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10 Tips To Manage Your Diabetes

10 tips to manage your diabetes

10 tips to manage your diabetes

The problem with living with a chronic condition like diabetes is that it’s, well, chronic. It doesn’t go away. Bridget McNulty, type 1 diabetic and editor of Sweet Life diabetes lifestyle magazine and online community, offers 10 tips to make living with diabetes a little easier:
1. Take your medication
This one is so obvious that I shouldn’t have to mention it, but it probably has the biggest impact on any diabetic’s life. Insulin – whether in pill form for type 2 diabetics or injections or a pump for type 1 diabetics – is literally life-saving. Take your medication properly, and you can live a long, happy, healthy life with diabetes. Don’t take your medication and you can get very ill, very fast.
2. Eat a healthy diet
Again, it’s not rocket science, but it is vitally important. People with diabetes don’t have to eat a special ‘diabetes diet’, but they do have to eat the same healthy diet that we should all be eating: little to no fast food, junk food, fizzy drinks, sweets and cakes, lots of fresh vegetables, some fruit, good quality proteins, the right kind of fats and a small amount of wholegrain carbs. We all know that refined carbohydrates like white rice and pasta and doughnuts and cookies are bad for us – as diabetics, it’s important to know this and respect it. That’s not to say there’s no room for treats in life, but I always stick to my mom’s advice: “everything in moderation"
3. Exercise regularly
Moderate exercise three times a week is the magic key to a healthy life with diabetes, in my opinion. We can all find half an hour thr Continue reading

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Diabetes poses growing challenge in Australia

Diabetes poses growing challenge in Australia

Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic condition in Australia and the three types of diabetes — type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes — are all increasing.
The most common, type 2, is the fastest increasing, associated with modifiable lifestyle risk factors (especially obesity) and strong genetic and family-related risk factors. Often, people with type 2 diabetes show no symptoms, and without regular health checks it does more damage.
This is a condition that can lead to more serious problems such as blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks and stroke. In 2011, according to statistics released this year, it was estimated that about 730,000 Australians had diagnosed diabetes.
Of those, 1.7 per cent (12,300) had lower limbs amputated as a result. With more than 280 people developing diabetes every day, you should be paying close attention to your health and have a regular GP, especially if you are already at risk.
Researchers led by Anna Hatton from the University of Queensland want to help diabetics who have foot nerve damage improve their balance and physical activity.
Hatton, from the school of health and rehabilitation sciences, says the international research effort will look at the use of shoe insoles to provide practical assistance to those in need. “Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a consequence of diabetes, can increase the risk of falls and serious injuries requiring hospitalisation,” she says.
“The quality of signals transmitted from the feet to the brain, when damaged, disrupts the vital cues required to help people remain upright.
“Using shoe insole Continue reading

Frequent urinating at night may be sign of diabetes – Doctor

Frequent urinating at night may be sign of diabetes – Doctor

A resident doctor, Dr Segun Fadare, on Tuesday said urinating frequently at night could be a warning sign of high blood sugar level, the hallmark of Type 2 Diabetes
Fadare, who works with the Babcock University Teaching Hospital Annex, Ibadan said, “Needing to go to the bathroom once at night is considered normal, however, urinating more than once at night could indicate an underlying health condition like diabetes.
“Having diabetes leads to excess sugar builds up in your blood which causes the body to excrete the excess glucose through the urine.
“This triggers more frequent urination as the body tries to get rid of the excess amount of glucose and leave the body dehydrated and need to drink more fluid and urinate even more.”
According to him, while Type 2 diabetes may not be noticed easily, other signs to watch out for include excessive thirst, unexplainable tiredness and weight loss.
“Early diagnosis of diabetes is important to prevent complications including organ damage, heart disease, stroke and kidney failure.
“It is important to watch out for the warning signs, especially if you have increased the risk for diabetes in order to control your blood sugar level and prevent complications.”
Fadare advised that people should go for regular checkups for early diagnosis.
(NAN) Continue reading

What to Know About the ADA's 2018 Standards of Medical Care if You Have Diabetes

What to Know About the ADA's 2018 Standards of Medical Care if You Have Diabetes

Living with poorly controlled blood sugar levels may lead to potentially serious health complications for people with diabetes — including diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, amputations, depression, sexual issues, heart disease, stroke, and even death. But luckily, if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, managing your diet, lifestyle, and treatment well can help you stabilize blood sugar and ultimately reduce the risk of these potential future health issues.
To do this, it’s crucial to stay up to date on current treatment standards in the United States — and that starts with turning to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), which releases its Standards of Medical Care each year.
What Are the ADA Standards of Care and Why Should You Care?
In the ADA’s latest guidelines, released online in December 2017, the organization lists updates in areas related to heart disease and diabetes, new health technology, and more.
The standards reflect the latest evidence available to help improve care and health outcomes in people with diabetes, says William T. Cefalu, MD, the chief scientific, medical, and mission officer at the ADA who is based in New Orleans, Louisiana. “The new evidence that has been available this year from published work has been incredible,” Dr. Cefalu says.
Although the Standards of Medical Care are primarily geared toward the healthcare community, your diabetes management can benefit if you know about them, says Robert A. Gabbay, MD, PhD, the chief medical officer of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.
Following is everything you need to know Continue reading

How to Improve Blood Sugar Levels and Reverse Diabetes For Good

How to Improve Blood Sugar Levels and Reverse Diabetes For Good

Every 23 seconds another person is diagnosed with diabetes — one the leading causes of death in the United States.
But these people don’t have to suffer. Diabetes is preventable, manageable, and reversible.
What is Diabetes? — A Quick Overview
There are two types of diabetes — type 1 and type 2.
This is an over-simplified chart, but it gives you a good visual of the differences and similarities between the two. Now, let’s dig a little deeper into each type of diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance happens when blood sugar levels are so consistently high that the cells don’t respond to insulin (a hormone that helps lower blood sugar) like they used to. When the cell aren’t as sensitive to insulin, blood sugar levels raise even more. As a result, insulin levels raise and the cells become more insulin resistant. This vicious cycle is commonly caused by eating too much sugar, not moving enough, and stressing too much.
Conversely, type 1 diabetes is when the body lacks the ability to produce insulin. In some cases, this is happens because the immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Despite the lack of insulin, type 1 diabetics can still manage their blood sugar levels by taking exogenous insulin.
Although type 1 and type 2 diabetes are caused in completely different ways, they both lead to higher blood sugar levels that will destroy cells throughout the body and cause chronic inflammation. If we can improve blood sugar levels then we can manage and reverse diabetes Continue reading

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