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5 Important Steps For Type 2 Diabetes Foot Care

5 Important Steps for Type 2 Diabetes Foot Care

5 Important Steps for Type 2 Diabetes Foot Care

Good foot care is very important when you have type 2 diabetes. Your feet can be where long-term complications of diabetes cause problems. One of the dangerous complications is neuropathy , nerve damage which in turn causes numbness and tingling in your feet. Because the nerve is damaged, you may not be able to feel a cut or sore on your foot. If you aren't looking for signs of foot problems you may not notice it in time to treat it early. This can increase your risk for infections in your feet.
Because there is decreased circulation with neuropathy, infections can be very difficult to treat. Gangrene is a very serious complication of infection. It causes the death of the infected tissue which can lead to amputation.
To keep your feet healthy, these five steps are critically important when you have type 2 diabetes.
Since neuropathy can make it difficult to feel injuries and sores to your feet, it's imperative to check your feet every day. Give them a close inspection in the morning before you put your socks and shoes on. Look closely at any possible wear spots like the backs of heels and sides of feet. Carefully check between your toes and the entire bottom surface of your feet. If it's difficult for you to see the bottom of your feet, use a mirror or have a family member check them for you.
Make sure to wash your feet daily with soap and water and dry them thoroughly. A daily cleaning can help you detect trouble spots before they turn serious. Keeping your feet clean will wash away any small irritants or debris that might have been picked up on the soles of your feet. It's Continue reading

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The Cost of Diabetes: Diabetes Blog Week 2017 // Day 2

The Cost of Diabetes: Diabetes Blog Week 2017 // Day 2

It’s been almost two years and my heart still aches for a person I never actually got to meet.
I met Ish online in a Facebook group for people struggling with diabulimia. Immediately, I was attracted to her quick wit, irreverent sense of humor, and beautiful blue eyes. This girl was the definition of a spitfire but in the absolute best way imaginable. I respected her honesty and treasured her ability to lighten the mood with a single quip or clever remark. I’ve never met anyone quite like her and I honestly doubt I ever will.
Within the diabulimia community, there were several girls, including myself, who hit it off seemingly instantaneously in a special way. I’m not exactly sure how to pinpoint the manifestation of this particular friend group but I do remember realizing that I had found that sense of belonging I had been so long searching for. With a mutual appreciation for all things Harry Potter and Mean Girls related, it wasn’t long before we had a nice little circle of ladies all looking out for each other. It became more than just about diabetes or our similar struggles with disordered eating behavior patterns. We talked about our dreams, our fears, our families, and our relationships. Our lives became entangled and it was that common experience of struggling that solidified the bonds we shared. Even within that group of girls, I felt a particular kinship to Ish. We were absolutely meant to be friends despite our geographical limitations and we often romanticized about meeting up someday.
Hailing from Scotland, the land of my ancestral roots, I felt pulled to Continue reading

Employment and Type 1 Diabetes

Employment and Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here.
The Dos and Don’ts of Employers
As a person with Type 1, you are protected under several laws in the United States from discrimination on the job. It is important to get a clear overview of how you are protected so that you can make sure you are being treated fairly and equally. Here is a breakdown of how you are protected:
An employer is not allowed to do the following actions:
Fail to hire or promote you because of your Type 1
Terminate you because of your Type 1 (unless you pose a “direct threat”)
An employer must to the following actions:
Provide you with reasonable accommodations that help you perform the essential functions of your job
Not discriminate with regard to employer-provided health insurance
Interviews: Is it better to disclose?
There’s no law that requires you to disclose your diabetes, and employers aren’t allowed to ask about your medical background before offering you a job. Even if you choose to disclose your diabetes to your employer, your employer is required to keep that information confidential. Some job offers may depend on your ability to pass a medical evaluation after the initial offer, such as police officers or firefighters. However, these results will only affect your offer if they prevent you from doing your job or put your coworkers at risk.
Whether or not you talk about your diabetes is up to you. However, if your employer doesn’t know about your diabetes, you Continue reading

How to lose weight and prevent diabetes in 6 minutes a week

How to lose weight and prevent diabetes in 6 minutes a week

I believe regular movement and exercise is essential to health. As Stephan Guyenet pointed out in a recent blog post, our paleolithic ancestors had a different word for exercise: “life“. They naturally spent a lot of time outdoors in the sun, walking, hunting, gathering, and performing various other physically-oriented tasks. They had no concept of this as “exercise” or “working out”. It was just life.
But while exercise contributes to health in several different ways, it’s not very effective for weight loss. Or, more specifically, I should say that low-intensity, “cardio” – which is how most people exercise – is not effective for weight loss.
Why cardio doesn’t work
How could this be? There are three main reasons:
caloric burn during exercise is generally small;
people who exercise more also tend to eat more (which negates the weight regulating effect of exercise); and,
increasing specific periods of exercise may cause people to become more sedentary otherwise.
In an example of the first reason, a study following women over a one-year period found that in order to lose one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of fat, they had to exercise for an average of 77 hours. That’s a lot of time on the treadmill just to lose 2 pounds!
In an example of the second reason, a study found that people who exercise tend to eat more afterwards, and that they tend to crave high-calorie foods. The title of this study says it all: “Acute compensatory eating following exercise is associated with implicit hedonic wanting for food.” I love it when researchers have a sense of humor. Continue reading

Omega-6 could lower type 2 diabetes risk by 35 percent

Omega-6 could lower type 2 diabetes risk by 35 percent

Eating a diet rich in omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than a third, a new review concludes.
From an analysis of almost 40,000 adults across 20 studies, researchers found that people who had higher blood levels of linoleic acid — a main form of omega-6 — were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with lower levels of the fatty acid.
Study co-author Dr. Jason Wu, of the George Institute for Global Health in Australia, and colleagues recently reported their findings in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.
Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is no longer able to effectively use insulin — the hormone that regulates blood glucose — or when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. As a result, blood glucose levels become too high.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes, and the majority of cases are type 2.
Following a healthful diet is deemed one of the best ways to prevent type 2 diabetes.
Polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) such as omega-3 and omega-6 should form a part of a healthful diet, albeit in moderation. The new review, however, suggests that we might want to consider increasing our intake of omega-6 to protect against type 2 diabetes.
Omega-6: A help or hindrance?
Omega-6 fatty acids are considered to be essential for health; not only do they aid brain function, but they also play an important role in skin and hair growth, and they help to regulate metabolism and support bone health.
However, since the body is Continue reading

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