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6 Things We Now Know About Gestational Diabetes

6 Things We Now Know About Gestational Diabetes

6 Things We Now Know About Gestational Diabetes

It affects nearly one in 10 pregnancies—even if the mother-to-be didn't have diabetes before she conceived. Two experts on the condition share what you should know to help keep you and your baby healthy.
Chances are you probably know someone who has diabetes, but did you know that there’s a form of the disease that develops only during pregnancy—in women who’ve never had it before?
It’s called gestational diabetes, and it occurs in up to 9% of all pregnancies, according to a 2014 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Gestational diabetes can result from the fact that the body may use insulin less efficiently while growing a baby, causing your blood glucose levels to rise—a condition known as hyperglycemia, which can cause health problems for both the mother-to-be and her developing baby.
“Any pregnant woman can develop gestational diabetes,” says Amparo Gonzalez, CDE, RN, MPH, Global Senior Director for the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute (JJDI) and a Fellow of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. “Properly treating it is essential for maintaining both the mother’s and the baby’s health.”
Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes may seem overwhelming at first, especially if you've had an otherwise healthy pregnancy. But the more you can educate yourself about what you can do to maintain healthy blood glucose levels during your pregnancy, the more manageable and treatable the condition can be.
That's why we've interviewed leading experts on gestational diabetes to share the latest information on the condition tha Continue reading

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Flu shot key for people with diabetes

Flu shot key for people with diabetes

(HealthDay)—With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people—particularly those with diabetes—to get vaccinated.
Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained.
However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications.
"Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health."
Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted.
There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include:
Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition.
Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more lik Continue reading

Doctors' Notes: Researchers link hotter weather to gestational diabetes

Doctors' Notes: Researchers link hotter weather to gestational diabetes

There’s a little-known factor that influences whether pregnant women develop gestational diabetes — body temperature.
In my work as an endocrinologist and diabetes researcher, I investigate how our environment can increase a person’s risk of developing diabetes.
Recently, my team and I looked at all of the hospital births in the Greater Toronto Area — more than 55,000 in all — over 12 years to see what kind of impact temperatures might have on the risk of gestational diabetes (known as GDM), a temporary condition that can develop during pregnancy.
We found a relationship between cold weather and a lower likelihood of GDM. When the mercury dropped to an average temperature of minus 10 degrees Celsius, the rate of GDM was 4.6 per cent. But at 24 degrees Celsius, the rate rose to 7.7 per cent. And for every 10-degree rise, there were further increases of up to 9 per cent — even when accounting for other risk factors.
Whether the women themselves were born in warm or cool climates, our research team found that colder temperatures still appear to offer some protective benefit to the mothers. Our findings also applied to women who had one child as well as to moms who had multiple children throughout the study’s duration.
More research is needed to better understand the links between temperature and GDM risk, but our findings may have implications for prevention and treatment of the disease. Simple measures like making use of air conditioning and not overdressing in hot weather or keeping the thermostat lower and getting outside in colder weather might help.
We need Continue reading

How to prevent diabetes with everyday foods

How to prevent diabetes with everyday foods

(NaturalNews) According to the most recent statistics, about one-third of the entire U.S. population, or more than 100 million Americans, suffers from either diabetes or pre-diabetes, a blood sugar condition that can eventually lead to more serious health conditions and even death. And based on U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) projections, this number is expected to double by 2050 if trends continue at current rates. But you and your family do not have to fall victim to this sweeping diabetes epidemic -- here are some tips on how to alter your diet and lifestyle to avoid developing diabetes and potentially succumbing to premature death:
1) Eat more foods rich in quercetin. A member of the flavonoid family of antioxidants, quercetin has been shown to help lower blood glucose levels and improve plasma insulin levels, two factors commonly associated with diabetes (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19496084). Quercetin also helps neutralize damaging free radicals and inhibit inflammation, not to mention lower blood pressure in people with inflammation (http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/quercetin-000322.htm).
Foods that are high in quercetin include apples, citrus fruits, onions, parsley, sage, green tea, and red wine. Olive oil, grapes, dark cherries, and dark berries are also rick in quercetin and other flavonoids, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). And if dietary sources are not enough, quercetin is also available in supplement form, including in the Rejuvenate! Plus green superfood formula available at the NaturalNews store Continue reading

Diabetes and Driver's License Restrictions?

Diabetes and Driver's License Restrictions?

Have you ever wondered what the exact rules are, when it comes to diabetes and driver's license restrictions? We sure do, every time news stories pop up about unsafe driving involving PWDs (people with diabetes).
We looked into this, and essentially learned that state laws differ; a comprehensive review by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) a few years ago shows that roughly half the states at the time had no required restrictions, while the other half had restrictions that were enacted into law.
Questioning Myself
Before we get into the specific laws, I'd like to share the fact that twice in my own life, I've gone low while driving and experienced dangerous scares that made me question whether I should even have a license and be on the road at all.
The first was in my late teens not long after my high school graduation in 1997, long before I became an insulin pumper. I ended up swerving on the road and eventually getting pulled over by police in a parking lot. Thankfully, no accident occurred and no one was hurt.
The second incident was about a decade ago, still before my CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) days. As a result of a fast-dropping blood sugar that didn't show itself with an in-the-moment fingerstick at work, I had a "sudden" hypo that led me wandering from my office in a daze into the parking garage. I apparently climbed into my my red Ford Escape and began driving towards home. I ended up in front of my subdivision in a ditch, after taking out a street sign with my car. Luckily (incredibly so!), no one was injured that time either. The latter inspired me Continue reading

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