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25 Facts To Know On Exercise On Type 1 Diabetes

25 Facts to Know on Exercise on Type 1 Diabetes

25 Facts to Know on Exercise on Type 1 Diabetes

This past month, researchers from more than a dozen leading diabetes and exercise research teams published guidelines on how to exercise with Type 1 diabetes. These guidelines, published in the Lancet, represent the current international consensus of the best methods for maintaining blood sugar control with exercise.
From the report, we’ve pulled out 25 important findings:
Why You Really Should Exercise
1. Some 60 percent of people with Type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese
2. Some 40 percent of people with Type 1 have hypertension, and 60 percent have dyslipidemia, a condition which increases the chance of clogged arteries, heart attacks, and strokes.
Read “JDRF Rolls Out its PEAK Program on Exercise and Type 1.”
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3. Children and young people with Type 1 all see improved cardiorespiratory fitness and blood lipid levels with regular physical activity.
4. Adults with Type 1 diabetes who are physically active had lower rates of retinopathy
Read “5 Tips for Exercise and Type 1.”
5. Regular exercise decreases total daily insulin needs.
How Much Exercise Should You Do
6. Adults with diabetes should aim for a total of 150 minutes of accumulated physical activity each week.
7. Resistance exercise is recommended two to three times a week.
What Happens to Your Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise
8. During aerobic exercise, insulin secretion decreases and glucagon secretion increases.
9. During anaerobic activities and high-intensity interval training, circulating insulin levels do not decrease as much as they do in aerobic activities.
10. Trained athletes with Type Continue reading

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Slideshow: Diabetes and Your Mouth

Slideshow: Diabetes and Your Mouth

4 Signs You May Have a Problem
Diabetes puts you at risk for dental problems. It hurts your ability to fight bacteria in your mouth. Having high blood sugar encourages bacteria to grow and contributes to gum disease. You may have gum disease if you have:
Gums that are red, sore, bleeding, or swollen, or that pull away from your teeth
Loose teeth
Chronic bad breath
An irregular bite or dentures that don't fit well
Well-controlled diabetes helps keep your mouth healthy. If you have poorly controlled or high blood sugar, you have a higher chance of dry mouth, gum disease, tooth loss, and fungal infections like thrush. Since infections can also make your blood sugar rise, your diabetes may become harder to control. Keeping your mouth healthy can help you manage your blood sugar.
People with diabetes are more likely to have oral infections. You should get dental checkups at least twice a year. Let your dentist know you have diabetes and what medicines you take. Regular checkups and professional cleanings can help keep a mouth healthy. And your dentist can teach you the best ways to care for your teeth and gums at home.
Sticky plaque -- food, saliva, and bacteria -- starts to form on your teeth after you eat, releasing acids that attack tooth enamel. Untreated plaque turns into tartar, which builds under gum lines and is hard to remove with flossing. The longer it stays on your teeth, the more harmful it is. Bacteria in plaque causes inflammation and leads to gum disease. High blood sugar can make gum disease worse.
When you brush your teeth twice a day, it not only keeps your br Continue reading

A Patent Was Just Granted To What Could Be A Potential Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

A Patent Was Just Granted To What Could Be A Potential Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Type I diabetes is a chronic condition which usually develops in childhood. Otherwise known as juvenile diabetes, it occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone which allows sugar (glucose) to enter the cells to produce energy. Type I diabetes differs significantly from the increasingly common type II diabetes, which used to be known as adult onset diabetes, occurring when the body becomes resistant to or fails to produce enough insulin.
While research suggests that type II diabetes may be reversible through dietary changes, type I still has researchers confounded. As Science Alert explains, diabetes “involves the loss of functioning beta cells in the pancreas: either these cells die (type I diabetes) or they don’t do as they’re told (type II diabetes)” and while “scientists have been trying to replace these damaged or dead beta cells with healthy ones,” those cells are always destroyed by the patient’s own immune system.
There Is Hope
Fortunately a US patent has just been approved for what could be the first functional cure for type I diabetes. This involves combining cells that deliver insulin with a technology that allows them to hide from the immune system – for years at a time. Called ‘Melligan cells,’ they can produce, store, and release insulin according to the levels of human blood sugars.
Scientists from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have been genetically engineering these cells over the past several years to function in the same way that beta cells would in non-diabetics, releasing insulin in response to blood Continue reading

Foods to Avoid to Help Prevent Diabetes

Foods to Avoid to Help Prevent Diabetes

We’ve known that being overweight and obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but, until recently, not much attention has been paid to the role of specific foods. I discuss this issue in my video, Why Is Meat a Risk Factor for Diabetes?
A 2013 meta-analysis of all the cohorts looking at the connection between meat and diabetes found a significantly higher risk associated with total meat consumption––especially consumption of processed meat, particularly poultry. But why? There’s a whole list of potential culprits in meat: saturated fat, animal fat, trans fats naturally found in meat, cholesterol, or animal protein. It could be the heme iron found in meat, which can lead to free radicals and iron-induced oxidative stress that may lead to chronic inflammation and type 2 diabetes, or advanced glycation end (AGE) products, which promote oxidative stress and inflammation. Food analyses show that the highest levels of these so-called glycotoxins are found in meat—particularly roasted, fried, or broiled meat, though any foods from animal sources (and even high fat and protein plant foods such as nuts) exposed to high dry temperatures can be potent sources of these pro-oxidant chemicals.
In another study, researchers fed diabetics glycotoxin-packed foods, like chicken, fish, and eggs, and their inflammatory markers––tumor necrosis factor, C-reactive protein, and vascular adhesion molecules––shot up. “Thus, in diabetes, environmental (dietary) AGEs promote inflammatory mediators, leading to tissue injury.” The good news is that restriction of thes Continue reading

New hope for human patients as scientists reverse type 1 diabetes in mice

New hope for human patients as scientists reverse type 1 diabetes in mice

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A team of scientists from Boston Children's Hospital have reversed type 1 diabetes in mice, leading to hopes that human sufferers of the autoimmune condition may soon be treated using a similar method.
Hospital researchers said that all of the mice trialled were successfully cured of type 1 in the short term, while around one-third were cured for the duration of their lives. Previous studies have tried to cure the condition using immunotherapy.
Patients in those studies were infused with their own blood stem cells, in an attempt to reboot their immune system. However, Boston researchers discovered that a genetic defect, which causes the blood stem cells to produce less of a protein called PD-L1, contributes to so-called juvenile diabetes.
“We found that in diabetes, blood stem cells are defective, promoting inflammation and possibly leading to the onset of disease,” senior researcher Paolo Fiorina said in a statement.
To combat the defective gene, the team replaced it with healthy genes and used a harmless virus as a carrier, they found that the treated cells reversed diabetes in the tested mice. “We think resolution of PD-L1 deficiency may provide a novel therapeutic tool for the disease,” study author Ben Nasr said.
More research is now needed to determine how long the treatment would last in humans but scientists are hopeful as there weren’t any adverse effects of treatment on the mice. “The beauty of this approach is the virtual lack of any adverse effects, since it would use the patient's’ own cells,” Fiorina said.
The research was publish Continue reading

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