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10 Facts About Diabetes Seniors Need To Know

10 Facts About Diabetes Seniors Need to Know

10 Facts About Diabetes Seniors Need to Know

Diabetes is a chronic disease related to insulin levels in the blood. According to the World Health Organization, this disease is an emerging global epidemic that can be attributed to increased rates of obesity and physical inactivity. It can often go unnoticed in seniors, and it’s important to pay attention to potential symptoms and have frequent checks of your blood glucose levels if you are at risk.
Here are 10 facts about the disease that seniors need to know.
1. Causes of Diabetes
Scientists believe that type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors that can trigger the disease, such as viruses. Type 2 diabetes has been linked to excess weight and inactivity as well as genetics and environmental factors.
2. Types of Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production. It is caused by the body’s immune system attacking the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. The body stops producing insulin, and glucose rises to dangerous levels. Type 2 diabetes, or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, occurs more frequently in seniors and those over the age of 40. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still produces insulin (but often not enough) or the organs in the body don’t use it properly, so sometimes there is too much insulin in the system. Type 2 is much more common than Type 1 and accounts for about 90 percent of all cases worldwide.
3. Treatments for Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes can only be treated with insulin injections — otherwise it can be fatal. There is no cure for it. Type 2 diabetes can be treated with diet and exercise or sometimes Continue reading

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World Diabetes Day 2017: 8 crucial ways to control your blood sugar levels

World Diabetes Day 2017: 8 crucial ways to control your blood sugar levels

A disorder of high blood sugar levels, diabetes is spreading its wings to include about 70 million people in India, both in the urban and rural areas. The serious condition exposes patients to several other complications and could be life-threatening. What’s worrisome is that it often goes undiagnosed and many are unaware of its long-term implications. From cardio-vascular diseases to its perilous effect on eyes and kidneys as well as the dangerous gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that approximately five million people die each year as a consequence of the disease.
Diabetes is the general term used for a condition that leads to an increase in glucose levels in the blood. It occurs when the pancreas is either unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin, or the insulin produced does not act properly (a condition known as insulin resistance). But, with a proper diet and lifestyle change, you can control the disease.
On World Diabetes Day observed on November 14 each year — to raise awareness and provide affordable care to all — here are some important and key factors that you need to take care of so as to stop it from being fatal.
Dr S K Wangnoo, Senior Consultant (Endocrinology), Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi shares a few tips.
Family history of diabetes: You inherit a predisposition to the condition and then something in your environment triggers it, especially if there is a history of obesity. Type 2 diabetes has a stronger connection to family history and lineage than type 1, however, with pro Continue reading

The Ultimate Anti-Diabetes Diet

The Ultimate Anti-Diabetes Diet

One of America's most common killer diseases, type 2 diabetes, jeopardizes the health, quality of life, and longevity of nearly 24 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and that number continues to rise. New cases have doubled over the past 30 years, and because the disease occurs gradually and often with no obvious symptoms, many people don't even know they have it. People who are overweight are at higher risk because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the crux of the disease.
But a solution to the problem is within reach: a groundbreaking eating plan not only helps prevent this chronic disease, but actually reverses it while also promoting weight loss. Focusing on plant-based meals,the revolutionary plan was developed by Vegetarian Times former Ask the Doc columnist, Neal Barnard, MD, and is backed by the results of his long-term study. Your doctor may not tell you about this diet: dietitians generally counsel overweight diabetics to cut calories, reduce serving sizes, and avoid starchy carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels.
But Barnard's team at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and scientists at George Washington University and the University of Toronto thought this might be the wrong approach, considering that carbohydrate-rich rice, legumes, and root vegetables are staples throughout Asia and Africa, where most people are thin and diabetes rates are low. Barnard and his team studied a group of diabetics, comparing the effects of a diet based on standard recommendations versus a vegan-style diet wit Continue reading

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes to Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes to Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning.
"Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high."
Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says.
Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes
Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast.
However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with Continue reading

Diabetes-related amputations up significantly in California — and San Diego

Diabetes-related amputations up significantly in California — and San Diego

Clinicians are amputating more toes, legs, ankles and feet of patients with diabetes in California — and San Diego County in particular — in a “shocking” trend that has mystified diabetes experts here and across the country.
Though they often prolong lives, diabetes-related amputations deprive patients of independence, increase the need for social services and add to disability and medical costs.
Statewide, lower-limb amputations increased by more than 31 percent from 2010 to 2016 when adjusted for population change. In San Diego County, the increase was more than twice that: 66.4 percent.
Losing a foot, ankle or especially a leg robs patients of their independence, hampers their ability to walk and makes them more vulnerable to infection. It also can shorten their lives.
This trend, which inewsource documented with state hospital data, is one physicians, surgeons and public health officials are at a loss to explain, though many have theories.
Edward Gregg of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the California numbers are worrisome.
Public health officials consider amputations to be an important indicator of a region’s diabetes care because diabetes and its complications can be prevented, said Gregg, chief of epidemiology and statistics for the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation.
“If we see it going down, then it’s a good sign, because so many aspects of good diabetes care are in theory affected. And when you see it going up, that’s a concern,” he said.
The CDC has noticed an increase of 27 percent nationally in the rate of amputations Continue reading

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