diabetestalk.net

11-year-old Boy Walking Across US To Raise Diabetes Awareness

11-year-old boy walking across US to raise diabetes awareness

11-year-old boy walking across US to raise diabetes awareness

Editors Note: Noah and his family are moving a little slower than planned, they will be in Ogden later next week. A previous version of the story said Noah is walking to the northeastern tip of the United States, he is walking to the northwestern.
This week Noah Barnes and his father Robert Barnes will walk through Ogden on their journey from from Key West, Florida to Blaine, Washington.
Although walking across the United States is already an uncommon feat, the route this father and son team are taking is an especially unique one — tip to tip rather than straight across the country. Noah and his dad aren’t walking just to be unique, however.
Noah was diagnosed with type one diabetes at 16 months old. Now at age 11, he is working to raise awareness for the disease and money to help cure it with his cross country journey entitled “Noah’s March.”
When Noah was 10, he told his parents he didn’t want to be a diabetic anymore, so the three of them began looking up how close researchers were to finding a cure.
“That was kind of how it started, (with Noah’s question) ‘How do I quit being a diabetic?’” Joanne Barnes, Noah’s mom, said.
Noah was excited to learn a cure could happen in his lifetime, Joanne said. However, for that to be possible, there had to be sufficient funding for research.
Noah wanted to help researchers have this necessary money. After discovering his dad didn’t earn enough to foot the bill, Noah began learning how fundraisers for research money were conducted as part of his home school curriculum.
Story continues after image.
The idea to Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Pre-treated blood stem cells reverse type 1 diabetes in mice

Pre-treated blood stem cells reverse type 1 diabetes in mice

Type 1 diabetes is caused by an immune attack on the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin. To curb the attack, some researchers have tried rebooting patients’ immune systems with an autologous bone-marrow transplant, infusing them with their own blood stem cells. But this method has had only partial success.
New research in today’s Science Translational Medicine suggests a reason why.
“We found that in diabetes, blood stem cells are defective, promoting inflammation and possibly leading to the onset of disease,” says Paolo Fiorina, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital, senior investigator on the study.
But they also found that the defect can be fixed — by pre-treating the blood stem cells with small molecules or with gene therapy, to get them to make more of a protein called PD-L1.
In experiments, the treated stem cells homed to the pancreas and reversed hyperglycemia in diabetic mice, curing almost all of them of diabetes in the short term. One third maintained normal blood sugar levels for the duration of their lives.
In a dish, the modified blood stem cells curbed the autoimmune reaction in cells from both mice and humans.
“There’s really a reshaping of the immune system when you inject these cells,” says Fiorina, a researcher in the Division of Nephrology at Boston Children’s.
The powers of PD-L1
Fiorina, Moufida Ben Nasr, PhD, and colleagues began by using gene expression profiling to find out what proteins blood stem cells make. They discovered that blood stem cells from diabetic mice and humans have alterations in the network of genetic re Continue reading

Finnish Researchers Set to Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials?

Finnish Researchers Set to Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials?

In July 2017, it was announced that Finnish researchers would begin human trials of a Type 1 diabetes vaccine in 2018.
On 19 July 2017, the Finnish news web site Yle reported that a group of Finnish researchers had developed a vaccine for Type 1 diabetes, and that human trials were set to begin in 2018:
A vaccine for type 1 diabetes developed by Finnish researchers will be tested on mainly Finnish human subjects in late 2018, researchers announced on Tuesday. The scientists first found that the prototype works effectively and safely on mice, and now say that the vaccine could be in mainstream use within eight years if the coming rounds of tests prove successful.
One skeptical reader asked us to check out the story.
Yle is Finland’s public broadcasting corporation (akin to NPR or the BBC). T he names of the lead researchers and their universities are real, the announcement of vaccine trials is real, and the story is true.
On 18 July 2017, the University of Tampere in Finland announced that Professor of Virology Heikki Hyöty and his team of researchers had identified a particular strand of enteroviruses (viruses transmitted through the intestines) linked to Type 1 diabetes, and developed a vaccine against them.
“Already now it is known that the vaccine is effective and safe on mice,” Hyöty said. “The developing process has now taken a significant leap forward as the next phase is to study the vaccine in humans.”
The university’s statement continued:
In the first clinical phase, the vaccine will be studied in a small group of adults to ensure the safety of the va Continue reading

With diabetes rising at alarming rate, California puts money behind prevention campaign

With diabetes rising at alarming rate, California puts money behind prevention campaign

California officials decided this week to dedicate $5 million to prevent people at high risk for diabetes from getting the disease, hoping to stem the huge numbers of Californians expected to be diagnosed in the coming years.
Currently 9% of Californians have diabetes, but a study last year found that 46% of adults in California have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be considered diabetic.
“That is a staggering number,” said Flojaune G. Cofer, research and state policy director for Davis-based Public Health Advocates, which sponsored the bill, SB 97, that adds the new funding.
Cofer said that if nothing is done to stop prediabetics from developing diabetes, millions more Californians will become diabetic in the next five years and the state’s diabetes rate will likely double. Approximately 70% of prediabetics will become diabetic in their lifetime.
Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday approved $5 million to pay for Medi-Cal recipients to enroll in the Diabetes Prevention Program starting July next year. Participants must be overweight and have high blood sugar levels, but not yet be considered diabetic.
The program helps people lose 5% to 7% of their body weight by eating more healthfully, exercising more and reducing stress — and has been shown to cut the risk of developing diabetes by more than half. California will become the third state to cover the program as a Medicaid benefit after Montana and Minnesota.
Daniel Zingale, senior vice president at the California Endowment, said Medi-Cal has long covered t Continue reading

Avoiding Eye Complications

Avoiding Eye Complications

When it comes to diabetes-related eye complications, the good news is that most cases of severe vision loss due to diabetes are preventable. The bad news is that tens of thousands of people still lose vision to diabetes each year, despite all that is known about prevention and treatment.
Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness for American adults between the ages of 20 and 74. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that 12,000–24,000 people in the United States lose their vision to diabetic retinopathy each year, and studies have shown that people with diabetes have a fivefold to twenty-fivefold increased risk of blindness in their lifetimes.
-- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >>
However, these numbers very likely underestimate the true incidence of vision loss and blindness, because diabetes can cause a variety of eye diseases other than retinopathy, several of which can cause severe visual impairment (see “Eye Diseases Associated With Diabetes” ). Moreover, these statistics ignore vision loss less severe than “legal blindness” (defined as vision on the eye chart worse than 20/200 with the use of prescription lenses or severe loss of peripheral vision to within 20 degrees of central vision). But even less severe vision loss can and does substantially affect quality of life for thousands of people with diabetes.
Prevention strategies
Why do so many people continue to lose their sight to diabetes when so much is known about preventing and t Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles