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Working Out While In Ketosis

How To Lose Weight Without Exercising Or Eating Tons Of Kale

How To Lose Weight Without Exercising Or Eating Tons Of Kale

Gaining weight when you don’t want to gain weight sucks. You are minding your own business, living life, and all of a sudden your stomach is hanging out over your jeans. How did that happen? You didn’t mess with your body so why is it messing with you? Unfortunately, these things can happen to anybody when you don’t take care of yourself. But what does taking care of yourself even mean? To a lot of people, it means hitting the gym and working out for 3 hours every single day. For others, it means never eating an unhealthy carb ever again. I don’t like the idea of working out. I know it sounds crazy considering I’m writing this on a health and wellness site, but there are a million other things I’d rather do than work out. Same goes with eating healthy. I love all foods. I don’t discriminate. I don’t care if it’s a $200 piece of sushi or a $1.25 Twinkie. I will enjoy it. But I don’t have the same type of metabolism I did as a teenager. I’m also not as active (this site doesn’t write itself). That means my body has a way of reminding me that it’s no longer the body it used to be without any effort. Now I actually have to be proactive with regards to maintaining a body that I like. You might be in the same boat. You don’t exercise for a variety of different reasons: You have to work 28 hours a day Your joints are killing you You’d rather read Harry Potter again Losing weight shouldn’t always involve massive amounts of exercise and thankfully it doesn’t have to. If your goal is to start dropping pounds before you take it to the next level with hot yoga or circuit training, then we are going to show you how to do that without exercising. How to Lose Weight Without Exercising What it comes down to is understanding why your body gains weight. Continue reading >>

How To Workout While In Ketosis

How To Workout While In Ketosis

Ketosis, the dietary state where you burn fatty acids as your primary fuel instead of sugar, presents certain difficulties when attempting to work out. Glycogen, the preferred fuel for muscular contractions, remains in short supply in the absence of dietary carbohydrates. Any low-carbohdyrate diet can challenge your ability to workout, but with a few modifications, you can train with intensity. Video of the Day Lift in short, intense sessions. Resistance training provides numerous benefits, including muscle gain and fat loss, but does not require marathon sessions. If you are training for longer than an hour in the gym, you are not training hard enough. Train using lower-repetition sets. Keep your sets to 10 reps or less, and if this means you need to increase the weight, still select a weight that you can safely control. If you want more volume, perform more sets. This will allow your depleted glycogen, or sugar reserves to replenish slightly between sets. Perform intense cardiovascular exercise. Sustaining marathon-level endurance training without carbohydrates is extremely difficult. If you wish to run three miles, but the lack of carbohydrates limits your performance, run your distance in interval fashion. Run as far as you can, walk until you recover, then continue at your run pace. This can be duplicated for any form of cardiovascular exercise. Eat a small amount of carbohydrates post-workout. Following your workout, your blood sugar is extremely low and your body will shuttle sugars you consume directly to your muscles. This will help refill the muscle glycogen that you burned during training. About 25 to 50 g of dextrose or maltodextrin is ideal, but start with only 25 g and determine the effect on your diet. Consume a small amount of whey protein with your carb Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Exercises For Fat Loss While On A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Best Exercises For Fat Loss While On A Ketogenic Diet?

while in keto you usually wont have enough glycogen in the muscle to support true HIIT workouts or super heavy lifting (1–3 rep lifts where you are testing maxes). This is the case after probably 1–2 weeks of being in ketosis, depending on how fast you deplete your glycogen. After this, your body has to go through another process to create glycogen and that will come from converting protein (either the protein that you eat or from your muscles). Ketosis does have a muscle sparing effect so the jury is still out on this. Also, how your diet is set up can change how your body is responding. A true ketosis diet (the one patients are prescribed) would be about 75-80% fat, 15–20% protein and 5% carbohydrates. This macro distribution is not one for active adults working out 5–6 times a week. The expenditure is low for these people so they don’t need a lot of carbohydrates supporting their energy output. Some athletes who do ketosis use a bit more carbs and time them around the workout or in the evening before bed. To test how much carbohydrates you can tolerate you need to monitor with a blood glucose monitor. Basically, my answer is that there is not clear definition of where your macros should be without being specific and measuring your glucose levels. If you are on 5% carbs or trace carbs 20–50g then walking or moderate intensity is about all you’ll want to do. Lifting weights will also be good to add into your program, but be aware that you’ll have better luck doing more low weight/high reps work. Your body NEEDS carbs, where those carbs come from is important and should come from low glycemic natural food, fruit, vegetable (mainly pulses), nuts and seeds. A ketogenic diet trains your body to burn fat but glucose is stored mainly in the muscles and liver Continue reading >>

Pre & Post Workout On Keto – My Experience

Pre & Post Workout On Keto – My Experience

This is about a question that I often get, which is what what to take/drink/eat before and after working out. My mindset about this has changed a lot over the past few years, so I wanted to share my own experience. Who knows, maybe you can relate to this. Before starting Keto 1,5 years ago, I used to be obsessed with timing my carbs and protein perfectly pre- and post workout. If I didn’t have a big portion of rice or pasta approximately 2 hours before working out, I felt less energy and my performance would suffer as a result. Then, after working out I had to have my double Protein shake mixed with cheap carbohydrates in the form of maltodextrin. As soon as I got home, I would force myself to eat as big of a meal as possible, consisting of carbohydrates and protein, as I thought all of this was essential to build muscle and to maximize protein synthesis. I was always really tired and crashing after working out, so my day was pretty much done after that. Doesn’t sound like too much fun, right? Now, lets fast forward one and a half years later. Thanks to the Ketogenic Diet, I’m able to only work out once/week in the gym since August 2015 while maintaining the physique I want. As an example, here is what my weekly workout day looked like last saturday: – 7 AM: Cup of coffee with coconut oil after getting up – 12 PM: Lunch: Cabbage with butter and some Mackerel – 6 PM: Full body gym workout with my girlfriend Zsofi. We both felt tons of energy, she managed to beat her own bench press record. We finished after 45 minutes, without the slightest energy crash and still being able to make the best out of the rest of our evening. – 8 PM: Dinner: Buttered Cauliflower-mash with ground beef That’s it. No supplements/boosters/aminoacids/carbs or other powders before, Continue reading >>

Low-carb And Exercise In The Real World

Low-carb And Exercise In The Real World

The general consensus around the Paleo world is that the more active you are, the more carbs you need. That’s especially true if the exercise is intense: walking is one thing, but if you’re getting up into the high-intensity sprinting or ten-mile runs, your body will be hurting for some carbs. This is all based on science, but the vast majority of the science is from a very limited population: trained elite athletes, and/or college-age men doing intense exercise and not looking to lose weight. What about the people who aren’t doing sprinting or 10-mile runs, but might be doing occasional squatting or 3-mile runs? What about middle-aged men? What about women? What about people who went low-carb to lose weight? There’s plenty of anecdotal evidence about exercise on a low-carb diet, but it’s all conflicting. On the one hand, beginners often start trying to do a hard workout every day on a low-carb version of Paleo where they’re also trying to restrict calories for weight loss. Then they get exhausted and their performance completely tanks, but if they add in a potato or two every day, they perk right back up again and feel fine. But on the other hand, there are also plenty of anecdotes about people who eat low-carb and feel just fine in the gym. So here’s a look at some studies on low-carb diets for ordinary non-athletes, how they affect exercise, and the role of different individual factors (for example, everything can change depending on whether or not weight loss is involved, which is not something you’ll find in the elite athlete studies). Performance on a Low-Carb or Ketogenic Diet When it comes to diets and athletic performance, it’s important to distinguish between a true ketogenic diet and a low-carb diet that isn’t ketogenic. If you don’t kno Continue reading >>

Keto Diet And Exercise – Should I Exercise On A Ketogenic Diet?

Keto Diet And Exercise – Should I Exercise On A Ketogenic Diet?

Yes and No! If you are just starting out on a ketogenic diet and you don’t normally exercise, then NO. When you just start out, you are likely to have some keto flu symptoms. Get through this period first. Then YES, definitely incorporate exercise into your life! Once your body becomes fat adapted, you may find that you have much more energy anyway and actually want to exercise. I know this may sound hard to believe if you normally don’t have the energy or the desire to exercise. If you have always exercised, then YES! You definitely want to continue to exercise. If, however you initially feel a little weaker than normal, just listen to your body and slow down for a bit. Your energy will return. We all know exercise is important no matter what eating plan or lifestyle we follow. However, exercise can be way more efficient when following a ketogenic diet compared to a high carb diet. As a sweetener, the results achieved from exercise whilst fat burning can be much better. Just remember, that you cannot “out exercise” bad eating. Eating good healthy and nutritious food always has to be the starting point if you want to change your life. It is your diet that essentially supply the building blocks for your desired outcome. Are you interested to know exactly how exercise can support you while on the ketogenic diet? Then read on and find out… Exercise Improves Insulin Sensitivity Unfortunately, for many of us, insulin sensitivity decreases as we age and many of us become less active. Inactive people are more likely to have elevated levels of blood glucose. They tend to have higher levels of insulin secretion over the course of a day and as result have excess body fat. This is also the first step on the way to metabolic syndrome and may lead to pre-diabetes. Or ultim Continue reading >>

Low-carb/ketogenic Diets And Exercise Performance

Low-carb/ketogenic Diets And Exercise Performance

Low-carb and ketogenic diets are extremely popular. These diets have been around for a long time, and share similarities with paleolithic diets (1). Research has shown that lower-carb diets can help you lose weight and improve various health markers (2). However, the evidence on muscle growth, strength and performance is mixed (3, 4, 5). This article takes a detailed look at low-carb/ketogenic diets and physical performance. The guidelines for a low-carb diet vary between studies and authorities. In research, low-carb is usually classified as less than 30% of calories from carbs (6, 7). Most average low-carb diets consist of 50–150 grams of carbs per day, a fairly high amount of protein and a moderate-to-high fat intake. Yet for some athletes, "low-carb" can still mean over 200 grams of carbs per day. In contrast, a well-formulated ketogenic diet is more restrictive, usually consisting of only 30–50 grams of carbs per day, combined with a very high fat intake (8). This extremely low carb intake helps you achieve ketosis, a process where ketones and fat become the main sources of energy for the body and brain (9). There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including: Standard ketogenic diet: This is an extremely low-carb, moderate-protein, high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and 5% carbs (8). Cyclical ketogenic diet: This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days. Targeted ketogenic diet: This diet allows you to add carbs, usually around periods of intense exercise or workouts. The pie charts below show the typical nutrient breakdown of a low-fat Western diet, a low-carb diet and a typical ketogenic diet: In most low-carb and ketogenic diets, people restrict food sources like grain Continue reading >>

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The other day, I was on a phone call with a good friend and fellow strength coach, Joe Dowdell, CSCS, of Peak Performance in New York City. I told him my current deadlift personal record stood at a respectable 420 pounds but that I aspired to pull a 500. He told me it was "doable." Great. Then I threw him a curveball worthy of Dodgers southpaw Clayton Kershaw. I wanted to add 80 pounds to my deadlift … while following a ketogenic diet. Joe let out a big sigh. Staying on a ketogenic diet means eating so few carbohydrates that when your glycogen stores empty, your body cashes-in on a process called 'ketosis' for energy. The carbohydrate threshold to stay in ketosis will vary by individual, but the guideline for most folks is fewer than 50 grams of carbs. I was dead-set on eating fewer than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. How low is that? One medium banana would place you over your daily limit! Wait, don't carbs stimulate muscle growth? How could this work in the long term? More important, can I add 80 pounds to my deadlift without eating much carbs? These questions and more piqued the scientist in me. So I set out to find the answers not only by poring over the scientific literature but through real-world application on the gym floor as well. Now before you rush down to the bottom of the article to see if I did it, I want to preface the grand finale by explaining the anabolic capacity of carbohydrates. Let me walk you through several key areas of anabolism in which carbohydrates and insulin play a role. Carbohydrates, Protein, and Insulin Carbohydrates create anabolism largely by setting off a cascade of hormone-driven events. (Just so we're clear, you also get an insulin response from protein as well.) Chief among these events is secretion of a hormone called insuli Continue reading >>

Why You Should Take Raspberry Ketones With A Good Exercise Plan

Why You Should Take Raspberry Ketones With A Good Exercise Plan

Raspberry ketones have been around a while and are a popular dietary supplement that many take to aid weight loss. The reason why the world quickly became obsessed with this compound was because Dr. Oz featured it on his hit prime-time TV show. The popular doctor described it as the “world’s number one miracle in a bottle”. With the amount of respect that Dr. Oz gets, it is no wonder that they are taken by so many health-conscious individuals all over the world. How do Raspberry Ketones Work? The big issue is that scientists do not know exactly how raspberry ketones work their magic. However, they are aware of the health benefits they provide. A number of studies have been conducted in rodents, which show that they help shrink fat cells and increases lipase, which helps break down the fat. It also aids metabolism. How to Get the Most out Them? The thing to realize is that this is not a miracle drug as many believe, but a great supplement to help increase weight-loss. This means that they will work best when taken alongside a calorie-controlled diet and a great exercise plan. Why Do Raspberry Ketones Work Better With a Good Exercise Plan? Hormone Imbalance Supplements always work best when your body has a good balance of hormones. Your endocrine system works hard to try and ensure your hormones have a good balance, but it is not always the case. However, a great natural way to balance out the hormones in your body is by regular exercise. Metabolism Raspberry ketones work by increasing the metabolic rate of those who take it. When this rate is increased, doing more exercise will help further increase the metabolic rate and thereby help you lose even more weight. There are also certain types of exercise that will help you boost metabolism, so tailoring your exercise Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting And Fitness

Intermittent Fasting And Fitness

We’ve all heard the phrase: “To get big, you have to eat big.” This is true because you can’t build tissue, muscle, etc. without the building blocks of nutrient rich foods. It’s also said: “Everything has its season.” This is the truth behind intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting is a controversial topic to some, because it’s often touted as a cure-all or magic bullet. It’s neither. But it is a tool that you should have in your fitness toolbox, and it probably wouldn’t be a bad idea for you to get very comfortable wielding it. [EDITOR’S NOTE: I, Brian, have just begun experimenting with fasted exercise and I have enjoyed it so far. I plan to see how the two areas can be used to push personal performance. So…you know…I’ll let you know.] When people hear me talk about intermittent fasting a few questions always come up. Am I going to starve? Do I have to deprive myself? Am I going to lose muscle or become atrophy? But first…what is intermittent fasting? Intermittent fasting is just that, intermittent. It’s not full fasting and it doesn’t go on for days at a stretch. Intermittent fasting is done within a 24 hour period with a fasting / feeding cycle. Your fasting / feeding cycle can be adjusted to your own schedule and other variables, such as nutritional needs, which you dictate. A common ratio is 16:8 – fasting for 16 hours with an 8-hour feeding window. It’s good to experiment with what cycle works best for you. During the feeding window, you can choose to eat one, two, three or whatever number of meals you choose. During the fasting window, there is no eating, snacking or calorie intake. Some people choose to allow things like gum, pre-workout, coffee and tea during their fasting period. Now, back to the questions I listed. Al Continue reading >>

Keto Youtube: Can I Workout While On A Ketogenic Diet?

Keto Youtube: Can I Workout While On A Ketogenic Diet?

There seems to be a lot of confusion about working out while on a ketogenic diet, so here I try to clarify that yes you can workout while on keto, but you need to pay special attention to your electrolytes and also allow your body to adjust to a new way of eating. Continue reading >>

How To Exercise When You’re In Ketosis

How To Exercise When You’re In Ketosis

Since going keto means greatly reducing carbs, and since carbs are the body’s primary source of fuel, you might be wondering what your options are when it comes to how to exercise while in ketosis. The good news is that while there are some things to keep in mind, exercise is totally possible on the ketogenic diet and even has some big benefits health- and energy-wise. These are important to know when wading through any misconceptions around low-carb eating and working out. Exercising in Ketosis First, let’s note that the traditional view of weight loss—simply eating less and exercising longer, often with long bouts of cardio—is outdated and unsustainable. In order to see real results when it comes to losing weight and getting leaner, what you eat really matters. A great place to start is checking out a guide on sourcing meat, dairy, and seafood. Therefore, paying attention to the quality of your ketogenic diet itself, and maintaining a steady state of ketosis, is the most important first step you can take. To see if you are actually in a metabolic state of ketosis, testing your ketone levels is vitally important. However, exercise also has many benefits for your health. It’s good for the heart, builds muscle to keep you lean and toned, and strengths the bones. Thankfully, exercise can completely fit into your routine while eating for ketosis. You just need to keep in mind a few simple considerations: Type of Exercise Nutritional needs vary depending on the type of exercise performed. Workouts styles are typically divided into four types: aerobic, anaerobic, flexibility, and stability. Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio exercise, is anything that lasts over three minutes. Lower intensity, steady-state cardio is fat burning, making it very friendly for the Continue reading >>

Exercise & Ketosis

Exercise & Ketosis

This is a summary/extract from The Ketogenic Diet by Lyle McDonald. When muscle glycogen falls to extremely low levels (about 40 mmol/kg), anaerobic exercise performance may be negatively affected. Individuals following a ketogenic diet who wish to lift weights or perform sprint training must make modifications by consuming carbohydrates for optimal performance. During long term ketogenic diets, muscle glycogen maintains at about 70 mmol/kg (113-115) leaving a ‘safety factor’ of about 30 mmol/kg at which time glycolysis will most likely be impaired. Low-intensity aerobic exercise, below the lactate threshold, is useful for both establishing ketosis following an overnight fast as well as deepening ketosis. High-intensity exercise will more quickly establish ketosis by forcing the liver to release glycogen into the bloodstream. However it can decrease the depth of ketosis by decreasing the availability of FFA. Performing ten minutes or more of low-intensity aerobics following high-intensity activity will help re-establish ketosis after high-intensity activity. There is a caloric threshold for exercise to improve the rate of fat loss. A calorie deficit more than 1000 cal/day will slow metabolism. Further increases in energy expenditure past that level does not increase fat loss. In some cases, excess exercise will increase the drop in metabolic rate seen with very large calorie deficits. This value of 1000 calories per day includes any caloric deficit AND exercise. Meaning that if 500 calories per day are removed from the diet, no more than 500 calories per day of exercise should be performed. If someone chose to remove 1000 calories per day from their diet, no aerobic exercise should be done to avoid metabolic slowdown. The decrease in metabolic rate seen with very lo Continue reading >>

The Power Of Intermittent Fasting

The Power Of Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting can help you take your fitness goals to the next level, if you’re already on a healthy fitness plan. Modern science also suggests it may be a key to successful weight loss Exercising on an empty stomach has been shown to have a number of health and fitness benefits as the combination of fasting and exercising maximizes the impact of cellular factors and catalysts that force the breakdown of fat and glycogen for energy, effectively forcing your body to burn fat without sacrificing muscle mass Some human studies that have found negligible or negative results of intermittent fasting have certain design flaws, such as subjects being forced to consume a fixed amount of calories instead of following cues of hunger, and using a diet design based on the typical American diet, high in carbs and low in protein and fiber. Fixed calorie counting and the typical American diet’s food ratio are inherently counter-effective to IF and therefore yield misleading results The same genes that promote human longevity also appear to suppress female reproductive capacity. Hence fasting and intense exercise protocols, both known to promote longevity, also lower estrogen levels, thereby modulating body composition in women and suppressing female reproductive capacity By Dr. Mercola If you're already off to a good start on a healthy fitness plan, and you're looking for ways to take it to the next level, then you might want to consider intermittent fasting. In essence this fitness-enhancing strategy looks at the timing of meals, as opposed to those fad plans where you eat just one or two things for several days in a row. On intermittent fasting, the longest time you'll ever abstain from food is 36 hours, although 14-18 hours is more common. You can also opt to simply delay Continue reading >>

How To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat Through Ketosis

How To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat Through Ketosis

Losing stubborn belly fat is one of the biggest challenges when getting in shape. Belly fat is not only aesthetically unappealing, it has health consequences. It can make you vulnerable to many conditions such as diabetes and heart problems. In this blog, we will share with you why belly fat is so ‘stubborn’ to burn, explain what exactly is Ketosis and how you can lose stubborn belly fat through Ketosis. We will also share a specific exercise and a diet plan to help burn this belly fat. What is Stubborn Belly fat and why it is bad for our health? While you may have fat all over different parts of your body, it isn’t the same. Stubborn belly fat is the soft layers of fat around the waistline that covers your abs. To be more precise, there are three types of fat: Triglycerides– A fat circulates in your blood Subcutaneous Fat– The layer of fat directly below the skin’s surface. This is the fat you can grab with your hands Visceral Fat– The dangerous fat. This is located beneath the muscles in your stomach Belly fat unfortunately does not just sit still. Some visceral fat is necessary, but too much can lead to health problems. You can estimate whether you are carrying too much belly fat by measuring your waist with tape. Anything over 80 cm (31.5 inches) in women and 94 cm (37 inches) can provoke health issues. Carrying excess visceral fat is associated with an increased risk for: Coronary heart disease Cancer Stroke Dementia Diabetes Depression Arthritis Obesity Sexual dysfunction Sleep disorders Why is Stubborn belly fat so “Stubborn”? To understand what makes belly fat so difficult to burn,let’s dive into the biology. Burning fat is a two-part process: Lipolysis is the process whereby fat cells release molecules of stored fat into the blood. Oxidation Continue reading >>

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