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10 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

10 Foods to Avoid With Diabetes

10 Foods to Avoid With Diabetes

Foods No One With Type 2 Diabetes Should Eat
The top 10 foods that should never be eaten by type 2 diabetics are ones that are high on the glycemic index, full of fats that are easily oxidized or foods high in advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). These are the foods to avoid with diabetes at all costs.
Here’s a quick view of the list:
Protein bars
Jasmine rice
Tofu ice cream
Genetically-engineered wheat
Fried foods
Trans fat foods
Vegetable oils
Boxed cereals
Pizza
Hot dogs
Read on to learn about why you should be avoiding these foods.
Protein Bars, Rice, Ice Cream, and Wheat
The first foods every diabetic should avoid are Cliff™ protein bars, jasmine rice, tofu ice cream, and genetically engineered wheat.
The glycemic index is a scale from 0 to 100 that measures the rate that sugars are released into the bloodstream from carbohydrate foods. A rating low on this scale between 0 and 55 correlates to a food that is not a problem to diabetics. When these low glycemic index foods are eaten, blood sugar stays low in diabetics. Examples include cherries, apples, lettuce, celery, beans, and chickpeas.
On the other hand, foods high on the glycemic index that are rated 70 to 100+ are ones that cause an exceptionally high burst of insulin after the blood sugar levels skyrocket. This reaction will eventually wear out the pancreas and may even cause the need for insulin at a later date.
Fried Foods, Trans Fat Foods, and Vegetable Oils
The problem with many types of fat is that their chemical structures aren’t stable when heated. The type of fat they have is called unsaturated, Continue reading

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What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.
Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.
Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.
Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and Continue reading

Enjoying the Best Grains for Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

Enjoying the Best Grains for Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

If you have diabetes, should you stop eating bread, rice and pasta? While everyone with diabetes (and pre-diabetes) benefits from eliminating processed grains from their diet (foods like white rice, cold cereals, white bread and snack foods), some individuals benefit from avoiding whole grain products as well. Others can lose weight and normalize blood sugar levels while still enjoying grains. However, if you eat grains, it’s important to be picky about the type and portion size of the grains you choose.
Individuals who have difficulty losing weight and controlling blood sugar levels sometimes benefit from eliminating all grains, including whole grains, from their diets for a while. Whole and processed grains contain an easily digested type of starch that can trigger spikes in blood sugar levels after meals, leading to weight gain and many of the complications of diabetes. Some people find that they can add whole grains back into their diets after they reach their weight and blood sugar goals.
Others with diabetes can maintain good health while still enjoying grains, but find that it is important to eat only whole grains, and in moderate quantities. Serving grains as a side dish, or about ¼ of a meal, is a helpful strategy that lends itself to healthy weight management and blood sugar control.
So what are whole grains and why are they nutritionally superior to processed grains? All true grains, including rice, wheat, barley and corn, are seeds that come from different types of grasses. A whole grain consists of three basic components: an outer layer called the bran, a st Continue reading

Statin Drugs Linked with Parkinson's Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes

Statin Drugs Linked with Parkinson's Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes

"Scientists concluded that statin medications were associated with a higher risk of Parkinson's disease."
Despite their success as multi-billion dollar cholesterol medications, statins have been shown to increase the risk of the neurodegenerative disease Parkinson's. The list of statin drug-induced disorders also includes diabetes, cataracts, liver and kidney failure, memory loss, muscle damage, pneumonia and immune suppression. These are all a heavy price to pay for the drug management of cholesterol. While not everyone experiences these adverse effects, it should pose some serious questions about the ubiquitous use of these meds and the desire to put everyone on them. More important, it hopefully propels you into a direction of self-empowerment with health management.
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Statins and Parkinson's Disease
The reports of Parkinson's disease associated with cholesterol lowering statin medications have been making subdued headlines for a few years. Recently, studies have made significant headline news that challenges the dogma that statins help prevent and reduce the risk of Parkinson’s disease. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society and the June 2017 Movement Disorders journal published a retrospective case-controlled study. After a large database analysis, scientists concluded that statin medications, especially lipophilic statins like Lipitor were associated with higher risk of Parkinson’s disease. The greatest risk of the disease developing occurred within a year, after starting the medication. Those who were on the lipophi Continue reading

Why the Glycemic Index Fails for Many People with Diabetes

Why the Glycemic Index Fails for Many People with Diabetes

As simple as it seems, most doctors and dietitians still don't tell people with diabetes that the carbohydrate content of the food they eat is what raises their blood sugar and that lowering their carbohydrate intake will lower their blood sugar.
Instead, they recommend the so called "good carbs" which are those which are low on the "Glycemic Index," chief of which are what they call "Healthy whole grains," like whole wheat bread, brown rice, pasta, and oatmeal.
If you look any of these foods up in your handy carb counter--you DO have a carb counter, I hope!--you will see they all contain a lot of carbohydrate. Two ounces of whole wheat bread--one thin slice--generally contain around 29 grams of carbohydrate and how many people only eat one slice?
A single ounce of dry oatmeal contains 18 grams, but what most people consider a full serving is at least twice that size. Two ounces of low glycemic pasta contain around 56 grams of carb, but again, two ounces is a very small amount--about 1/3 of what most people consider a normal portion of pasta.
If you measure your blood sugar for several hours after eating a normal serving of whole wheat bread or oatmeal you will see a spike, possibly a very high spike well over 200 mg/dl. You may have to measure your blood sugar 4 hours after eating pasta to see the spike it causes because of how slowly it digests, but eventually it does digest, and if you keep testing you will see it cause a spike, too.
So what's going on here?
The answer is that the glycemic index only works for people who have a normal second phase insulin response. If yo Continue reading

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