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7 Ways To Stop The Progression Of Prediabetes Into Diabetes

7 Ways to Stop the Progression of Prediabetes into Diabetes

7 Ways to Stop the Progression of Prediabetes into Diabetes

Not only is diabetes a huge health threat, but millions of Americans are already struggling with the condition also.
But prediabetes is something that people sadly take for granted.
Not only is it a sign of diabetes development, but it is also a sign that you can help your system to prevent actually getting diabetes.
An estimated number of 37 million Americans experience symptoms of prediabetes.
A more alarming number is the number 87, which indicates the 86 million of Americans that have a prediabetes diagnosis already.
A number of 471 million people globally is the expected estimate of people with prediabetes by 2035.
What Is Prediabetes?
Prediabetes is the condition that has an elevated blood sugar level, and the percentage is right under the scale of the diagnosis for diabetes.
Basically, before a person develops diabetes type II, they become prediabetic.
Having prediabetes puts you at a risk a lot higher than normal people for developing cardiovascular diseases, as well as diabetes type II.
Even though there are rare and clear symptoms of prediabetes, if you get checked, and your levels are the following:
Fasting blood glucose: 100 to 125 mg/dl
A two-hour blood glucose: 140 mg/dl – 199 mg/dl
A1C: 5.7% – 6.4%
You unfortunately most likely have prediabetes.
However, some cases experience diabetic symptoms, but are actually prediabetic.
Feeling abnormally thirsty, abnormally urinating, and feeling fatigues are some of the symptoms prediabetics also might experience.
Prediabetes Risk-Factors
The older you get, the risk of developing prediabetes gets higher and higher.
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The Connection Between Diabetes and Depression We Have to Talk About

The Connection Between Diabetes and Depression We Have to Talk About

Depression: another big D word and largely silent, invisible illness. Standing alone it can be emotionally devastating and incredibly difficult to cope with. Add diabetes, and depression is often given further means to fester and grow quite dramatically, with stable blood sugar control often overlooked or given less attention than it needs to have. Most recent studies show that depression is twice more commonly found in individuals that have diabetes than those without.
But why? And how do we address it? Uncontrolled diabetes can be problematic enough to treat, especially with many health practitioners not addressing the emotional roots of the diagnosis at all. With depression thrown into the mix the proactive approach a person with diabetes needs to take can fall easily by the wayside, with self-care becoming a burden. Of course, such despondency can often be a part of someone experiencing diabetes with an eating disorder as well. Depression, diabetes and an eating disorder make up a dangerous mix whereby each condition can be fueled by the others, maintaining a cycle that is difficult to break out of.
Despite the high numbers of people with diabetes who also experience depression, any information available upon diagnosis is sorely lacking. You are typically given all the education that you need in relation to what insulin to take, what to do in cases of hypo or hyperglycaemia and which snacks are better than others, but what about the emotional issues? It seems quite rare that any insight or support is provided to acknowledge what coping with diabetes can do to your head. Continue reading

Antibiotic abuse is on track to kill more people than cancer and diabetes. Can food help?

Antibiotic abuse is on track to kill more people than cancer and diabetes. Can food help?

England’s Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies recently made headlines around the world when she again warned of an impending “post-antibiotic apocalypse.” Sounding no less disastrous, the World Health Organization has said that we’re “heading towards a post-antibiotic era, in which many common infections will no longer have a cure and [will] once again kill unabated.” How have we arrived here? And how can we protect ourselves while researchers race to find alternatives to antibiotics and new classes of bacteria-busting drugs?
For nearly a century, antibiotics have been overprescribed, under-regulated and misunderstood. Because of all the good they have done treating infectious diseases around the world, we, as doctors and as a society at-large, became excessively reliant on them to treat everything from acne to tuberculosis, pneumonia to urinary tract infections (UTIs) to gonorrhea. Antibiotics are also widely used for preterm babies and to support the immune system before and after surgeries, cancer treatments and organ transplants. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is nothing new—the father of antibiotics, Sir Walter Fleming, even warned of it in his Nobel Prize winner’s lecture—but it is accelerating. And while scientists were once constantly introducing new antibiotics to replace the ineffective ones, we are now decades behind in discovering and deploying new antibiotics.
In the meantime, more deadly bacteria grow resistant to the available antibiotics. “Nightmare bacteria” or “superbugs” have emerged, with a major report by economist Jim O’ Continue reading

Combination of diabetes and heart disease substantially reduces life expectancy

Combination of diabetes and heart disease substantially reduces life expectancy

Life expectancy for people with a history of both cardiovascular disease and diabetes is substantially lower than for people with just one condition or no disease, a new study harnessing the power of ‘big data’ has concluded.
Our results highlight the importance of preventing heart disease and stroke amongst patients with diabetes, and likewise averting diabetes amongst heart disease patients
Researchers at the University of Cambridge analysed more than 135,000 deaths which occurred during prolonged follow-up of almost 1.2 million participants in population cohorts. They used this to provide estimates of reductions in life expectancy associated with a history of different combinations of diabetes, stroke, and/or myocardial infarction heart attack – so-called cardiometabolic diseases. Their results are published today in JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association).
The team analysed data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (ERFC) from almost 700,000 participants recruited between 1960 and 2007, taken from a total of 91 prospective cohorts that have recorded mortality during prolonged follow-up. They compared the results with those from the UK Biobank, a prospective cohort of just under 500,000 participants recruited between 2006 and 2010.
Previous studies have estimated that around 10 million adults in the United States and the European Union are living with more than one cardiometabolic illness. In this new study, the researchers found that around one person in a hundred from the cohorts they analysed had two or more conditions.
“We showed that h Continue reading

Does the drug that ‘fixed’ my diabetes have a dark side?

Does the drug that ‘fixed’ my diabetes have a dark side?

A while back, I wrote about how dapagliflozin revolutionised my glucose control. Almost overnight, I changed from a morbid and morbidly obese failing diabetic to a nearly new fifty-something with a rejuvenated lust for life. My HbA1c returned to normal levels and my retinopathy disappeared. I was advised to stop taking gliclazide as my glucose control seemed to be perfect, and I didn’t want to experience hypoglycaemia. I even stopped pricking my finger to measure my blood sugar. I felt my diabetes was behind me.
I had also discovered a low-carb diet I could live with: bacon and eggs, kebabs, lamb chops and steaks with mustard, hummus and delicious cheeses, all accompanied by lots of salads in mayonnaise, and non-starchy veggies. Yumm! I lost three stone effortlessly. It became embarrassing how many people remarked on how well I looked, having been a sickly fat blighter for all the time before.
I felt strong enough to take on a big project helping to plan and implement the regeneration of healthcare in my very rural locale. It involved lots of travelling to meet the public and speak frankly to them while thinking on my feet. I attended endless meetings and video conferences where I had to learn the tiresome new lingo of management-speak. All of this was done alongside my day and night job as a resident consultant in intensive care and anaesthesia.
Before even six months were up, I began to feel a bit flakey. My memory and concentration were not good. I was having difficulty keeping up with the meetings. I was prone to emotional lability, most noticeably at home, and, most Continue reading

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