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8 Low-Carb Veggies For A Diabetes-Friendly Diet

8 Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet

8 Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet

1 / 9 Best Low-Carb Veggies for a Diabetes-Friendly Diet
When you have type 2 diabetes, eating low-carb vegetables is a smart way to fill up without filling out your waistline — or spiking your blood sugar levels. Non-starchy or low-carbohydrate veggies are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber while still being low in calories. It’s always smart to eat a rainbow-colored diet, but the following veggies are among the best. Continue reading

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List of the Right Vegetables for Diabetes

List of the Right Vegetables for Diabetes

Vegetables add bright colors, flavors and textures to your diet. They are rich in vitamins, minerals, water, dietary fiber, phytochemicals and antioxidants and contribute to a healthy diet. Vegetables are generally low in calories and carbohydrates, making them an excellent option for diabetics. Vegetables fall into two groups: starchy and non-starchy. Starchy vegetables are higher in carbohydrates and raise blood glucose levels more easily. Non-starchy vegetables are the best choice for a diabetic meal plan.
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Rich in calcium, vitamins A, B, C and K, magnesium, iron, protein, potassium and dietary fiber, dark leafy greens are perfect for a diabetic diet. Leafy greens include spinach, kale, broccoli, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, arugula, mustard or collard greens, romaine lettuce and chard. Each of these vegetables contains approximately 5 g of carbohydrates per serving, with a serving equal to 1 cup raw or a ½ cup cooked vegetables. Eating a mixed green salad before or with your meal is a good way to incorporate leafy greens into your diabetic meal plan.
Tomatoes contain lycopene, a potent antioxidant known to help fight disease. Tomatoes are also rich in potassium, phosphorus, calcium, vitamin A, C and K, folate and dietary fiber. A ½ cup serving of tomatoes is equivalent to 4 g of carbohydrates. Eat them raw, pureed, stewed, juiced or in a sauce; all tomato-based products are low in carbohydrates. When purchasing tomato-based products, be sure to choose "no sugar added" or "low sodium" varieties.
Bell peppers are available in a rainbow of colors, includi Continue reading

Is watermelon a good fruit for people with diabetes?

Is watermelon a good fruit for people with diabetes?

Watermelon is a good fruit choice for people with diabetes, but many people mistakenly think that it is not. The reason has to do with the difference between glycemic index and its glycemic load.
The Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of the effects of carbohydrates on blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion, releasing glucose rapidly into the bloodstream (like those found in white bread), have a “high GI” (70 or higher); carbohydrates that break down slowly, releasing glucose gradually into the bloodstream (like those in whole grains and legumes), have a “low GI” (55 or lower).
The Glycemic Load (GL) is a ranking system for the glycemic impact of foods, based on their carbohydrate content, portion size, and Glycemic Index. Low = 1 to 10; Medium = 11-19; High = 20 or higher.
As explained in the book The New Glucose Revolution for Diabetes (Marlowe, 2007), the GL was developed by Harvard researchers, who posited that eating a small amount of a high-GI food would have the same effect on blood sugar as would eating large amounts of a low-GI food. Another issue with looking only at the GI of a food is that it’s tied to the number of grams of carbohydrates in that food and, obviously, that number varies by large amounts. Watermelon is a good illustration of this problem. Watermelon’s GI is high, 72. The GI, however, is based not on a normal portion, but on 50g of carbohydrates — whatever the food. To get 50g of watermelon carbs, you’d have to eat almost 5 cups. GL combines both the quality and the quantity of the actual carbohyd Continue reading

Potatoes 'pose pregnancy diabetes risk'

Potatoes 'pose pregnancy diabetes risk'

Eating potatoes or chips on most days of the week may increase a woman's risk of diabetes during pregnancy, say US researchers.
This is probably because starch in spuds can trigger a sharp rise in blood sugar levels, they say.
Their study in the BMJ tracked more than 21,000 pregnancies.
But UK experts say proof is lacking and lots of people need to eat more starchy foods for fibre, as well as fresh fruit and veg.
The BMJ study linked high potato consumption to a higher diabetes risk.
Swapping a couple of servings a week for other vegetables should counter this, say the authors.
UK dietary advice says starchy foods (carbohydrates) such as potatoes should make up about a third of the food people eat.
There is no official limit on how much carbohydrate people should consume each week.
Starchy carbs
Foods that contain carbohydrates affect blood sugar.
Some - high Glycaemic Index (GI) foods - release the sugar quickly into the bloodstream.
Others - low GI foods - release them more steadily.
Research suggests eating a low GI diet can help manage diabetes.
Pregnancy puts extra demands on the body, and some women develop diabetes at this time.
Gestational diabetes, as it is called, usually goes away after the birth but can pose long-term health risks for the mother and baby.
The BMJ study set out investigate what might make some women more prone to pregnancy diabetes.
The study followed nurses who became pregnant between 1991 and 2001. None of them had any chronic diseases before pregnancy.
What is gestational diabetes mellitus?
It is a condition where there is too much glucose (su Continue reading

What Candy Can People With Diabetes Eat and How Much Is Safe?

What Candy Can People With Diabetes Eat and How Much Is Safe?

Think candy is off-limits simply because you have diabetes? Not a chance! “I encourage people with diabetes to remember that a diabetes diet is really just a healthier diet,” says Rainie Carter, RD, CDE, who is in private practice in Birmingham, Alabama. She suggests thinking of candy as a dessert, versus a snack. “Changing that mentality allows people to think about eating candy in smaller portions. We are typically fuller from the meal and therefore eat less candy or sweets than we would have before.”
And you don’t necessarily need to reach for a sugar-free version, which can contain tummy-upsetting sugar alcohols. “Our bodies need carbohydrates throughout the day — and candy can be a delicious, festive, enjoyable source of it on occasion,” says Meg Salvia, RDN, CDE, the owner of Meg Salvia Nutrition in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Just eat the candy in moderation: The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting added sugars, the type of sugar present in candy bars, to less than 10 percent of daily calories. So if you’re having 2,000 calories a day, that would be no more than 200 calories from added sugar (about two fun-size packs of peanut M&M’s). And people with diabetes have other considerations, too — more on those next.
Next time you come across fun-size candy — whether it’s because you bought it yourself, you’re digging through your child’s trick-or-treat bag, you’re hosting a birthday party with a piñata, or you’re rummaging through the office candy bowl — here’s what you need to know about making the best can Continue reading

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