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12 Diabetes Myths Debunked

12 Diabetes Myths Debunked

12 Diabetes Myths Debunked


Untruths about diabetes and people who have diabetes abound. Get the facts surrounding 12 common myths.
Everyone knows everything about diabetes particularly those who dont have it. Uniquely among health conditions, uninformed family members, friends, and even strangers think they know all about your diabetes and are quick to judge you, give you advice, or ask whether you can do, whatever the activity under discussion is.
There are numerous myths regarding diabetes. Many are archaic scraps of information that simply no longer are true. Others were never true in the first place, but have been believed by people both with diabetes and without it. Finally, some myths are just curiously bizarre.
The following are truths to dispel some of the fiction surrounding diabetes.
Myth #1: People with diabetes cant eat sugar.
Truth: I doubt theres a person with diabetes who hasnt been asked, Can you eat that?
Sugar, in any volume, cannot cause diabetes.
When a person has diabetes, the body doesnt deal well with high levels of sugar, but that doesnt bar sugar. In fact, every cell in the body lives on glucose. Its the energy source of life, and the body converts all food to glucose for fuel.
How much sugar can people with diabetes eat? That depends on the person and the medications he or she takes. But sugar in no way is banned from modern diabetes meal planning.
Long ago, people with diabetes were told not to eat foods containing sugar. We now know that people with diabetes can consume sugar safely, but this restriction has remained the most widely held diabetes myth. Myths Continue reading

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Postprandial Blood Glucose Is a Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events Than Fasting Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Particularly in Women: Lessons from the San Luigi Gonzaga Diabetes Study

Postprandial Blood Glucose Is a Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events Than Fasting Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Particularly in Women: Lessons from the San Luigi Gonzaga Diabetes Study


Postprandial Blood Glucose Is a Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events Than Fasting Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Particularly in Women: Lessons from the San Luigi Gonzaga Diabetes Study
Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy
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Department of Public Health, University of Turin (A.P., G.C.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy
Search for other works by this author on:
Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Lu Continue reading

Makers gonna makea book about diabetes devices? Kids book written by @DanaMLewis

Makers gonna makea book about diabetes devices? Kids book written by @DanaMLewis


Makers gonna makea book about diabetes devices? Kids book written by @DanaMLewis
Last year after Christmas, I was running around my parents backyard with my niece when she spotted my CGM sensor on my arm and asked what it was. Im always struck when my niece and nephews have noticed my diabetes devices, and am interested to see what new humans think about and how they encounter things and what they mean. In this case, I explained the CGM and we went back to running around, but it stuck in my mind for a few days.
I also remember the excitement and attention any time a kids book has a character with diabetes in it, or a storyline of diabetes, because theres just not much out there. I was diagnosed at 14, but I love seeing PWDs in the wild and like the idea of more diabetes inclusion in materials for all ages.
So, I wrote a kids book, with the goal of introducing the concept of diabetes devices and more broadly, how people are different in different ways. I talked my incredible artist aunt into illustrating this book.
This book is primarily for me and my niece and nephews, but I know there might be a few other people who like the idea, too (even as there may be a few people who sniff at the idea*). I investigated the publishing options and decided to go with self-publishing, which would allow for:
The cheapest copies for me as the author, to be able to give to my various family members who want them.
The ability to make it available to other people who want copies.
The ability to price said copies so its accessible and reasonable to order easily.
(Its actually cheaper Continue reading

Alcohol on several days per week could lower diabetes risk

Alcohol on several days per week could lower diabetes risk


Alcohol on several days per week could lower diabetes risk
Researchers in Denmark have shown that drinking alcohol on 3 to 4 days every week can drastically reduce a person's chance of developing diabetes.
A Danish study that examined patterns of alcohol consumption has found that compared with abstainers, people who drank moderately on 3 to 4 days each week had the lowest risk of developing diabetes, especially if they drank wine.
The researchers, from the University of Southern Denmark in Copenhagen, report their findings in the journal Diabetologia.
Diabetes is a chronic disease that arises when something goes wrong with the body's ability to make or use insulin , a hormone that regulates blood sugar.
There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 develops when the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin. Type 2, which accounts for the majority of diabetes cases, results from the body's inability to use insulin effectively.
If diabetes is not controlled, it results in a state of raised blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. Over time, this causes serious damage to the body, especially to the heart, eyes, kidneys, blood vessels, and nerves.
Worldwide, the proportion of adults living with diabetes has risen from 4.7 percent in 1980 to 8.5 percent in 2014.
In 2015, diabetes was directly responsible for 1.6 million deaths, while another 2.2 million were attributed to high blood sugar in 2012.
Previous studies that have examined how alcohol consumption might be related to the risk of developing diabetes have consistently found that light to moderate consum Continue reading

Type 2 Diabetes is reversible

Type 2 Diabetes is reversible


Type 2 diabetes is a reversible condition
A body of research putting people with Type 2 diabetes on a low calorie diet has confirmed the underlying causes of the condition and established that it is reversible.
A body of research putting people with Type 2 diabetes on a low calorie diet has confirmed the underlying causes of the condition and established that it is reversible.
Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University, UK has spent almost four decades studying the condition and will present an overview of his findings at the European Association For The Study Of Diabetes (EASD 2017) in Lisbon.
In the talk he will be highlighting how his research has revealed that for people with Type 2 diabetes:
Excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver
As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose
Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail
Losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start the normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2 diabetes
This reversal of diabetes remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the condition
I think the real importance of this work is for the patients themselves, Professor Taylor says. Many have described to me how embarking on the low calorie diet has been the only option to prevent what they thought or had been told was an inevitable decline into further medication and further ill health because of their diabetes. By studying the underlying mechanisms we have been able to demonstrate the simplicity o Continue reading

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