diabetestalk.net

5 Steps For Managing Diabetes On Campus

5 Steps for Managing Diabetes on Campus

5 Steps for Managing Diabetes on Campus


Tips for making college a safe and healthy home away from home
Well before you get to college, find a diabetes care team near campus. Your current pediatrician or endocrinologist may know of nearby doctors, nurses, and diabetes educators. Or reach out to your local American Diabetes Association office for referrals, says Paul Madden, MEd, the Associations director of type1 and type2 diabetes programs.
Plan to get to know the folks at your campus health centerand make sure they get to know you, Madden says. Students, not their parents, should call ahead of their move to introduce themselves as someone with diabetes. Then, within a couple days of school starting, visit the health center and share information about your diabetes, such as medication and insulin dosages, and perhaps bring backup insulin vials or pens to store there. This serves two purposes, Madden says: If you run low on insulin in your dorm room, it may be easier to walk to the health center than get to a pharmacy. It also makes you a familiar face with your care team on campus.
The people you live withroommates, resident advisers, and resident directorsshould know you have diabetes, says Christina Roth, CEO and founder of the College Diabetes Network, an online and in-person network of college students and alumni with diabetes.
Its wise to teach your roommates to administer glucagon in an emergency. Alternatively, Madden suggests telling them, If I cant safely drink something sweetnot alcohol!please call the health center or 911. Help them understand (and remember) by printing and distributing diabetes Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes

New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes


New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes
New clinical trial could offer a functional cure for people with type 1 diabetes
The ViaCyte trial is being run at three sites in North America, including University of Minnesota Health.
Greg Romero (right) has to live with his type 1 diabetes all day, every day. But a new clinical trial offered through University of Minnesota Health could give him a functional cure for his disease.
Greg Romero cant run or hide from his type 1 diabetes .
Its the main priority I have, taking care of this disease, he said. Every minute of every day.
Romero has been diabetic since he was 11 years old, but in the past several years his disease has become more complicated. Hes developed hypoglycemia unawareness, which means hes not able to feel when his blood glucose drops to dangerously low levels. Even with new technology that routinely provides him insulin and monitors his blood glucose levels, managing his disease is an ever-present responsibility.
Now, theres a sign of hope. Romero is one of a handful of people in the world participating in a new clinical trial thats studying whether pancreatic progenitor cells, transplanted into a person with type 1 diabetes, can become cells that produce insulin naturallyeffectively curing the disease. Developed by ViaCyte, the trial is available at three sites in North America, including University of Minnesota Health.
Learn more about University of Minnesota Health diabetes care.
These pancreatic progenitor cells are a renewable resource. A single progenitor cell Continue reading

Diabetes: How to spot the signs before it’s too late

Diabetes: How to spot the signs before it’s too late

Sometimes the hustle and bustle of life distract us so much that we can’t see the signs our bodies give us about the condition of our health, especially with diseases like diabetes at an all-time high in this country. I know this to be true because there have been times that I’ve worn myself down by ignoring what my body was trying to tell me and I’d become sick for weeks at a time. In the midst of getting things done and being a “boss” too many people let their health decline; sometimes to the point of no return.
I have been dealing with a diabetic mother for a long time now. There are good days and not so good days. I can gauge the seriousness of her condition daily based on the signs, but it was not always like that. When she was first diagnosed with the autoimmune disease (type 2 diabetes) about 12 years ago, there were a lot of scary trips to the hospital and a lot of days not knowing what to expect next. Take it from me that it’s true you become a kind of “expert” about a disease when faced with it personally. That’s why knowing what to look for is so important. It can literally be the difference between life and death.
So here are some tips on knowing the signs of type 2 diabetes so that you can better manage, maintain and deal with it.
Know Your Family History
This is a key component of knowing the signs. Due to genes, people are predisposed for certain types of diseases, just like they can be predisposed for certain body types. Having an understanding of where the disease falls in your family, if at all, is a great start because it will give you a Continue reading

10 diabetes superfoods

10 diabetes superfoods


People whose diets include large amounts of nuts put on less weight than those that do not. Weight loss can help to reduce blood sugars.
Add crushed walnuts to yogurt, oats, or salad.
Make a trail mix treat with walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and dark chocolate chips.
Avocados are a good source of healthy fats and vitamins.
The avocado is the only fruit that is a good source of healthy fat. Avocados also provide about 20 different vitamins and minerals, and are especially high in potassium , vitamins C, E, and K, lutein, and beta-carotene .
Eating foods that contain healthy fats may help increase fullness. Eating fat slows the digestion of carbohydrates, which helps to keep blood sugar levels more stable.
Avocado is high in fiber too, with half a fruit containing 6-7 grams. According to the Department of Internal Medicine and Nutritional Sciences Program of the University of Kentucky, high fiber intake is associated with a significantly lower risk for diabetes .
Eating high-fiber foods can also reduce blood pressure and cholesterol levels, improve weight loss, and make insulin more efficient.
Spread avocado on toast in the morning instead of butter.
Use avocado instead of mayonnaise in chicken or egg salad.
Ezekiel bread is one of the healthiest types of bread as it contains less processed ingredients.
Ezekiel bread and other sprouted grain breads are less processed than standard white and whole wheat bread.
The grains in Ezekiel bread are soaked and sprouted, allowing for higher protein and nutrient content.
Bread made from sprouted grains tends to contain more B v Continue reading

The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus

The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus


The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus
We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in.
The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders.
Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient.
The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus
Khanh vinh quoc Luong and Lan Thi Hoang Nguyen
Thiamine acts as a coenzyme for transketolase (Tk) and for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and -ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, enzymes which play a fundamental role for intracellular glucose metabolism. The relationship between thiamine and diabetes mellitus (DM) has been reported in the literature. Thiamine levels and thiamine-dependent enzyme activities have been reduced in DM. Genetic studies provide opportunity to link the relationship between thiamine and DM (such as Tk, SLC19A2 gene, transcription factor Sp1, -1-antitrypsin, and p53). Thiamine and its derivatives have been demonstrated to prevent the activation of the biochemical pathways (increased flux through the polyol pathway, formation of advanced glycation end-products, activation of protein kinase C, and increased flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway) induced by hyperglycemia in DM.Thiamine definitively has a role in the diabetic endothelial vascular diseases (micro and macroangiopathy), lipid p Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles