling, pain, or numbness.
Properly managing your glucose is a good way to ward off leg pain. Exercising and eating right will also do wonders, as will drinking plenty of water and Continue reading

Lab-Grown Human Beta Cells Have Blocked Diabetes in Mice For Good

Lab-Grown Human Beta Cells Have Blocked Diabetes in Mice For Good

For the first time, researchers have converted induced pluripotent stem cells - cells capable of turning into any other type of cell - into fully functioning pancreatic beta cells, and when transplanted into diabetic mice, they blocked the disease altogether.
While the process has yet to be tested in humans, the results are exciting, because the hallmark of diabetes is a loss of functioning beta cells. If we can figure out how to transplant new, healthy beta cells into diabetes patients, we're looking at an actual cure, not just a treatment. "This discovery will enable us to produce potentially unlimited supplies of transplantable cells derived from a patient's own cells," lead researcher Ronald Evans told ABC News.
Diabetes, simply put, involves the loss of functioning beta cells in the pancreas: either these cells die (type I diabetes) or they don't do as they're told (type II diabetes), and in both cases, it leads to a lack of insulin to regulate the glucose levels in the blood. For a long time, scientists have been trying to replace these damaged or dead beta cells with healthy ones, and it finally looks as though they might have cracked it (in mice, at least).
When researchers at the Salk Institute in California transplanted these human beta cells into mice with type I diabetes, the diabetes symptoms disappeared. In this case, the scientists depressed the immune systems in the mice to prevent the human tissue from being rejected, but this would probably be unnecessary in human trials, if the beta cells could be developed from a patient's own stem cells.
The research bu Continue reading

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